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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:00 am 
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Let's see how much help I can contribute...

26. I can’t swear that he was the only sitting member of the U.S. Senate to win a Grammy and have a record on the Billboard Top Forty, but if you can think of another….

I don't know if Sam Ervin won a Grammy for his album, but I can name three former senators who have definitely won Grammys: President Obama, Al Franken, and Everett Dirksen. Since Billboard Top Forty concerns singles rather than albums, I'll lock in with EVERETT DIRKSEN.

40. Her career began at a local station in her home state of South Carolina; by the 1990s, you could watch her at least twice every weekday, on a national show biz newsmagazine and her own syndicated talk show.

DEBORAH NORVILLE?

I was actually thinking of LEEZA GIBBONS on this one.

58. At the age of 21, this future PBA Hall of Famer became the youngest bowler ever to win the Tournament of Champions – a record that stood for forty years.

PETE WEBER? EARL ANTHONY? WALTER RAY WILLIAMS?

As great as he is, Walter Ray Williams Jr. never won the PBA TOC. Weber and Anthony were much older than 21. I remember than when Jesper Svensson won it last season, he had broken the age record held by MARSHALL HOLMAN.

88. An important precursor to Copernicus, this medieval priest and philosopher is better remembered today for his indecisive ass.

I actually asked a question about this famous ass on The Old Bored® many many years ago. It's BURIDAN (as in the Buridan's ass paradox)

95. A classic 1908 novel by this Scottish author features what is almost certainly the most likable rat in all of children’s literature.

I thought of Stuart Little, but I believe that E.B. White was American, not Scottish.

96. In 1986, he became the first Latin American filmmaker to receive an Oscar nomination for Best Director.

HECTOR BABENCO (Kiss of the Spider Woman)

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:03 pm 
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Updated consolidation coming shortly.

I KNEW I missed sss's Mantan Moreland (right beofre I went to bed). I also realized I'd forgotten my Winnie Winkle correction.

ALSO

How about Ratty, the water vole, to give us Wind in the Willows' KENNETH GRAHAME?

95. A classic 1908 novel by this Scottish author features what is almost certainly the most likable rat in all of children’s literature.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 1:34 pm 
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1) Apologies to all whose contributions were not in the first consolidation. Should have just waited until now (tough Thursday with funeral for friend's soin)

2) FRANK SAYS:

A) Of the definites, in one case you're definitely thinking of the right person, but the last name is wrong. [ this is DIEGO RIVERA].

B) Two others are wrong, and three are right but misspelled in ways that may matter [I think Mr. K took care of the misspelled names].

C) Those with two suggested answers each include the correct answer. The one with three suggested answers does not. [I think Marshall Holman takes care of the three wrong answers]/

D) Of those with a single answer with a question mark, seven are right and eight are wrong.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON CONSOLIDATION

Game #174: Puzzle Jam

Identify the 125 people in the clues below. Match them into 65 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words.

Five of the names will be used twice, each time in a different way. Some alternate matches are possible, but only one solution will allow you to use all the names and Associated Words.

1. He was the first Republican to win a majority of the popular vote in two successive Presidential elections.

ULYSSES GRANT

2. This Talmudic scholar is credited with saying, ‘What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow: this is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation.’

HILLEL

3. The role that won this actor his only Oscar nomination was actually a composite of several military leaders who played a role in a revolt against the ‘sick man of Europe.’

OMAR SHARIF

4. Perhaps second only to John Donne among metaphysical poets, he was also England’s leading practitioner of shaped poetry.

6. In one of the most controversial boxing matches of all time, this heavyweight was able to retain his title partly because his opponent failed to retire to a neutral corner at a critical moment.

GENE TUNNEY (Jack Dempsey is the fighter who didn’t go to the corner – this is The Long Count fight)

7. It’s not certain that this jazz great – renowned for his volatile temper – once got so angry with hecklers that he destroyed a $20,000 bass, but it’s apparently quite true that he once snapped at a noisy nightclub audience, ‘Isaac Stern doesn’t have to put up with this s**t.’

CHARLIE MINGUS

8. DJMQ: In 2013, this Romanian-born prima ballerina – accompanied by her dancer husband – left the Royal Ballet to become a principal dancer with the English National Ballet.
[Another DJMQ appears at #102. Someone may want to message JM to alert her that she’s on duty.)

9. One of this painter’s most ambitious works was destroyed due to its portrayal of Lenin, but fortunately, he – the painter, not Lenin – was able to reproduce it later on.

DIEGO RIVERA

10. He has been played on screen by two different actors who each won two consecutive Oscars, one of whom won the first of his two consecutive Oscars for playing him. Got that?

BEN BRADLEE

11. This Black Panther went from convicted rapist, to Presidential candidate of the same left-wing party that later nominated Dr. Spock, to conservative Republican … and from Muslim to Christian to Moonie to Mormon.

ELDRIDGE CLEAVER

12. Eighteen years after this entrepreneur’s death, the company he founded was merged with four other companies to form the International Harvester Company.

CYRUS MCCORMACK?

13. Only three current female Senators have served longer than this former chair of the Agriculture Committee

NANCY KASSEBAUM?

14. This French philosopher and Nobel laureate developed his theory of ‘duration’ and his defense of free will partly as a response to the ideas of Kant.

JEAN-PAUL SARTRE

15. After receiving Oscar nominations for writing and directing his breakthrough film, he seemed to enter a steady decline, earning four Razzies for writing, directing, and acting. (He was also nominated for writing and directing a movie that has a special place in the Bored’s heart.)

M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN

16. A speech he delivered at mass on September 16, 1810, turned this Roman Catholic priest into a revolutionary military leader.

17. Using Moliere as a model, this 18th century dramatist played a key role in the transition of Italian comedy from the conventions of commedia dell'arte to the representation of real life. (His most popular was recently adapted and updated into a West End and Broadway hit.)

EUGENE IONESCO?

18. In an influential 1942 book, this British-American anthropologist rejected the concept of race, calling it ‘man’s most dangerous myth.’

19. The first misfortune of his life took place at the moment of his conception, when his mother asked his father if he had remembered to wind the clock; an even greater misfortune came a few years later, when a window sash fell just as he was urinating out a window.

TRISTRAM SHANDY?

20. While testifying in the Senate against requiring parental warning labels on record albums, this heavy metal vocalist – who grew up only a few miles away from me – surprised both Tipper Gore and his fans by stating that he was raised a Christian and still adhered to Christian principles.

DEE SNIDER

21. This 17th century mathematician contributed to calculus, analytic geometry, and number theory, but he is perhaps best remembered for something he jotted down in the margins of an ancient Greek textbook.

PIERRE FERMAT

22. This infielder was the first Puerto Rican to be named Rookie of the Year by either league

ORLANDO CEPEDA

23. In December 2017, this winner of three James Beard awards became the most prominent celebrity chef taken down by the Weinstein Effect.

MARIO BATALI

24. He was the first Asian American in space.

ELLISON ONIZUKA

25. Despite his nickname of ‘Black Sam,’ he is generally considered one of the least ruthless of the great 18th century pirates; despite the fact that his career in piracy lasted little over the year, his capture of more than 50 ships made him probably the wealthiest pirate in history.

26. I can’t swear that he was the only sitting member of the U.S. Senate to win a Grammy and have a record on the Billboard Top Forty, but if you can think of another….

SAM ERVIN? EVERETT DIRKSEN?

27. In addition to introducing the techniques of Italian Renaissance architecture to England, he also designed scenery for the elaborate masques of Ben Jonson.

28. She founded the League of Women Voters and was president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association when the Nineteenth Amendment finally passed

ALICE PAUL?

No -- CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT

29. The grocery store that he opened in the 1840s has since grown into a legendary retail establishment occupying five acres on Brompton Road.

HARROD?

30. His 35 year tenure was the longest of any principal conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic.

HERBERT VON KARAJAN

31. This poet did for Bill Clinton in 1993 what Robert Frost did for John F. Kennedy in 1961.

MAYA ANGELOU

32. In 1939, this American physicist won Thomas Watson’s approval to develop a device that would bring Charles Babbage’s ideas to fruition.

33. In 1956, this legendary performer won a Tony award for her role in a musical composed by her equally legendary husband.

LOTTE LENYA

34. As you may recall from my last general knowledge game, this evangelist is largely responsible for the fact that my former college roommate has been eagerly anticipating the end of the world for 48 years.

HAL LINDSEY?

35. Since the introduction of the current ranking system in 1973, this tennis player achieved the highest ranking of any Frenchman.

YANNICK NOAH

36. For two decades, this officer’s Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States served as the official manual of the U.S. military.

37. During his long career at the University of Chicago, this archaeologist popularized the term ‘Fertile Crescent,’ helped Howard Carter decipher the seals found in King Tut’s tomb, and became the first American to hold a university chair in Egyptology and Oriental History.

38. This superhero was introduced in 1941, discontinued in 1950, revived in 1964, and has not been out of print since.

CAPTAIN AMERICA

39. Around 1754 bc, this emperor had his most famous decree inscribed on a stele which is now housed in the Louvre.

HAMMURABI

40. Her career began at a local station in her home state of South Carolina; by the 1990s, you could watch her at least twice every weekday, on a national show biz newsmagazine and her own syndicated talk show.

LEEZA GIBBONS (Norville is from Georgia)

41. Her fossil finds at Lyme Regis won her renown and made her a key figure in the development of paleontology, but she was still barred from membership in the Geological Society of London.

42. This Nobel laureate first won recognition for his comic novels set in his native Trinidad.

43. In 1979, he became the first Canadian performer inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

HANK SNOW

44. And last year, he became the second Finnish player inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

TEEMU SELANNE

45. The writing team consisting, alphabetically, of these two longtime collaborators –

LOWELL GANZ

46. – has penned more than twenty films and numerous television shows, but they received their only Oscar nomination for a hit comedy about a girl with gills.

