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 Post subject: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 1:01 pm 
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This one is more like a Tangredi puzzle.

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In this RASH puzzle, the elements correlate to four different, but related themes. The identifiers: 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th are used as placeholders for the four theme words. Most of the elements have an obvious correlation to the theme and some are more indirectly related. Each element correlates to only one theme.


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 1:29 pm 
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I can see where it's going to be tough, but I think I've got a few, including what the 4 theme words are:

3. is Club sandwich
4. is Country Club
9. is Mickey Mouse Club
14. is Old Maid
21. Might be Irons and Woods? (reference to golf?)
32. is Diamond Jim Brady
41. is Shoot the Moon
45. is Shine on, You Crazy Diamond
49. is Valentine

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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 1:32 pm 
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It might help if you had added the rules:

RASH Puzzle Rules: The clues are mixtures of components (words or syllables) that, when verbally replaced with appropriate counterparts, will integrate into answers that correspond to the puzzle’s theme.

Relatives are like things. Apples and oranges are relatives in the fruit family; Cupid and Blitzen are relatives in Santa’s reindeer; Mars and Jupiter are relatives in the family of planets
.
Antonyms are opposites: black and white, will and won’t, now and then.

Synonyms are different words with similar meanings: yellow and amber, cold and brisk, trash and rubbish, near and close.

Homophones/homonyms Homophones are pronounced the same, have different meanings, and may or may not have the same spelling: merry, marry and Mary. Homonyms have the same spelling and pronunciation but different meanings: bank (edge of a river, carom, or depository).


Here are a few explanatory notes to help you solve: If you can get a part of a clue, you can usually reason through the twisted combination of “nyms” to get the whole answer.

Some of the homonyms are not exact. For example, “day” may be as close as we could get to “Dave.” Such rough homonyms are denoted in italics to alert the solver to beware.

Hyphens separate syllables (single or multiple) within a single word. For example, Gas-yuk could translate to Air (synonym for gas) – ick (synonym for yuk). This results in Eric (translating the appropriate homophones).

Multiple words with no space constitute a single syllable or word. (For example, foursidedfigure could be replaced by square, rhombus, rectangle, etc.)

Underlined words or letters are not replaced; they are left as-is. (For example, the stays as the.)

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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 1:40 pm 
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Bob Juch wrote:
It might help if you had added the rules:

RASH Puzzle Rules: The clues are mixtures of components (words or syllables) that, when verbally replaced with appropriate counterparts, will integrate into answers that correspond to the puzzle’s theme.

Relatives are like things. Apples and oranges are relatives in the fruit family; Cupid and Blitzen are relatives in Santa’s reindeer; Mars and Jupiter are relatives in the family of planets
.
Antonyms are opposites: black and white, will and won’t, now and then.

Synonyms are different words with similar meanings: yellow and amber, cold and brisk, trash and rubbish, near and close.

Homophones/homonyms Homophones are pronounced the same, have different meanings, and may or may not have the same spelling: merry, marry and Mary. Homonyms have the same spelling and pronunciation but different meanings: bank (edge of a river, carom, or depository).


Here are a few explanatory notes to help you solve: If you can get a part of a clue, you can usually reason through the twisted combination of “nyms” to get the whole answer.

Some of the homonyms are not exact. For example, “day” may be as close as we could get to “Dave.” Such rough homonyms are denoted in italics to alert the solver to beware.

Hyphens separate syllables (single or multiple) within a single word. For example, Gas-yuk could translate to Air (synonym for gas) – ick (synonym for yuk). This results in Eric (translating the appropriate homophones).

Multiple words with no space constitute a single syllable or word. (For example, foursidedfigure could be replaced by square, rhombus, rectangle, etc.)

Underlined words or letters are not replaced; they are left as-is. (For example, the stays as the.)


Yeah, you're probably right. This is only like the 36th one of these that he's posted. Maybe by the time he gets to 40 he can stop reposting rules.

