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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 8:42 pm 
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MI - 16009ii

Ben Cox
Sherman Oaks, CA

$500
Influential German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe succinctly described his design philosophy with what famous three-word phrase?
A: "Less is more" B: "I'll be back"
C: "You complete me" D: "Where's the beef?"

[Reveal] Spoiler: Answer
A: "Less is more"

$1,000
Including Yellow Jasmine, Carolina Cherry and Redbud, the 18 holes at Augusta National Golf Club, home of the Masters, are named after what?
A: Led Zeppelin albums B: Woody Allen movies
C: Types of trees and shrubs D: Rejected Power Rangers

[Reveal] Spoiler: Answer
C: Types of trees and shrubs

$2,000
Reflecting the strong Czech, Polish and German heritage of the state's residents, which of these is the official state dance of Wisconsin?
A: Polka B: Salsa
C: Can-can D: The Robot

[Reveal] Spoiler: Answer
A: Polka

$3,000
Using the hashtag #NamesForBeyonceTwins, Neil deGrasse Tyson suggested Castor and Pollux, fittingly the brightest stars in what constellation?
A: Aquarius B: Leo
C: Gemini D: Pisces

[Reveal] Spoiler: Answer
C: Gemini

Second commercial break

$5,000
A famously tough negotiator, what "Goodnight Moon" author once threatened to shoot her publisher with a bow and arrow for backing out of a deal?
A: Laura Ingalls Wilder B: Margaret Wise Brown
C: Beatrix Potter D: Judy Blume

[Reveal] Spoiler: Answer
B: Margaret Wise Brown

$7,000
Three of these words are anagrams of items you'd expect to find on a seafood menu. Which one is NOT?
A: Emanate B: Calm
C: Bolster D: Lose

Ben knows Lose becomes Sole, Bolster becomes Lobster, Emanate becomes Manatee (which he doesn't think is usually eaten). He has to think on Calm (before realizing it becomes Clam)
[Reveal] Spoiler: Answer
A: Emanate

$10,000
Which Spanish city is believed to have been named after a red, seeded fruit that's plentiful there?
A: Barcelona B: Bilbao
C: Granada D: Madrid

[Reveal] Spoiler: ATA
A: 3% B: 20% C: 72% D: 5%

[Reveal] Spoiler: Answer
C: Granada

Third commercial break
QotD wrote:
A building at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue in the Bronx is known as the birthplace of what music genre?
A: Folk B: Hip-Hop
C: Blues D: Techno

[Reveal] Spoiler: Answer
B: Hip-Hop

$20,000
In the famous "Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas Nevada" sign, the letters "W-E-L-C-O-M-E" are emblazoned on depictions of what?
A: Martini glasses B: Silver dollars
C: Showgirl silhouettes D: Dice

[Reveal] Spoiler: 50/50
50/50 leaves Silver dollars & Dice.

[Reveal] Spoiler: +1
Ben's +1 is his fiancée, Patricia. Patricia cannot remember the sign but she thinks Nevada is known for its silver. But then Las Vegas has gambling and dice so she's not sure. Patricia thinks a $10,000 wedding would be better than a $5,000 wedding but Ben came to play.

[Reveal] Spoiler: Answer
Ben guesses Dice.
The correct answer is B: Silver dollars
Ben wins $5,000


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 7:23 am 
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BBTranscriptTeam wrote:
Patricia thinks a $10,000 wedding would be better than a $5,000 wedding but Ben came to play.
Good instinct for a game show contestant, but Ben's husband training is just beginning.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 8:15 am 
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5K: Only get right author by eliminating others.

10K: The fruit is named after the city. "Apple of Granada". Not the other way 'round. Big clue error here.

Also, grenades get their name because they, at least originally, were loaded up with seeds of explosives &/or shrapnel, & people thought they resembled pomegranates.

20K: Showgirl silhouttes are so tacky there'd protests even in Vegas. ATA, as show is filmed there.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 8:55 am 
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ghostjmf wrote:
5K: Only get right author by eliminating others.

10K: The fruit is named after the city. "Apple of Granada". Not the other way 'round. Big clue error here.

Also, grenades get their name because they, at least originally, were loaded up with seeds of explosives &/or shrapnel, & people thought they resembled pomegranates.


That is probably folk etymology. Both ways.
[Reveal] Spoiler:
Really there may be no connection between the city name and the fruit. Most dictionaries say "pomegranate" comes from Latin: pome (apple) and granatum (seeded). The scientific name punica granatum follows that pattern. That word "pomegranate" precedes the founding of the city in Spain. The name of the city of Granada more likely derives from Arabic, Karnattah or Garnata, meaning "hill of strangers." The local Moors established their capital of Al-Andalus on a hilltop near the present site of the city.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:00 am 
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andrewjackson wrote:
ghostjmf wrote:
5K: Only get right author by eliminating others.