BABALOO MANDEL

(Grazer and Howard were the producers and Ron Howard certainly has more than one Oscar nomination)

47. In 1920, this cartoonist launched one of the first comic strips to focus on the new breed of ‘working girl’ – specifically, a single woman who had to support her parents and later became a widowed mother and successful fashion designer.

MARTIN BRANNER

48. In a little over a decade, this American supermodel has been a Victoria’s Secret Angel, appeared on the cover of the Swimsuit Issue, and served as a spokesmodel for both Harley Davidson and the NFL.

MARISA MILLER

49. There is some question as to whether she was really as wicked as her enemies and Robert Graves made her out to be, but there is no question that she was executed for allegedly conspiring against her own husband.

50. As Commander-in-Chief of French forces on the Western Front, this general was credited with the French victory – if you can call it that – at the Battle of the Marne.

PETAIN

51. This prominent Swiss theologian was an active leader in the Confessing Church, which opposed Hitler’s attempts to unite all German Protestant denominations into a single, pro-Nazi body.

52. The decisions of this longtime district and appeals court judge have been cited more often by the Supreme Court than those of any other lower court jurist.

LEARNED HAND

53. He resigned his 14-year presidency of an Ivy League University – which he skillfully guided through the Vietnam years – in order to accept a post at the Court of St. James.

54. This publisher staunchly opposed slavery in his newspaper, the National Era, but his greatest contribution to abolitionism was serializing a certain novel by a certain Mrs. Stowe.

WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON?

55. Despite his limited supply of cash, this rapper knows how to put together a f**king awesome wardrobe.

MACKLEMORE

56. This American writer is best remembered – if at all – for his best-selling comic novel about a hick army recruit, which was turned into an more successful Broadway play by Ira Levin, and then into an even more successful movie.

MAC HYMAN

57. Not one to sit on his barony, this hereditary British nobleman earned a Nobel Prize for his discovery of argon.

58. At the age of 21, this future PBA Hall of Famer became the youngest bowler ever to win the Tournament of Champions – a record that stood for forty years.

MARSHALL HOLMAN

59. This British actor won a Tony for his role in a Tom Stoppard play, an Oscar for his role as a real life accused murderer, one Emmy for his role as a real life Elizabethan nobleman, and two more Emmys for his skills as a narrator.

JEREMY IRONS

60. One of the first American women to earn a Ph.D. in engineering, she and her husband were pioneers in the field of industrial efficiency – a skill that also came in handy raising their twelve children.

LILLIAN GILBRETH

61. According to Milton, this demon was second in command to Satan.

BEELZEBUB

62. This French philosopher and political scientist turned Karl Marx on his ear with a book that called Marxism ‘the opium of the intellectuals.’

63. He was the first Brit to get one million subscribers on his YouTube channel, which is socoollike.

64. He was the second African American to serve in the U.S. Senate and the first to serve a full term; he also received eight votes for Vice President at the 1880 Republican National Convention.

65. There is some dispute over whether this young lady really was the first love of a future U.S. President, but there is no disputing the fact that she died of typhoid at the age of 22.

ANN RUTLEDGE

66. ’Personal — comely widow who owns a large farm in one of the finest districts in La Porte County, Indiana, desires to make the acquaintance of a gentleman equally well provided, with view of joining fortunes. No replies by letter considered unless sender is willing to follow answer with personal visit. Triflers need not apply.’ If you answered this ad, you were likely to become another victim of this statuesque serial killer, who may have offed between 25 and 40 people, including her own husbands and children. (A recent DNA test failed to settle the question of whether she faked her own death.)

67. This gestalt psychologist was best known for his conformity experiments, in which a subject asked to judge the relative lengths of lines was pressured into giving obviously wrong answers after a group of confederates all gave the same wrong answers.

68. Though he performed important research in aerodynamics, this French engineer will forever be associated with the iconic structure that bears his name. (And I do not use the word ‘iconic’ lightly.)

GUSTAV EIFFEL

69. This skilled comic actor spent most of his Hollywood career relegated to the same types of roles as Stepin Fetchit – most popularly in support of a detective who perpetrated a whole ‘nother set of ethnic stereotypes.

MANTAN MORELAND

70. This Swiss playwright took Broadway by storm in 1958 with a savagely cynical tale of vengeance that also marked the last stage appearance of the Lunts.

71. His performance on Benny Goodman’s signature hit helped turn the drums into a major solo instrument.

GENE KRUPA

72. I may or may not be related to this military hero of the First Crusade, who was proclaimed Prince of Galilee after the capture of Jerusalem and later became the subject of an opera.

TANCREDI

73. In 1981, a Sports Illustrated cover proclaimed him ‘The Best Defensive Lineman of All Time;’ eighteen years later Sporting News ranked him at #2.

JOHN HANNAH

74. Miss Jean Brodie’s favorite Italian artist, this late medieval painter was credited by Vasari with ‘introducing the technique of drawing accurately from life, which had been neglected for more than two hundred years.’

75. This environmental activist was the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

76. Though he was almost certainly not the villain and/or coward many popular accounts have made him out to be, this executive’s career never quite recovered from the criticism he received for not dying on April 15, 1912.

BRUCE ISMAY

77. His career as a journalist was relatively unremarkable until a 1965 article about the Hell’s Angels set him on a new path.

HUNTER S. THOMPSON

78. This physicist received the Nobel Prize for inventing a technique for photographically recording a light field – which you may know better by another term.

RÖENTGEN

79. This early Church Father, who served as archbishop of Constantinople at the turn of the 5th century, is recognized as a saint by the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglican churches.

ST. CYRIL?

80. Modeled after G.K. Chesterton, this amateur sleuth unlocked seemingly impossible mysteries in such novels as The Problem of the Wire Cage, The Three Coffins, and The Arabian Nights Murder.

DR. GIDEON FELL

81. No singer ever put more conviction or oomph into a lyric such as ‘Mercy mercy puddin’ pie’ than she did.

LAVERN BAKER

82. This American novelist is best remembered for his 1896 novel about the ‘Damnation’ of a young Methodist pastor.

83. Founder of the League for Physical Culture, he organized America’s first nudist outing on Labor Day 1929. (In case you were wondering, four men and three women stripped down for the event.)

84. Often considered America’s first scientific historian, he achieved renown with his 1843 history of the conquest of Mexico.

WILLIAM PRESCOTT

85. This silent screen beauty was nicknamed the ‘Orchid Lady.’

CORINNE GRIFFITH

86. Daley Thompson won and lost the world record in the decathlon four times, ultimately losing it for good to this American.

DAN O'BRIEN

87. Speaking of the ‘sick man of Europe’ – as we were 84 questions ago – it was this military leader who ultimately changed that status from ‘sick’ to ‘expired.’

T.E. LAWRENCE? ALLENBY?

88. An important precursor to Copernicus, this medieval priest and philosopher is better remembered today for his indecisive ass.

BURIDAN

89. This activist nun served for two years as chairperson of the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty.

SISTER HELEN PREJEAN

90. This Roman Catholic clergyman is the chief villain in what is BY FAR the most popular novel published in 1831.

CLAUDE FROLLO

91. He co-founded the company which produced the world’s first truly transistorized radio, and remained its chairman until suffering a stroke while playing tennis at the age of 72.

DAVID SARNOFF?

92. He wrote the lyrics for my all-time favorite musical – look to the left and you’ll see me performing in it – but his biggest hit was the first Broadway musical to run more than 3000 performances.

SHELDON HARNICK

93. This German chemist’s theorem – which states that, as absolute zero is approached, the entropy change ΔS for a chemical or physical transformation approaches 0 – was an important step in establishing the Third Law of Thermodynamics.

94. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, this admiral was removed from command of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and busted from four to two stars.

HUSBAND KIMMEL

95. A classic 1908 novel by this Scottish author features what is almost certainly the most likable rat in all of children’s literature.

KENNETH GRAHAME

96. In 1986, he became the first Latin American filmmaker to receive an Oscar nomination for Best Director.

HECTOR BABENCO (Kiss of the Spider Woman)

97. Major Enlightenment figures who sat for this neoclassical sculptor included Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, and Ben Franklin.

98. This journalist – who will celebrate his 96th birthday next month – served at various times as a correspondent for CBS, NBC, and the New York Times, but his tenure as spokesman for the U.S. State Department ended when he resigned in protest over the Reagan administration’s disinformation campaign against Muammar Gaddafi.

Isn't this BERNARD KALB?

99. This philosopher’s most iconic statement – and, as we know, I do not use the word ‘iconic’ lightly – is found in a treatise the full title of which is A Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting One's Reason and of Seeking Truth in the Sciences.

RENE DESCARTES

100. This scientist and politician – no, they are not mutually exclusive – went from chairing the Atomic Energy Commission to governing a state.

DIXY LEE RAY

101. A member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, he played more than 16,000 games in a professional career that spanned five decades – and not one of those games was played in the NBA.

MEADOWLARK LEMON? GOOSE TATUM? (Melly note: I think Tatum died too young to play five decades).

102. DJMQ: This dancer and choreographer enjoyed a 60+ year career interpreting and teaching the works and techniques of Martha Graham – and a 40+ marriage to Dr. No.

103. He became nationally known as the father of Cara, Madelyn, Aaden, Collin, Joel, Alexis, Hannah, and Leah.

JON GOSSELIN

104. Speaking of grocery stores – as we were 75 questions ago – the grocery store that he opened in 1883 has since grown into America’s largest supermarket chain by revenue.

KROGER?