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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 1:44 pm 
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mrkelley23 wrote:
Bob Juch wrote:
It might help if you had added the rules:

RASH Puzzle Rules: The clues are mixtures of components (words or syllables) that, when verbally replaced with appropriate counterparts, will integrate into answers that correspond to the puzzle’s theme.

Relatives are like things. Apples and oranges are relatives in the fruit family; Cupid and Blitzen are relatives in Santa’s reindeer; Mars and Jupiter are relatives in the family of planets
.
Antonyms are opposites: black and white, will and won’t, now and then.

Synonyms are different words with similar meanings: yellow and amber, cold and brisk, trash and rubbish, near and close.

Homophones/homonyms Homophones are pronounced the same, have different meanings, and may or may not have the same spelling: merry, marry and Mary. Homonyms have the same spelling and pronunciation but different meanings: bank (edge of a river, carom, or depository).


Here are a few explanatory notes to help you solve: If you can get a part of a clue, you can usually reason through the twisted combination of “nyms” to get the whole answer.

Some of the homonyms are not exact. For example, “day” may be as close as we could get to “Dave.” Such rough homonyms are denoted in italics to alert the solver to beware.

Hyphens separate syllables (single or multiple) within a single word. For example, Gas-yuk could translate to Air (synonym for gas) – ick (synonym for yuk). This results in Eric (translating the appropriate homophones).

Multiple words with no space constitute a single syllable or word. (For example, foursidedfigure could be replaced by square, rhombus, rectangle, etc.)

Underlined words or letters are not replaced; they are left as-is. (For example, the stays as the.)


Yeah, you're probably right. This is only like the 36th one of these that he's posted. Maybe by the time he gets to 40 he can stop reposting rules.

Not everyone here has a great memory and search doesn't work.

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- Douglas Adams (1952 - 2001)

Si fractum non sit, noli id reficere.

Teach a child to be polite and courteous in the home and, when he grows up, he'll never be able to drive in New Jersey.


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 1:58 pm 
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Bob Juch wrote:
mrkelley23 wrote:
Bob Juch wrote:


Yeah, you're probably right. This is only like the 36th one of these that he's posted. Maybe by the time he gets to 40 he can stop reposting rules.

Not everyone here has a great memory and search doesn't work.


Really? Is it interface dependent? I entered RASH in the keyword field and vandal in the author field and immediately got several hits including this one for the very first one he posted.

Not trying to be snarky (for once) I just hadn't heard anything about search not working.

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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 2:20 pm 
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mrkelley23 wrote:
Bob Juch wrote:
mrkelley23 wrote:

Yeah, you're probably right. This is only like the 36th one of these that he's posted. Maybe by the time he gets to 40 he can stop reposting rules.

Not everyone here has a great memory and search doesn't work.


Really? Is it interface dependent? I entered RASH in the keyword field and vandal in the author field and immediately got several hits including this one for the very first one he posted.

Not trying to be snarky (for once) I just hadn't heard anything about search not working.

Well it's working now. I did a couple last week that returned no results. :roll:

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- Douglas Adams (1952 - 2001)

Si fractum non sit, noli id reficere.

Teach a child to be polite and courteous in the home and, when he grows up, he'll never be able to drive in New Jersey.


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 4:09 pm 
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17 Cloverleaf
25 nightstick


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:20 pm 
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Starting to get a little clearer now...

1. is Anti-Theft Device (The Club)
5. is The Tell-Tale Heart
7. is Ann and Nancy Wilson (from the group Heart)
11. is Heartbreak Hotel
12. Neil Young's only number one song (Heart of Gold)
15. is shovel (type of spade)
22. is Compressed carbon (which is what a diamond is.)
23. might be Open Heart Surgery (Everything makes sense to me except the open.)
29. is Heart attack
30. might be Good Old Boys' Club?
34. is Club Soda
43. is Sweet Caroline singer (or composer) (Neil Diamond)
47. is Clubhouse

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The real question of government versus private enterprise is argued on too philosophical and abstract a basis. Theoretically, planning may be good. But nobody has ever figured out the cause of government stupidity—and until they do (and find the cure), all ideal plans will fall into quicksand. -- Richard Feynman, "What do you Care what other People Think?"