10K: The fruit is named after the city. "Apple of Granada". Not the other way 'round. Big clue error here.

Also, grenades get their name because they, at least originally, were loaded up with seeds of explosives &/or shrapnel, & people thought they resembled pomegranates.


That is probably folk etymology. Both ways.
[Reveal] Spoiler:
Really there may be no connection between the city name and the fruit. Most dictionaries say "pomegranate" comes from Latin: pome (apple) and granatum (seeded). The scientific name punica granatum follows that pattern. That word "pomegranate" precedes the founding of the city in Spain. The name of the city of Granada more likely derives from Arabic, Karnattah or Garnata, meaning "hill of strangers." The local Moors established their capital of Al-Andalus on a hilltop near the present site of the city.



Reason #48 why I love this bored.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:21 am 
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BBTranscriptTeam wrote:
Ben Cox
Sherman Oaks, CA


BBTranscriptTeam wrote:
$20,000
In the famous "Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas Nevada" sign, the letters "W-E-L-C-O-M-E" are emblazoned on depictions of what?
A: Martini glasses B: Silver dollars
C: Showgirl silhouettes D: Dice
[Reveal] Spoiler: 50/50
50/50 leaves Silver dollars & Dice.

[Reveal] Spoiler: +1
Ben's +1 is his fiancée, Patricia. Patricia cannot remember the sign but she thinks Nevada is known for its silver. But then Las Vegas has gambling and dice so she's not sure. Patricia thinks a $10,000 wedding would be better than a $5,000 wedding but Ben came to play.

[Reveal] Spoiler: Answer
Ben guesses Dice.
The correct answer is B: Silver dollars
Ben wins $5,000

I have all my lifelines, and since this is a Vegas audience, I'll ask them.

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"Elen sila lumenn omentielvo...A star shines on the hour of our meeting."


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 10:04 am 
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Re AJ's info: Well, thanks. I was using what I'd learned rather than looking it up.

But by AJ's citing the clue is still wrong, as the city name has an Arabic root, not Latin.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 10:58 am 
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andrewjackson wrote:
ghostjmf wrote:
5K: Only get right author by eliminating others.

10K: The fruit is named after the city. "Apple of Granada". Not the other way 'round. Big clue error here.

Also, grenades get their name because they, at least originally, were loaded up with seeds of explosives &/or shrapnel, & people thought they resembled pomegranates.


That is probably folk etymology. Both ways.
[Reveal] Spoiler:
Really there may be no connection between the city name and the fruit. Most dictionaries say "pomegranate" comes from Latin: pome (apple) and granatum (seeded). The scientific name punica granatum follows that pattern. That word "pomegranate" precedes the founding of the city in Spain. The name of the city of Granada more likely derives from Arabic, Karnattah or Garnata, meaning "hill of strangers." The local Moors established their capital of Al-Andalus on a hilltop near the present site of the city.

According to Chris and the flavortext he read after the answer, it was apparently Spanish for "pomegranate." Maybe other sources make the etymology a little more dubious?


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 12:16 pm 
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Agrajag wrote:
andrewjackson wrote:
ghostjmf wrote:
5K: Only get right author by eliminating others.

10K: The fruit is named after the city. "Apple of Granada". Not the other way 'round. Big clue error here.

Also, grenades get their name because they, at least originally, were loaded up with seeds of explosives &/or shrapnel, & people thought they resembled pomegranates.


That is probably folk etymology. Both ways.
[Reveal] Spoiler:
Really there may be no connection between the city name and the fruit. Most dictionaries say "pomegranate" comes from Latin: pome (apple) and granatum (seeded). The scientific name punica granatum follows that pattern. That word "pomegranate" precedes the founding of the city in Spain. The name of the city of Granada more likely derives from Arabic, Karnattah or Garnata, meaning "hill of strangers." The local Moors established their capital of Al-Andalus on a hilltop near the present site of the city.

According to Chris and the flavortext he read after the answer, it was apparently Spanish for "pomegranate." Maybe other sources make the etymology a little more dubious?


"Granada" is definitely Spanish for pomegranate. But that could just be convergence. It doesn't necessarily mean that one word came from the other.

The Moors establish a base called something like Garnata. Over time the local Spanish corrupt that into a word they already have for the fruit. That kind of thing happens all the time. To a certain extent you could say that the question might be right.
"Which Spanish city is believed to have been named after a red, seeded fruit that's plentiful there?" The city was named after the fruit. But the reason why people settled on that word was because people were already calling it something very close to Granada.

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