105. In 1977, he became the second and last Spanish poet to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

107. This American physicist and his older Italian collaborator received the Nobel Prize for their discovery of the antiproton.

108. In an epic 1983 movie, this actor played a real-life hero who really, really, really did not want the press to use his first name.

BEN KINGSLEY

109. Born into slavery in New York, this reformer delivered a memorable speech at an 1851 women’s rights convention in Akron, Ohio. (The answer to the rhetorical question posed in that speech was ‘Yes.’)

SOJOURNER TRUTH

110. After fifteen years of refusing, for legal reasons, to perform any of his old songs, this rocker finally relented at a concert in 1987 because, as he said, ‘Bob Dylan asked me.’

JOHN FOGERTY?

111. Though a strong supporter of the Salem Witch Trials, this minister wrote to one of the judges warning him not to ‘lay more stress on pure spectral evidence than it will bear.’

COTTON MATHER

112. In 1952, this Australian tennis player won the first of her two Women’s Singles titles, the second of her four Mixed Doubles titles, and the tenth of her twelve Women’s Doubles titles at the Australian Open.

Can't be Margaret Court. The timeline is off.

113. The last president of France’s Third Republic, he said that he never resigned his position after the Nazi takeover because – with the National Assembly disbanded – there was no one to tender his resignation to.

114. This military commander attained the peerage as a result, not of his most famous victory, but of his leadership in the earlier Peninsular War.

115. This American impressionist is best known for a series of paintings with the Stars and Stripes as their central motif.

JASPER JOHNS

116. She is the head designer for the luxury goods company founded by her grandfather in 1913.

PRADA??

117. This puritanical steward becomes the victim of a cruel hoax and eventually stalks off stage swearing, ‘I’ll be reveng’d on the whole pack of you.’ (Regrettably, his creator never got around to writing Part Two: The Revenge.)

118. This explorer got his name on two bodies of water thanks to the expeditions he undertook at the behest of Peter the Great.

VITUS BERING

119. Regarding his influential 1905 novel, this writer commented, ‘I aimed at the public's heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach.’

UPTON SINCLAIR

120. She is the Oscar-winning daughter of a Tony-winning and Emmy-winning mother – and yes, that is the exact obverse of a clue in my last movie game.

GWYNETH PALTROW

121. The name of this British biologist will forever be linked with that of the younger American with whom he made a very important discovery in 1953

FRANCIS CRICK

122. Talk about your power couples: he won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to money theory, while his wife won the Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts on behalf of disarmament.

123. Christy Mathewson, Walter Johnson, and Cy Young were the only pitchers to beat this one into the Hall of Fame.

GROVER CLEVELAND ALEXANDER

124. When this composer published his most popular work in 1725, each sonata was accompanied by a sonnet, one of which reads in part, ‘On the flower-strewn meadow, with leafy branches/Rustling overhead, the goat-herd sleeps/His faithful dog beside him.’

VIVALDI

125. He completes the following list: Theodore Roosevelt; Jimmy Carter; Barack Obama.

WOODROW WILSON


ASSOCIATED WORD LIST
Genesis
Five
24
40
Bohemia
Weimar
Wyoming
Hawaii
Wisconsin
Tennessee
Long Island
Houston
Philadelphia
DC
Dragon
Owl
Falcon
Duck
Buck
Bunny
Cub
Giant
Pirate
Hitman
Sniper
Counterfeiter
Amateur
Communist
Commissioner
Dean
Homer
Vince
Charles
Shelley
Joy
Boone
Brown
Nixon
Psychology
Biochemistry
Rolling
Flying
Hanging
Kiss
Touch
Stroke
Velvet
Gown
Shoes
Ice Cream
Milk Shake
Chips
Borscht
Wall
Balcony
Radio
Tool
Instrument
Follies
Cabaret
Psycho
King of Kings
Speed
Race
Cruel


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 1:48 pm 
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mellytu74 wrote:
91. He co-founded the company which produced the world’s first truly transistorized radio, and remained its chairman until suffering a stroke while playing tennis at the age of 72.

DAVID SARNOFF?


This is Akio Morita of Sony.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 2:29 pm 
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Of the definite answers, five are wrong.

Of the answers with a question mark, seven are right and five are wrong. (In the case of one of these, a correct spelling was changed into an incorrect spelling.)

Two of the ones that include two alternates include the correct answer, and in each case someone has already made a strong argument for the correct answer. The third one with two alternates does not include the correct answer; the two men suggested played a role but someone else completed the job.


mellytu74 wrote:
1) Apologies to all whose contributions were not in the first consolidation. Should have just waited until now (tough Thursday with funeral for friend's soin)

2) FRANK SAYS:

A) Of the definites, in one case you're definitely thinking of the right person, but the last name is wrong. [ this is DIEGO RIVERA].

B) Two others are wrong, and three are right but misspelled in ways that may matter [I think Mr. K took care of the misspelled names].

C) Those with two suggested answers each include the correct answer. The one with three suggested answers does not. [I think Marshall Holman takes care of the three wrong answers]/

D) Of those with a single answer with a question mark, seven are right and eight are wrong.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON CONSOLIDATION

Game #174: Puzzle Jam

Identify the 125 people in the clues below. Match them into 65 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words.

Five of the names will be used twice, each time in a different way. Some alternate matches are possible, but only one solution will allow you to use all the names and Associated Words.

1. He was the first Republican to win a majority of the popular vote in two successive Presidential elections.

ULYSSES GRANT

2. This Talmudic scholar is credited with saying, ‘What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow: this is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation.’

HILLEL

3. The role that won this actor his only Oscar nomination was actually a composite of several military leaders who played a role in a revolt against the ‘sick man of Europe.’

OMAR SHARIF

4. Perhaps second only to John Donne among metaphysical poets, he was also England’s leading practitioner of shaped poetry.

6. In one of the most controversial boxing matches of all time, this heavyweight was able to retain his title partly because his opponent failed to retire to a neutral corner at a critical moment.

GENE TUNNEY (Jack Dempsey is the fighter who didn’t go to the corner – this is The Long Count fight)

7. It’s not certain that this jazz great – renowned for his volatile temper – once got so angry with hecklers that he destroyed a $20,000 bass, but it’s apparently quite true that he once snapped at a noisy nightclub audience, ‘Isaac Stern doesn’t have to put up with this s**t.’

CHARLIE MINGUS

8. DJMQ: In 2013, this Romanian-born prima ballerina – accompanied by her dancer husband – left the Royal Ballet to become a principal dancer with the English National Ballet.
[Another DJMQ appears at #102. Someone may want to message JM to alert her that she’s on duty.)

9. One of this painter’s most ambitious works was destroyed due to its portrayal of Lenin, but fortunately, he – the painter, not Lenin – was able to reproduce it later on.

DIEGO RIVERA

10. He has been played on screen by two different actors who each won two consecutive Oscars, one of whom won the first of his two consecutive Oscars for playing him. Got that?

BEN BRADLEE

11. This Black Panther went from convicted rapist, to Presidential candidate of the same left-wing party that later nominated Dr. Spock, to conservative Republican … and from Muslim to Christian to Moonie to Mormon.

ELDRIDGE CLEAVER

12. Eighteen years after this entrepreneur’s death, the company he founded was merged with four other companies to form the International Harvester Company.

CYRUS MCCORMACK?

13. Only three current female Senators have served longer than this former chair of the Agriculture Committee

NANCY KASSEBAUM?

14. This French philosopher and Nobel laureate developed his theory of ‘duration’ and his defense of free will partly as a response to the ideas of Kant.

JEAN-PAUL SARTRE

15. After receiving Oscar nominations for writing and directing his breakthrough film, he seemed to enter a steady decline, earning four Razzies for writing, directing, and acting. (He was also nominated for writing and directing a movie that has a special place in the Bored’s heart.)

M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN

16. A speech he delivered at mass on September 16, 1810, turned this Roman Catholic priest into a revolutionary military leader.

17. Using Moliere as a model, this 18th century dramatist played a key role in the transition of Italian comedy from the conventions of commedia dell'arte to the representation of real life. (His most popular was recently adapted and updated into a West End and Broadway hit.)

EUGENE IONESCO?

18. In an influential 1942 book, this British-American anthropologist rejected the concept of race, calling it ‘man’s most dangerous myth.’

19. The first misfortune of his life took place at the moment of his conception, when his mother asked his father if he had remembered to wind the clock; an even greater misfortune came a few years later, when a window sash fell just as he was urinating out a window.

TRISTRAM SHANDY?

20. While testifying in the Senate against requiring parental warning labels on record albums, this heavy metal vocalist – who grew up only a few miles away from me – surprised both Tipper Gore and his fans by stating that he was raised a Christian and still adhered to Christian principles.

DEE SNIDER

21. This 17th century mathematician contributed to calculus, analytic geometry, and number theory, but he is perhaps best remembered for something he jotted down in the margins of an ancient Greek textbook.

PIERRE FERMAT

22. This infielder was the first Puerto Rican to be named Rookie of the Year by either league

ORLANDO CEPEDA

23. In December 2017, this winner of three James Beard awards became the most prominent celebrity chef taken down by the Weinstein Effect.

MARIO BATALI

24. He was the first Asian American in space.

ELLISON ONIZUKA

25. Despite his nickname of ‘Black Sam,’ he is generally considered one of the least ruthless of the great 18th century pirates; despite the fact that his career in piracy lasted little over the year, his capture of more than 50 ships made him probably the wealthiest pirate in history.

26. I can’t swear that he was the only sitting member of the U.S. Senate to win a Grammy and have a record on the Billboard Top Forty, but if you can think of another….

SAM ERVIN? EVERETT DIRKSEN?