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:25 pm 
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Bob Juch wrote:
mrkelley23 wrote:
Bob Juch wrote:
It might help if you had added the rules:

RASH Puzzle Rules: The clues are mixtures of components (words or syllables) that, when verbally replaced with appropriate counterparts, will integrate into answers that correspond to the puzzle’s theme.

Relatives are like things. Apples and oranges are relatives in the fruit family; Cupid and Blitzen are relatives in Santa’s reindeer; Mars and Jupiter are relatives in the family of planets
.
Antonyms are opposites: black and white, will and won’t, now and then.

Synonyms are different words with similar meanings: yellow and amber, cold and brisk, trash and rubbish, near and close.

Homophones/homonyms Homophones are pronounced the same, have different meanings, and may or may not have the same spelling: merry, marry and Mary. Homonyms have the same spelling and pronunciation but different meanings: bank (edge of a river, carom, or depository).


Here are a few explanatory notes to help you solve: If you can get a part of a clue, you can usually reason through the twisted combination of “nyms” to get the whole answer.

Some of the homonyms are not exact. For example, “day” may be as close as we could get to “Dave.” Such rough homonyms are denoted in italics to alert the solver to beware.

Hyphens separate syllables (single or multiple) within a single word. For example, Gas-yuk could translate to Air (synonym for gas) – ick (synonym for yuk). This results in Eric (translating the appropriate homophones).

Multiple words with no space constitute a single syllable or word. (For example, foursidedfigure could be replaced by square, rhombus, rectangle, etc.)

Underlined words or letters are not replaced; they are left as-is. (For example, the stays as the.)
Yeah, you're probably right. This is only like the 36th one of these that he's posted. Maybe by the time he gets to 40 he can stop reposting rules.
Not everyone here has a great memory and search doesn't work.
I'm embarrassed that you claim to be a computer geek.

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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 6:57 pm 
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Estonut wrote:
Bob Juch wrote:
mrkelley23 wrote:
Yeah, you're probably right. This is only like the 36th one of these that he's posted. Maybe by the time he gets to 40 he can stop reposting rules.
Not everyone here has a great memory and search doesn't work.
I'm embarrassed that you claim to be a computer geek.

Go right ahead.

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- Douglas Adams (1952 - 2001)

Si fractum non sit, noli id reficere.

Teach a child to be polite and courteous in the home and, when he grows up, he'll never be able to drive in New Jersey.


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 8:30 pm 
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Had I printed the RASH rules, they would have clearly stipulated:

No Cat Fights

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Available now:
The Secret At Haney Field: A Baseball Mystery
The Right Hand Rule
Center Point
Dizzy Miss Lizzie
Running On Empty
The Tick Tock Man


Visit my website: http://www.rmclarkauthor.com

With agent:
The Dragon's Song

Waiting their turn:
The Night Train
Devin Drake: World's Worst Magician

Just finished:
Devin Drake and The Family Secret

Up Next:
Devin Drake and The Roller-Ghoster
Devin Drake and the Haunted Balcony


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Fri Mar 24, 2017 9:43 am 
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mrkelley23 wrote:
23. might be Open Heart Surgery (Everything makes sense to me except the open.)


In both the front and the back of this answer, open = airy.

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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Fri Mar 24, 2017 10:02 am 
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CONSOLIDATION

1st = spade, 2nd = heart, 3rd = diamond, 4th = cub

1. anti-theft device [Club]
2.
3. club sandwich
4. country club
5. The Tell-Tale Heart
6.
7. Ann and Nancy Wilson [Heart]
8.
9. Mickey Mouse club
10.
11. Heartbreak Hotel
12. Neil Young's only number one song [Heart of Gold]
13. Blue Diamond almonds
14. Old Maid [usually the Queen of Clubs, but could also be here for the overall theme of cards]
15. shovel [Spade]
16.
17. cloverleaf [Club]
18. Arizona baseball team [Diamondbacks]
19.
20.
21. irons and woods [Clubs]
22. compressed carbon [Diamond]
23. open heart surgery
24.
25. nightstick [Club]
26.
27.
28.
29. heart attack
30. good old boys club
31.
32. Diamond Jim Brady
33.
34. club soda
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41. Shoot the Moon [Hearts]
42.
43. Sweet Caroline singer [Neil Diamond]
44.
45. Shine on, You Crazy Diamond
46.
47. clubhouse
48.
49. Valentine [Heart]
50.