27. In addition to introducing the techniques of Italian Renaissance architecture to England, he also designed scenery for the elaborate masques of Ben Jonson.

28. She founded the League of Women Voters and was president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association when the Nineteenth Amendment finally passed

ALICE PAUL?

No -- CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT

29. The grocery store that he opened in the 1840s has since grown into a legendary retail establishment occupying five acres on Brompton Road.

HARROD?

30. His 35 year tenure was the longest of any principal conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic.

HERBERT VON KARAJAN

31. This poet did for Bill Clinton in 1993 what Robert Frost did for John F. Kennedy in 1961.

MAYA ANGELOU

32. In 1939, this American physicist won Thomas Watson’s approval to develop a device that would bring Charles Babbage’s ideas to fruition.

33. In 1956, this legendary performer won a Tony award for her role in a musical composed by her equally legendary husband.

LOTTE LENYA

34. As you may recall from my last general knowledge game, this evangelist is largely responsible for the fact that my former college roommate has been eagerly anticipating the end of the world for 48 years.

HAL LINDSEY?

35. Since the introduction of the current ranking system in 1973, this tennis player achieved the highest ranking of any Frenchman.

YANNICK NOAH

36. For two decades, this officer’s Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States served as the official manual of the U.S. military.

37. During his long career at the University of Chicago, this archaeologist popularized the term ‘Fertile Crescent,’ helped Howard Carter decipher the seals found in King Tut’s tomb, and became the first American to hold a university chair in Egyptology and Oriental History.

38. This superhero was introduced in 1941, discontinued in 1950, revived in 1964, and has not been out of print since.

CAPTAIN AMERICA

39. Around 1754 bc, this emperor had his most famous decree inscribed on a stele which is now housed in the Louvre.

HAMMURABI

40. Her career began at a local station in her home state of South Carolina; by the 1990s, you could watch her at least twice every weekday, on a national show biz newsmagazine and her own syndicated talk show.

LEEZA GIBBONS (Norville is from Georgia)

41. Her fossil finds at Lyme Regis won her renown and made her a key figure in the development of paleontology, but she was still barred from membership in the Geological Society of London.

42. This Nobel laureate first won recognition for his comic novels set in his native Trinidad.

43. In 1979, he became the first Canadian performer inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

HANK SNOW

44. And last year, he became the second Finnish player inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

TEEMU SELANNE

45. The writing team consisting, alphabetically, of these two longtime collaborators –

LOWELL GANZ

46. – has penned more than twenty films and numerous television shows, but they received their only Oscar nomination for a hit comedy about a girl with gills.

BABALOO MANDEL

(Grazer and Howard were the producers and Ron Howard certainly has more than one Oscar nomination)

47. In 1920, this cartoonist launched one of the first comic strips to focus on the new breed of ‘working girl’ – specifically, a single woman who had to support her parents and later became a widowed mother and successful fashion designer.

MARTIN BRANNER

48. In a little over a decade, this American supermodel has been a Victoria’s Secret Angel, appeared on the cover of the Swimsuit Issue, and served as a spokesmodel for both Harley Davidson and the NFL.

MARISA MILLER

49. There is some question as to whether she was really as wicked as her enemies and Robert Graves made her out to be, but there is no question that she was executed for allegedly conspiring against her own husband.

50. As Commander-in-Chief of French forces on the Western Front, this general was credited with the French victory – if you can call it that – at the Battle of the Marne.

PETAIN

51. This prominent Swiss theologian was an active leader in the Confessing Church, which opposed Hitler’s attempts to unite all German Protestant denominations into a single, pro-Nazi body.

52. The decisions of this longtime district and appeals court judge have been cited more often by the Supreme Court than those of any other lower court jurist.

LEARNED HAND

53. He resigned his 14-year presidency of an Ivy League University – which he skillfully guided through the Vietnam years – in order to accept a post at the Court of St. James.

54. This publisher staunchly opposed slavery in his newspaper, the National Era, but his greatest contribution to abolitionism was serializing a certain novel by a certain Mrs. Stowe.

WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON?

55. Despite his limited supply of cash, this rapper knows how to put together a f**king awesome wardrobe.

MACKLEMORE

56. This American writer is best remembered – if at all – for his best-selling comic novel about a hick army recruit, which was turned into an more successful Broadway play by Ira Levin, and then into an even more successful movie.

MAC HYMAN

57. Not one to sit on his barony, this hereditary British nobleman earned a Nobel Prize for his discovery of argon.

58. At the age of 21, this future PBA Hall of Famer became the youngest bowler ever to win the Tournament of Champions – a record that stood for forty years.

MARSHALL HOLMAN

59. This British actor won a Tony for his role in a Tom Stoppard play, an Oscar for his role as a real life accused murderer, one Emmy for his role as a real life Elizabethan nobleman, and two more Emmys for his skills as a narrator.

JEREMY IRONS

60. One of the first American women to earn a Ph.D. in engineering, she and her husband were pioneers in the field of industrial efficiency – a skill that also came in handy raising their twelve children.

LILLIAN GILBRETH

61. According to Milton, this demon was second in command to Satan.

BEELZEBUB

62. This French philosopher and political scientist turned Karl Marx on his ear with a book that called Marxism ‘the opium of the intellectuals.’

63. He was the first Brit to get one million subscribers on his YouTube channel, which is socoollike.

64. He was the second African American to serve in the U.S. Senate and the first to serve a full term; he also received eight votes for Vice President at the 1880 Republican National Convention.

65. There is some dispute over whether this young lady really was the first love of a future U.S. President, but there is no disputing the fact that she died of typhoid at the age of 22.

ANN RUTLEDGE

66. ’Personal — comely widow who owns a large farm in one of the finest districts in La Porte County, Indiana, desires to make the acquaintance of a gentleman equally well provided, with view of joining fortunes. No replies by letter considered unless sender is willing to follow answer with personal visit. Triflers need not apply.’ If you answered this ad, you were likely to become another victim of this statuesque serial killer, who may have offed between 25 and 40 people, including her own husbands and children. (A recent DNA test failed to settle the question of whether she faked her own death.)

67. This gestalt psychologist was best known for his conformity experiments, in which a subject asked to judge the relative lengths of lines was pressured into giving obviously wrong answers after a group of confederates all gave the same wrong answers.

68. Though he performed important research in aerodynamics, this French engineer will forever be associated with the iconic structure that bears his name. (And I do not use the word ‘iconic’ lightly.)

GUSTAV EIFFEL

69. This skilled comic actor spent most of his Hollywood career relegated to the same types of roles as Stepin Fetchit – most popularly in support of a detective who perpetrated a whole ‘nother set of ethnic stereotypes.

MANTAN MORELAND

70. This Swiss playwright took Broadway by storm in 1958 with a savagely cynical tale of vengeance that also marked the last stage appearance of the Lunts.

71. His performance on Benny Goodman’s signature hit helped turn the drums into a major solo instrument.

GENE KRUPA

72. I may or may not be related to this military hero of the First Crusade, who was proclaimed Prince of Galilee after the capture of Jerusalem and later became the subject of an opera.

TANCREDI

73. In 1981, a Sports Illustrated cover proclaimed him ‘The Best Defensive Lineman of All Time;’ eighteen years later Sporting News ranked him at #2.

JOHN HANNAH

74. Miss Jean Brodie’s favorite Italian artist, this late medieval painter was credited by Vasari with ‘introducing the technique of drawing accurately from life, which had been neglected for more than two hundred years.’

75. This environmental activist was the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

76. Though he was almost certainly not the villain and/or coward many popular accounts have made him out to be, this executive’s career never quite recovered from the criticism he received for not dying on April 15, 1912.

BRUCE ISMAY

77. His career as a journalist was relatively unremarkable until a 1965 article about the Hell’s Angels set him on a new path.

HUNTER S. THOMPSON

78. This physicist received the Nobel Prize for inventing a technique for photographically recording a light field – which you may know better by another term.

RÖENTGEN

79. This early Church Father, who served as archbishop of Constantinople at the turn of the 5th century, is recognized as a saint by the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglican churches.

ST. CYRIL?

80. Modeled after G.K. Chesterton, this amateur sleuth unlocked seemingly impossible mysteries in such novels as The Problem of the Wire Cage, The Three Coffins, and The Arabian Nights Murder.

DR. GIDEON FELL

81. No singer ever put more conviction or oomph into a lyric such as ‘Mercy mercy puddin’ pie’ than she did.

LAVERN BAKER

82. This American novelist is best remembered for his 1896 novel about the ‘Damnation’ of a young Methodist pastor.

83. Founder of the League for Physical Culture, he organized America’s first nudist outing on Labor Day 1929. (In case you were wondering, four men and three women stripped down for the event.)

84. Often considered America’s first scientific historian, he achieved renown with his 1843 history of the conquest of Mexico.

WILLIAM PRESCOTT

85. This silent screen beauty was nicknamed the ‘Orchid Lady.’

CORINNE GRIFFITH

86. Daley Thompson won and lost the world record in the decathlon four times, ultimately losing it for good to this American.

DAN O'BRIEN

87. Speaking of the ‘sick man of Europe’ – as we were 84 questions ago – it was this military leader who ultimately changed that status from ‘sick’ to ‘expired.’

T.E. LAWRENCE? ALLENBY?

88. An important precursor to Copernicus, this medieval priest and philosopher is better remembered today for his indecisive ass.

BURIDAN

89. This activist nun served for two years as chairperson of the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty.

SISTER HELEN PREJEAN

90. This Roman Catholic clergyman is the chief villain in what is BY FAR the most popular novel published in 1831.

CLAUDE FROLLO

91. He co-founded the company which produced the world’s first truly transistorized radio, and remained its chairman until suffering a stroke while playing tennis at the age of 72.

DAVID SARNOFF?

92. He wrote the lyrics for my all-time favorite musical – look to the left and you’ll see me performing in it – but his biggest hit was the first Broadway musical to run more than 3000 performances.

SHELDON HARNICK

93. This German chemist’s theorem – which states that, as absolute zero is approached, the entropy change ΔS for a chemical or physical transformation approaches 0 – was an important step in establishing the Third Law of Thermodynamics.

94. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, this admiral was removed from command of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and busted from four to two stars.

HUSBAND KIMMEL

95. A classic 1908 novel by this Scottish author features what is almost certainly the most likable rat in all of children’s literature.

KENNETH GRAHAME

96. In 1986, he became the first Latin American filmmaker to receive an Oscar nomination for Best Director.

HECTOR BABENCO (Kiss of the Spider Woman)

97. Major Enlightenment figures who sat for this neoclassical sculptor included Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, and Ben Franklin.

98. This journalist – who will celebrate his 96th birthday next month – served at various times as a correspondent for CBS, NBC, and the New York Times, but his tenure as spokesman for the U.S. State Department ended when he resigned in protest over the Reagan administration’s disinformation campaign against Muammar Gaddafi.

Isn't this BERNARD KALB?

99. This philosopher’s most iconic statement – and, as we know, I do not use the word ‘iconic’ lightly – is found in a treatise the full title of which is A Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting One's Reason and of Seeking Truth in the Sciences.

RENE DESCARTES

100. This scientist and politician – no, they are not mutually exclusive – went from chairing the Atomic Energy Commission to governing a state.

DIXY LEE RAY

101. A member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, he played more than 16,000 games in a professional career that spanned five decades – and not one of those games was played in the NBA.

MEADOWLARK LEMON? GOOSE TATUM? (Melly note: I think Tatum died too young to play five decades).

102. DJMQ: This dancer and choreographer enjoyed a 60+ year career interpreting and teaching the works and techniques of Martha Graham – and a 40+ marriage to Dr. No.

103. He became nationally known as the father of Cara, Madelyn, Aaden, Collin, Joel, Alexis, Hannah, and Leah.

JON GOSSELIN

104. Speaking of grocery stores – as we were 75 questions ago – the grocery store that he opened in 1883 has since grown into America’s largest supermarket chain by revenue.

KROGER?

105. In 1977, he became the second and last Spanish poet to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

107. This American physicist and his older Italian collaborator received the Nobel Prize for their discovery of the antiproton.

108. In an epic 1983 movie, this actor played a real-life hero who really, really, really did not want the press to use his first name.

BEN KINGSLEY

109. Born into slavery in New York, this reformer delivered a memorable speech at an 1851 women’s rights convention in Akron, Ohio. (The answer to the rhetorical question posed in that speech was ‘Yes.’)

SOJOURNER TRUTH

110. After fifteen years of refusing, for legal reasons, to perform any of his old songs, this rocker finally relented at a concert in 1987 because, as he said, ‘Bob Dylan asked me.’

JOHN FOGERTY?

111. Though a strong supporter of the Salem Witch Trials, this minister wrote to one of the judges warning him not to ‘lay more stress on pure spectral evidence than it will bear.’

COTTON MATHER

112. In 1952, this Australian tennis player won the first of her two Women’s Singles titles, the second of her four Mixed Doubles titles, and the tenth of her twelve Women’s Doubles titles at the Australian Open.

Can't be Margaret Court. The timeline is off.

113. The last president of France’s Third Republic, he said that he never resigned his position after the Nazi takeover because – with the National Assembly disbanded – there was no one to tender his resignation to.

114. This military commander attained the peerage as a result, not of his most famous victory, but of his leadership in the earlier Peninsular War.

115. This American impressionist is best known for a series of paintings with the Stars and Stripes as their central motif.

JASPER JOHNS

116. She is the head designer for the luxury goods company founded by her grandfather in 1913.

PRADA??

117. This puritanical steward becomes the victim of a cruel hoax and eventually stalks off stage swearing, ‘I’ll be reveng’d on the whole pack of you.’ (Regrettably, his creator never got around to writing Part Two: The Revenge.)

118. This explorer got his name on two bodies of water thanks to the expeditions he undertook at the behest of Peter the Great.

VITUS BERING

119. Regarding his influential 1905 novel, this writer commented, ‘I aimed at the public's heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach.’

UPTON SINCLAIR

120. She is the Oscar-winning daughter of a Tony-winning and Emmy-winning mother – and yes, that is the exact obverse of a clue in my last movie game.

GWYNETH PALTROW

121. The name of this British biologist will forever be linked with that of the younger American with whom he made a very important discovery in 1953

FRANCIS CRICK

122. Talk about your power couples: he won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to money theory, while his wife won the Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts on behalf of disarmament.

123. Christy Mathewson, Walter Johnson, and Cy Young were the only pitchers to beat this one into the Hall of Fame.

GROVER CLEVELAND ALEXANDER

124. When this composer published his most popular work in 1725, each sonata was accompanied by a sonnet, one of which reads in part, ‘On the flower-strewn meadow, with leafy branches/Rustling overhead, the goat-herd sleeps/His faithful dog beside him.’

VIVALDI

125. He completes the following list: Theodore Roosevelt; Jimmy Carter; Barack Obama.

WOODROW WILSON


ASSOCIATED WORD LIST
Genesis
Five
24
40
Bohemia
Weimar
Wyoming
Hawaii
Wisconsin
Tennessee
Long Island
Houston
Philadelphia
DC
Dragon
Owl
Falcon
Duck
Buck
Bunny
Cub
Giant
Pirate
Hitman
Sniper
Counterfeiter
Amateur
Communist
Commissioner
Dean
Homer
Vince
Charles
Shelley
Joy
Boone
Brown
Nixon
Psychology
Biochemistry
Rolling
Flying
Hanging
Kiss
Touch
Stroke
Velvet
Gown
Shoes
Ice Cream
Milk Shake
Chips
Borscht
Wall
Balcony
Radio
Tool
Instrument
Follies
Cabaret
Psycho
King of Kings
Speed
Race
Cruel


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 2:37 pm 
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Since I did most of the spelling "corrections" from memory, I went back and double-checked them. And found not one, but two errors. Cyrus McCormick is actually with an i and Gustave Eiffel does have the trailing "e" in his first name. I would have confidently picked the wrong spelling for a million dollars on both of them. Ah, hubris!

Oh, well. At least I didn't claim that I knew them all the time only after looking them up.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 2:52 pm 
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franktangredi wrote:
The third one with two alternates does not include the correct answer; the two men suggested played a role but someone else completed the job.

87. Speaking of the ‘sick man of Europe’ – as we were 84 questions ago – it was this military leader who ultimately changed that status from ‘sick’ to ‘expired.’

T.E. LAWRENCE? ALLENBY?


Actually, the Ottoman Empire hung around for a couple of years after World War I until it was overthrown in a civil war led by Kemal Ataturk, who is probably the person Frank is looking for.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 3:37 pm 
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Looking at some question marks and possible wrong answers (taking into account that sss just found the Sarnoff mistake and the Ottoman timing to give us two corrections).

13. Only three current female Senators have served longer than this former chair of the Agriculture Committee

NANCY KASSEBAUM? turns out Kassebaum never served as Agriculture chair. going with DEBBIE STABENOW of Michigan.

17. Using Moliere as a model, this 18th century dramatist played a key role in the transition of Italian comedy from the conventions of commedia dell'arte to the representation of real life. (His most popular was recently adapted and updated into a West End and Broadway hit.)

Can't be EUGENE IONESCO -- he is 20th C

54. This publisher staunchly opposed slavery in his newspaper, the National Era, but his greatest contribution to abolitionism was serializing a certain novel by a certain Mrs. Stowe.

WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON? Nope -- JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER

As I mentioned earlier ...

28. She founded the League of Women Voters and was president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association when the Nineteenth Amendment finally passed

ALICE PAUL? No -- CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT

So, the four above -- with sss's Sarnoff, give us the five wrong one-answer question marks.

Frank said:

Two of the ones that include two alternates include the correct answer, and in each case someone has already made a strong argument for the correct answer. The third one with two alternates does not include the correct answer; the two men suggested played a role but someone else completed the job.


So, these two, with sss's Ataturk, gives us the three right answers on the questions with two alternates.


26. I can’t swear that he was the only sitting member of the U.S. Senate to win a Grammy and have a record on the Billboard Top Forty, but if you can think of another….

SAM ERVIN? EVERETT DIRKSEN? Dirksen

101. A member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, he played more than 16,000 games in a professional career that spanned five decades – and not one of those games was played in the NBA.

MEADOWLARK LEMON - double-checked. Goose Tatum wasn't yet 50 when he died.

WRONG DEFINITES

50. As Commander-in-Chief of French forces on the Western Front, this general was credited with the French victory – if you can call it that – at the Battle of the Marne.

PETAIN

NOPE-- FERDINAND FOCH

14. This French philosopher and Nobel laureate developed his theory of ‘duration’ and his defense of free will partly as a response to the ideas of Kant.

JEAN-PAUL SARTRE

Could this be HENRI BERGSON?


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:42 pm 
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I'm wondering whether 57 is ERNEST LORD RUTHERFORD. --Bob

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mellytu74 wrote:
WRONG DEFINITES

50. As Commander-in-Chief of French forces on the Western Front, this general was credited with the French victory – if you can call it that – at the Battle of the Marne.

PETAIN

NOPE-- FERDINAND FOCH
Marshal Foch has had quite a career. Besides his military exploits, he was a Hall of Fame NFL running back, and now he's a rising basketball star with the 76ers. :lol:

mellytu74 wrote:
14. This French philosopher and Nobel laureate developed his theory of ‘duration’ and his defense of free will partly as a response to the ideas of Kant.