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"... the baseless self-serving persecution foisted upon the Bored by Beast, Estonut, jarnon, Bob#s, and Weasel [in June]. Nonetheless, my life and this game go on as scheduled. Both my life and this game MUST go on, full speed, in direct defiance of the prejudice. Otherwise, the terrorists win."


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Fri Mar 24, 2017 10:15 am 
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38 Baseball diamond


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 2017 7:32 pm 
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Could a mod please release this thread and put it out of its misery?

Thanks.

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The Right Hand Rule
Center Point
Dizzy Miss Lizzie
Running On Empty
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With agent:
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Devin Drake: World's Worst Magician

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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 4:47 pm 
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I can add a few more

CONSOLIDATION

1st = spade, 2nd = heart, 3rd = diamond, 4th = cub

1. anti-theft device [Club]
2.
3. club sandwich
4. country club
5. The Tell-Tale Heart
6.
7. Ann and Nancy Wilson [Heart]
8. 4 H Club
9. Mickey Mouse club
10. neutered [spayed/spade]
11. Heartbreak Hotel
12. Neil Young's only number one song [Heart of Gold]
13. Blue Diamond almonds
14. Old Maid [usually the Queen of Clubs, but could also be here for the overall theme of cards]
15. shovel [Spade]
16.
17. cloverleaf [Club]
18. Arizona baseball team [Diamondbacks]
19. cardiologist [heart doctor]
20. Tom Petty's group [Heartbreakers]
21. irons and woods [Clubs]
22. compressed carbon [Diamond]
23. open heart surgery
24.
25. nightstick [Club]
26.
27.
28.
29. heart attack
30. good old boys club
31.
32. Diamond Jim Brady
33. hearts of palm
34. club soda
35. one stone studs [kind of diamond earrings]
36. parallelogram [diamond-shaped]
37. John Hughes movie [The Breakfast Club]
38.
39.
40. acid reflux [heartburn]
41. Shoot the Moon [Hearts]
42. Rules of Engagement Actor [David Spade]
43. Sweet Caroline singer [Neil Diamond]
44. Seventh 007 movie [Diamonds Are Forever; triple-x is apparently the Russian equivalent of double-o in the Bond universe]
45. Shine on, You Crazy Diamond
46.
47. clubhouse
48.
49. Valentine [Heart]
50.


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 8:45 pm 
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TheConfessor wrote:
38 Baseball diamond
Not sure about this one. Diamond should have been clued as "4th." I think it's just "field." The writer(s) missed an opportunity to include both the diamond or the club theme.

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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 9:44 pm 
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Got a few more:

2 Glass Cutter [Diamond]
16 Sierra Club
24 cubic zirconium [pseudo-diamond]
26 DeBeers [diamond company]
27 engagement ring [diamond]
31 I Love New York [heart]
46 artichoke heart
48 Humphrey Bogart role [Sam Spade]
50 Purple Heart

Only three left!

6 Wasp Legume X They
28 Forgot Scotland Statehouse
39 Fairytalecharacter Slice


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 10:50 am 
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Sorry for not letting it die, but got one more:

6. BPOE [club]


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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2017 1:52 am 
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plasticene wrote:
Sorry for not letting it die, but got one more:

6. BPOE [club]
This one was driving me nuts. I figured it had to be bee & pea, but the X really threw me. Now that I see this, I can't believe I didn't think of the Elle King song. At first, I couldn't get enough of it. Eventually, it was so overplayed here that I got a little sick of it. Still a great song, though.

Elle King - Ex's & Oh's (Official Video)

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 Post subject: Re: A Nasty RASH Puzzle
PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 10:25 pm 
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Hi: I'm Baaaack
39. Princess Cut (Diamond)


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