JEAN-PAUL SARTRE

Could this be HENRI BERGSON?
I'm amazed that there are two possible answers.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 6:44 pm 
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jarnon wrote:
mellytu74 wrote:
WRONG DEFINITES

50. As Commander-in-Chief of French forces on the Western Front, this general was credited with the French victory – if you can call it that – at the Battle of the Marne.

PETAIN

NOPE-- FERDINAND FOCH
Marshal Foch has had quite a career. Besides his military exploits, he was a Hall of Fame NFL running back, and now he's a rising basketball star with the 76ers. :lol:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

mellytu74 wrote:
14. This French philosopher and Nobel laureate developed his theory of ‘duration’ and his defense of free will partly as a response to the ideas of Kant.

JEAN-PAUL SARTRE

Could this be HENRI BERGSON?
I'm amazed that there are two possible answers.


:lol: :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2018 7:57 am 
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Bob78164 wrote:
I'm wondering whether 57 is ERNEST LORD RUTHERFORD. --Bob


Great guess, but I'm thinking it's Lord Rayleigh, the man who provided us with the definitive answer for why the sky is blue. I don't know his given name, though.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:47 pm 
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FYI - I am at 114th annual Philadelphia Sports Media/Writers Association dinner.


Will return to the puzzle Tuesday


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 7:32 pm 
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Fixed the problems that melly found, added a couple of identifications, and re-consolidated. Still not sure what the Tangredi could be, especially based on the title.


1) Apologies to all whose contributions were not in the first consolidation. Should have just waited until now (tough Thursday with funeral for friend's soin)

2) FRANK SAYS:

A) Of the definites, in one case you're definitely thinking of the right person, but the last name is wrong. [ this is DIEGO RIVERA].

B) Two others are wrong, and three are right but misspelled in ways that may matter [I think Mr. K took care of the misspelled names].

C) Those with two suggested answers each include the correct answer. The one with three suggested answers does not. [I think Marshall Holman takes care of the three wrong answers]/

D) Of those with a single answer with a question mark, seven are right and eight are wrong.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON CONSOLIDATION

Game #174: Puzzle Jam

Identify the 125 people in the clues below. Match them into 65 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words.

Five of the names will be used twice, each time in a different way. Some alternate matches are possible, but only one solution will allow you to use all the names and Associated Words.

1. He was the first Republican to win a majority of the popular vote in two successive Presidential elections.

ULYSSES GRANT

2. This Talmudic scholar is credited with saying, ‘What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow: this is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation.’

HILLEL

3. The role that won this actor his only Oscar nomination was actually a composite of several military leaders who played a role in a revolt against the ‘sick man of Europe.’

OMAR SHARIF

4. Perhaps second only to John Donne among metaphysical poets, he was also England’s leading practitioner of shaped poetry.

6. In one of the most controversial boxing matches of all time, this heavyweight was able to retain his title partly because his opponent failed to retire to a neutral corner at a critical moment.

GENE TUNNEY (Jack Dempsey is the fighter who didn’t go to the corner – this is The Long Count fight)

7. It’s not certain that this jazz great – renowned for his volatile temper – once got so angry with hecklers that he destroyed a $20,000 bass, but it’s apparently quite true that he once snapped at a noisy nightclub audience, ‘Isaac Stern doesn’t have to put up with this s**t.’

CHARLIE MINGUS

8. DJMQ: In 2013, this Romanian-born prima ballerina – accompanied by her dancer husband – left the Royal Ballet to become a principal dancer with the English National Ballet.
[Another DJMQ appears at #102. Someone may want to message JM to alert her that she’s on duty.)

9. One of this painter’s most ambitious works was destroyed due to its portrayal of Lenin, but fortunately, he – the painter, not Lenin – was able to reproduce it later on.

DIEGO RIVERA

10. He has been played on screen by two different actors who each won two consecutive Oscars, one of whom won the first of his two consecutive Oscars for playing him. Got that?

BEN BRADLEE

11. This Black Panther went from convicted rapist, to Presidential candidate of the same left-wing party that later nominated Dr. Spock, to conservative Republican … and from Muslim to Christian to Moonie to Mormon.

ELDRIDGE CLEAVER

12. Eighteen years after this entrepreneur’s death, the company he founded was merged with four other companies to form the International Harvester Company.

CYRUS MCCORMICK?

13. Only three current female Senators have served longer than this former chair of the Agriculture Committee

DEBBIE STABENOW

14. This French philosopher and Nobel laureate developed his theory of ‘duration’ and his defense of free will partly as a response to the ideas of Kant.

HENRI BERGSON

15. After receiving Oscar nominations for writing and directing his breakthrough film, he seemed to enter a steady decline, earning four Razzies for writing, directing, and acting. (He was also nominated for writing and directing a movie that has a special place in the Bored’s heart.)

M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN

16. A speech he delivered at mass on September 16, 1810, turned this Roman Catholic priest into a revolutionary military leader.

17. Using Moliere as a model, this 18th century dramatist played a key role in the transition of Italian comedy from the conventions of commedia dell'arte to the representation of real life. (His most popular was recently adapted and updated into a West End and Broadway hit.)



18. In an influential 1942 book, this British-American anthropologist rejected the concept of race, calling it ‘man’s most dangerous myth.’

ASHLEY MONTAGU

19. The first misfortune of his life took place at the moment of his conception, when his mother asked his father if he had remembered to wind the clock; an even greater misfortune came a few years later, when a window sash fell just as he was urinating out a window.

TRISTRAM SHANDY?

20. While testifying in the Senate against requiring parental warning labels on record albums, this heavy metal vocalist – who grew up only a few miles away from me – surprised both Tipper Gore and his fans by stating that he was raised a Christian and still adhered to Christian principles.

DEE SNIDER

21. This 17th century mathematician contributed to calculus, analytic geometry, and number theory, but he is perhaps best remembered for something he jotted down in the margins of an ancient Greek textbook.

PIERRE FERMAT

22. This infielder was the first Puerto Rican to be named Rookie of the Year by either league

ORLANDO CEPEDA

23. In December 2017, this winner of three James Beard awards became the most prominent celebrity chef taken down by the Weinstein Effect.

MARIO BATALI

24. He was the first Asian American in space.

ELLISON ONIZUKA

25. Despite his nickname of ‘Black Sam,’ he is generally considered one of the least ruthless of the great 18th century pirates; despite the fact that his career in piracy lasted little over the year, his capture of more than 50 ships made him probably the wealthiest pirate in history.

26. I can’t swear that he was the only sitting member of the U.S. Senate to win a Grammy and have a record on the Billboard Top Forty, but if you can think of another….

EVERETT DIRKSEN

27. In addition to introducing the techniques of Italian Renaissance architecture to England, he also designed scenery for the elaborate masques of Ben Jonson.

28. She founded the League of Women Voters and was president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association when the Nineteenth Amendment finally passed

CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT

29. The grocery store that he opened in the 1840s has since grown into a legendary retail establishment occupying five acres on Brompton Road.

HARROD?

30. His 35 year tenure was the longest of any principal conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic.

HERBERT VON KARAJAN

31. This poet did for Bill Clinton in 1993 what Robert Frost did for John F. Kennedy in 1961.

MAYA ANGELOU

32. In 1939, this American physicist won Thomas Watson’s approval to develop a device that would bring Charles Babbage’s ideas to fruition.

33. In 1956, this legendary performer won a Tony award for her role in a musical composed by her equally legendary husband.

LOTTE LENYA

34. As you may recall from my last general knowledge game, this evangelist is largely responsible for the fact that my former college roommate has been eagerly anticipating the end of the world for 48 years.

HAL LINDSEY?

35. Since the introduction of the current ranking system in 1973, this tennis player achieved the highest ranking of any Frenchman.

YANNICK NOAH

36. For two decades, this officer’s Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States served as the official manual of the U.S. military.

37. During his long career at the University of Chicago, this archaeologist popularized the term ‘Fertile Crescent,’ helped Howard Carter decipher the seals found in King Tut’s tomb, and became the first American to hold a university chair in Egyptology and Oriental History.

38. This superhero was introduced in 1941, discontinued in 1950, revived in 1964, and has not been out of print since.

CAPTAIN AMERICA

39. Around 1754 bc, this emperor had his most famous decree inscribed on a stele which is now housed in the Louvre.

HAMMURABI

40. Her career began at a local station in her home state of South Carolina; by the 1990s, you could watch her at least twice every weekday, on a national show biz newsmagazine and her own syndicated talk show.

LEEZA GIBBONS (Norville is from Georgia)

41. Her fossil finds at Lyme Regis won her renown and made her a key figure in the development of paleontology, but she was still barred from membership in the Geological Society of London.

42. This Nobel laureate first won recognition for his comic novels set in his native Trinidad.

43. In 1979, he became the first Canadian performer inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

HANK SNOW

44. And last year, he became the second Finnish player inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

TEEMU SELANNE

45. The writing team consisting, alphabetically, of these two longtime collaborators –

LOWELL GANZ

46. – has penned more than twenty films and numerous television shows, but they received their only Oscar nomination for a hit comedy about a girl with gills.

BABALOO MANDEL

(Grazer and Howard were the producers and Ron Howard certainly has more than one Oscar nomination)

47. In 1920, this cartoonist launched one of the first comic strips to focus on the new breed of ‘working girl’ – specifically, a single woman who had to support her parents and later became a widowed mother and successful fashion designer.

MARTIN BRANNER

48. In a little over a decade, this American supermodel has been a Victoria’s Secret Angel, appeared on the cover of the Swimsuit Issue, and served as a spokesmodel for both Harley Davidson and the NFL.

MARISA MILLER

49. There is some question as to whether she was really as wicked as her enemies and Robert Graves made her out to be, but there is no question that she was executed for allegedly conspiring against her own husband.

50. As Commander-in-Chief of French forces on the Western Front, this general was credited with the French victory – if you can call it that – at the Battle of the Marne.

FERDINAND FOCH

51. This prominent Swiss theologian was an active leader in the Confessing Church, which opposed Hitler’s attempts to unite all German Protestant denominations into a single, pro-Nazi body.

52. The decisions of this longtime district and appeals court judge have been cited more often by the Supreme Court than those of any other lower court jurist.

LEARNED HAND

53. He resigned his 14-year presidency of an Ivy League University – which he skillfully guided through the Vietnam years – in order to accept a post at the Court of St. James.

54. This publisher staunchly opposed slavery in his newspaper, the National Era, but his greatest contribution to abolitionism was serializing a certain novel by a certain Mrs. Stowe.

JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER

55. Despite his limited supply of cash, this rapper knows how to put together a f**king awesome wardrobe.

MACKLEMORE (real name: BEN HAGGERTY)

56. This American writer is best remembered – if at all – for his best-selling comic novel about a hick army recruit, which was turned into an more successful Broadway play by Ira Levin, and then into an even more successful movie.

MAC HYMAN

57. Not one to sit on his barony, this hereditary British nobleman earned a Nobel Prize for his discovery of argon.

LORD RAYLEIGH

58. At the age of 21, this future PBA Hall of Famer became the youngest bowler ever to win the Tournament of Champions – a record that stood for forty years.

MARSHALL HOLMAN

59. This British actor won a Tony for his role in a Tom Stoppard play, an Oscar for his role as a real life accused murderer, one Emmy for his role as a real life Elizabethan nobleman, and two more Emmys for his skills as a narrator.

JEREMY IRONS

60. One of the first American women to earn a Ph.D. in engineering, she and her husband were pioneers in the field of industrial efficiency – a skill that also came in handy raising their twelve children.

LILLIAN GILBRETH

61. According to Milton, this demon was second in command to Satan.

BEELZEBUB

62. This French philosopher and political scientist turned Karl Marx on his ear with a book that called Marxism ‘the opium of the intellectuals.’

63. He was the first Brit to get one million subscribers on his YouTube channel, which is socoollike.

64. He was the second African American to serve in the U.S. Senate and the first to serve a full term; he also received eight votes for Vice President at the 1880 Republican National Convention.

65. There is some dispute over whether this young lady really was the first love of a future U.S. President, but there is no disputing the fact that she died of typhoid at the age of 22.

ANN RUTLEDGE

66. ’Personal — comely widow who owns a large farm in one of the finest districts in La Porte County, Indiana, desires to make the acquaintance of a gentleman equally well provided, with view of joining fortunes. No replies by letter considered unless sender is willing to follow answer with personal visit. Triflers need not apply.’ If you answered this ad, you were likely to become another victim of this statuesque serial killer, who may have offed between 25 and 40 people, including her own husbands and children. (A recent DNA test failed to settle the question of whether she faked her own death.)

67. This gestalt psychologist was best known for his conformity experiments, in which a subject asked to judge the relative lengths of lines was pressured into giving obviously wrong answers after a group of confederates all gave the same wrong answers.

68. Though he performed important research in aerodynamics, this French engineer will forever be associated with the iconic structure that bears his name. (And I do not use the word ‘iconic’ lightly.)

GUSTAVE EIFFEL

69. This skilled comic actor spent most of his Hollywood career relegated to the same types of roles as Stepin Fetchit – most popularly in support of a detective who perpetrated a whole ‘nother set of ethnic stereotypes.

MANTAN MORELAND

70. This Swiss playwright took Broadway by storm in 1958 with a savagely cynical tale of vengeance that also marked the last stage appearance of the Lunts.

71. His performance on Benny Goodman’s signature hit helped turn the drums into a major solo instrument.

GENE KRUPA

72. I may or may not be related to this military hero of the First Crusade, who was proclaimed Prince of Galilee after the capture of Jerusalem and later became the subject of an opera.

TANCREDI (OR TANCRED)

73. In 1981, a Sports Illustrated cover proclaimed him ‘The Best Defensive Lineman of All Time;’ eighteen years later Sporting News ranked him at #2.

JOHN HANNAH

74. Miss Jean Brodie’s favorite Italian artist, this late medieval painter was credited by Vasari with ‘introducing the technique of drawing accurately from life, which had been neglected for more than two hundred years.’

75. This environmental activist was the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

76. Though he was almost certainly not the villain and/or coward many popular accounts have made him out to be, this executive’s career never quite recovered from the criticism he received for not dying on April 15, 1912.

BRUCE ISMAY

77. His career as a journalist was relatively unremarkable until a 1965 article about the Hell’s Angels set him on a new path.

HUNTER S. THOMPSON

78. This physicist received the Nobel Prize for inventing a technique for photographically recording a light field – which you may know better by another term.

WILHELM RÖENTGEN (ALSO SOMETIMES SPELLED RONTGEN)

79. This early Church Father, who served as archbishop of Constantinople at the turn of the 5th century, is recognized as a saint by the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglican churches.

ST. CYRIL?

80. Modeled after G.K. Chesterton, this amateur sleuth unlocked seemingly impossible mysteries in such novels as The Problem of the Wire Cage, The Three Coffins, and The Arabian Nights Murder.

DR. GIDEON FELL

81. No singer ever put more conviction or oomph into a lyric such as ‘Mercy mercy puddin’ pie’ than she did.

LAVERN BAKER

82. This American novelist is best remembered for his 1896 novel about the ‘Damnation’ of a young Methodist pastor.

83. Founder of the League for Physical Culture, he organized America’s first nudist outing on Labor Day 1929. (In case you were wondering, four men and three women stripped down for the event.)

84. Often considered America’s first scientific historian, he achieved renown with his 1843 history of the conquest of Mexico.

WILLIAM PRESCOTT

85. This silent screen beauty was nicknamed the ‘Orchid Lady.’

CORINNE GRIFFITH

86. Daley Thompson won and lost the world record in the decathlon four times, ultimately losing it for good to this American.

DAN O'BRIEN

87. Speaking of the ‘sick man of Europe’ – as we were 84 questions ago – it was this military leader who ultimately changed that status from ‘sick’ to ‘expired.’

KEMAL ATATURK

88. An important precursor to Copernicus, this medieval priest and philosopher is better remembered today for his indecisive ass.

JEAN BURIDAN

89. This activist nun served for two years as chairperson of the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty.

SISTER HELEN PREJEAN

90. This Roman Catholic clergyman is the chief villain in what is BY FAR the most popular novel published in 1831.

CLAUDE FROLLO

91. He co-founded the company which produced the world’s first truly transistorized radio, and remained its chairman until suffering a stroke while playing tennis at the age of 72.

AKIO MORITA

92. He wrote the lyrics for my all-time favorite musical – look to the left and you’ll see me performing in it – but his biggest hit was the first Broadway musical to run more than 3000 performances.

SHELDON HARNICK

93. This German chemist’s theorem – which states that, as absolute zero is approached, the entropy change ΔS for a chemical or physical transformation approaches 0 – was an important step in establishing the Third Law of Thermodynamics.

WALTHER NERNST

94. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, this admiral was removed from command of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and busted from four to two stars.

HUSBAND KIMMEL

95. A classic 1908 novel by this Scottish author features what is almost certainly the most likable rat in all of children’s literature.

KENNETH GRAHAME

96. In 1986, he became the first Latin American filmmaker to receive an Oscar nomination for Best Director.

HECTOR BABENCO (Kiss of the Spider Woman)

97. Major Enlightenment figures who sat for this neoclassical sculptor included Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, and Ben Franklin.

98. This journalist – who will celebrate his 96th birthday next month – served at various times as a correspondent for CBS, NBC, and the New York Times, but his tenure as spokesman for the U.S. State Department ended when he resigned in protest over the Reagan administration’s disinformation campaign against Muammar Gaddafi.

Isn't this BERNARD KALB?

99. This philosopher’s most iconic statement – and, as we know, I do not use the word ‘iconic’ lightly – is found in a treatise the full title of which is A Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting One's Reason and of Seeking Truth in the Sciences.

RENE DESCARTES

100. This scientist and politician – no, they are not mutually exclusive – went from chairing the Atomic Energy Commission to governing a state.

DIXY LEE RAY

101. A member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, he played more than 16,000 games in a professional career that spanned five decades – and not one of those games was played in the NBA.

MEADOWLARK LEMON

102. DJMQ: This dancer and choreographer enjoyed a 60+ year career interpreting and teaching the works and techniques of Martha Graham – and a 40+ marriage to Dr. No.
PEARL LANG

103. He became nationally known as the father of Cara, Madelyn, Aaden, Collin, Joel, Alexis, Hannah, and Leah.

JON GOSSELIN

104. Speaking of grocery stores – as we were 75 questions ago – the grocery store that he opened in 1883 has since grown into America’s largest supermarket chain by revenue.

BERNARD KROGER

105. In 1977, he became the second and last Spanish poet to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

107. This American physicist and his older Italian collaborator received the Nobel Prize for their discovery of the antiproton.

108. In an epic 1983 movie, this actor played a real-life hero who really, really, really did not want the press to use his first name.

BEN KINGSLEY

109. Born into slavery in New York, this reformer delivered a memorable speech at an 1851 women’s rights convention in Akron, Ohio. (The answer to the rhetorical question posed in that speech was ‘Yes.’)

SOJOURNER TRUTH

110. After fifteen years of refusing, for legal reasons, to perform any of his old songs, this rocker finally relented at a concert in 1987 because, as he said, ‘Bob Dylan asked me.’

JOHN FOGERTY

111. Though a strong supporter of the Salem Witch Trials, this minister wrote to one of the judges warning him not to ‘lay more stress on pure spectral evidence than it will bear.’

COTTON MATHER

112. In 1952, this Australian tennis player won the first of her two Women’s Singles titles, the second of her four Mixed Doubles titles, and the tenth of her twelve Women’s Doubles titles at the Australian Open.


113. The last president of France’s Third Republic, he said that he never resigned his position after the Nazi takeover because – with the National Assembly disbanded – there was no one to tender his resignation to.

114. This military commander attained the peerage as a result, not of his most famous victory, but of his leadership in the earlier Peninsular War.

DUKE OF WELLINGTON

115. This American impressionist is best known for a series of paintings with the Stars and Stripes as their central motif.

JASPER JOHNS

116. She is the head designer for the luxury goods company founded by her grandfather in 1913.

MIUCCIA PRADA

117. This puritanical steward becomes the victim of a cruel hoax and eventually stalks off stage swearing, ‘I’ll be reveng’d on the whole pack of you.’ (Regrettably, his creator never got around to writing Part Two: The Revenge.)

MALVOLIO

118. This explorer got his name on two bodies of water thanks to the expeditions he undertook at the behest of Peter the Great.

VITUS BERING

119. Regarding his influential 1905 novel, this writer commented, ‘I aimed at the public's heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach.’

UPTON SINCLAIR

120. She is the Oscar-winning daughter of a Tony-winning and Emmy-winning mother – and yes, that is the exact obverse of a clue in my last movie game.

GWYNETH PALTROW

121. The name of this British biologist will forever be linked with that of the younger American with whom he made a very important discovery in 1953

FRANCIS CRICK

122. Talk about your power couples: he won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to money theory, while his wife won the Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts on behalf of disarmament.

123. Christy Mathewson, Walter Johnson, and Cy Young were the only pitchers to beat this one into the Hall of Fame.

GROVER CLEVELAND ALEXANDER

124. When this composer published his most popular work in 1725, each sonata was accompanied by a sonnet, one of which reads in part, ‘On the flower-strewn meadow, with leafy branches/Rustling overhead, the goat-herd sleeps/His faithful dog beside him.’

ANTONIO VIVALDI

125. He completes the following list: Theodore Roosevelt; Jimmy Carter; Barack Obama.

WOODROW WILSON


ASSOCIATED WORD LIST
Genesis
Five
24
40
Bohemia
Weimar
Wyoming
Hawaii
Wisconsin
Tennessee
Long Island
Houston
Philadelphia
DC
Dragon
Owl
Falcon
Duck
Buck
Bunny
Cub
Giant
Pirate
Hitman
Sniper
Counterfeiter
Amateur
Communist
Commissioner
Dean
Homer
Vince
Charles
Shelley
Joy
Boone
Brown
Nixon
Psychology
Biochemistry
Rolling
Flying
Hanging
Kiss
Touch
Stroke
Velvet
Gown
Shoes
Ice Cream
Milk Shake
Chips
Borscht
Wall
Balcony
Radio
Tool
Instrument
Follies
Cabaret
Psycho
King of Kings
Speed
Race
Cruel

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The real question of government versus private enterprise is argued on too philosophical and abstract a basis. Theoretically, planning may be good. But nobody has ever figured out the cause of government stupidity—and until they do (and find the cure), all ideal plans will fall into quicksand. -- Richard Feynman, "What do you Care what other People Think?"


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 8:02 pm 
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I'm not sure whether this has any significance to the Tangredi, but the title is reminiscent of Pearl Jam. --Bob

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 9:39 pm 
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Five of the definites are wrong. In one case, there is an ambiguity in the question, since I didn't realize that Whittier was an associate editor on the same abolitionist newspaper as the person I had in mind. So it's only fair for me to clarify that one.

On #108, it's also fair to say that "epic" may have been a misleading word for the film, though I've seen it described as such. However, Gandhi came out in 1982 anyway. And the scene I'm referring to is a fairly memorable moment in the movie.

Of the remaining wrong definites: In one case, the person listed never held the position in the question. In another, the description does not match the accomplishment of the person guessed. And in the third case, the person guessed does not fit the classification mentioned for the person in the clue.

There are two other answers where, while the right person is given, the name is incomplete in a significant way.

Of the answers with question marks, all but one are correct.

mrkelley23 wrote:
Fixed the problems that melly found, added a couple of identifications, and re-consolidated. Still not sure what the Tangredi could be, especially based on the title.


1) Apologies to all whose contributions were not in the first consolidation. Should have just waited until now (tough Thursday with funeral for friend's soin)

2) FRANK SAYS:

A) Of the definites, in one case you're definitely thinking of the right person, but the last name is wrong. [ this is DIEGO RIVERA].

B) Two others are wrong, and three are right but misspelled in ways that may matter [I think Mr. K took care of the misspelled names].

C) Those with two suggested answers each include the correct answer. The one with three suggested answers does not. [I think Marshall Holman takes care of the three wrong answers]/

D) Of those with a single answer with a question mark, seven are right and eight are wrong.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON CONSOLIDATION

Game #174: Puzzle Jam

Identify the 125 people in the clues below. Match them into 65 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words.

Five of the names will be used twice, each time in a different way. Some alternate matches are possible, but only one solution will allow you to use all the names and Associated Words.

1. He was the first Republican to win a majority of the popular vote in two successive Presidential elections.

ULYSSES GRANT

2. This Talmudic scholar is credited with saying, ‘What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow: this is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation.’

HILLEL

3. The role that won this actor his only Oscar nomination was actually a composite of several military leaders who played a role in a revolt against the ‘sick man of Europe.’

OMAR SHARIF

4. Perhaps second only to John Donne among metaphysical poets, he was also England’s leading practitioner of shaped poetry.

6. In one of the most controversial boxing matches of all time, this heavyweight was able to retain his title partly because his opponent failed to retire to a neutral corner at a critical moment.

GENE TUNNEY (Jack Dempsey is the fighter who didn’t go to the corner – this is The Long Count fight)

7. It’s not certain that this jazz great – renowned for his volatile temper – once got so angry with hecklers that he destroyed a $20,000 bass, but it’s apparently quite true that he once snapped at a noisy nightclub audience, ‘Isaac Stern doesn’t have to put up with this s**t.’

CHARLIE MINGUS

8. DJMQ: In 2013, this Romanian-born prima ballerina – accompanied by her dancer husband – left the Royal Ballet to become a principal dancer with the English National Ballet.
[Another DJMQ appears at #102. Someone may want to message JM to alert her that she’s on duty.)

9. One of this painter’s most ambitious works was destroyed due to its portrayal of Lenin, but fortunately, he – the painter, not Lenin – was able to reproduce it later on.

DIEGO RIVERA

10. He has been played on screen by two different actors who each won two consecutive Oscars, one of whom won the first of his two consecutive Oscars for playing him. Got that?

BEN BRADLEE

11. This Black Panther went from convicted rapist, to Presidential candidate of the same left-wing party that later nominated Dr. Spock, to conservative Republican … and from Muslim to Christian to Moonie to Mormon.

ELDRIDGE CLEAVER

12. Eighteen years after this entrepreneur’s death, the company he founded was merged with four other companies to form the International Harvester Company.

CYRUS MCCORMICK?

13. Only three current female Senators have served longer than this former chair of the Agriculture Committee

DEBBIE STABENOW

14. This French philosopher and Nobel laureate developed his theory of ‘duration’ and his defense of free will partly as a response to the ideas of Kant.

HENRI BERGSON

15. After receiving Oscar nominations for writing and directing his breakthrough film, he seemed to enter a steady decline, earning four Razzies for writing, directing, and acting. (He was also nominated for writing and directing a movie that has a special place in the Bored’s heart.)

M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN

16. A speech he delivered at mass on September 16, 1810, turned this Roman Catholic priest into a revolutionary military leader.

17. Using Moliere as a model, this 18th century dramatist played a key role in the transition of Italian comedy from the conventions of commedia dell'arte to the representation of real life. (His most popular was recently adapted and updated into a West End and Broadway hit.)



18. In an influential 1942 book, this British-American anthropologist rejected the concept of race, calling it ‘man’s most dangerous myth.’

ASHLEY MONTAGU

19. The first misfortune of his life took place at the moment of his conception, when his mother asked his father if he had remembered to wind the clock; an even greater misfortune came a few years later, when a window sash fell just as he was urinating out a window.

TRISTRAM SHANDY?

20. While testifying in the Senate against requiring parental warning labels on record albums, this heavy metal vocalist – who grew up only a few miles away from me – surprised both Tipper Gore and his fans by stating that he was raised a Christian and still adhered to Christian principles.

DEE SNIDER

21. This 17th century mathematician contributed to calculus, analytic geometry, and number theory, but he is perhaps best remembered for something he jotted down in the margins of an ancient Greek textbook.

PIERRE FERMAT

22. This infielder was the first Puerto Rican to be named Rookie of the Year by either league

ORLANDO CEPEDA

23. In December 2017, this winner of three James Beard awards became the most prominent celebrity chef taken down by the Weinstein Effect.

MARIO BATALI

24. He was the first Asian American in space.

ELLISON ONIZUKA

25. Despite his nickname of ‘Black Sam,’ he is generally considered one of the least ruthless of the great 18th century pirates; despite the fact that his career in piracy lasted little over the year, his capture of more than 50 ships made him probably the wealthiest pirate in history.

26. I can’t swear that he was the only sitting member of the U.S. Senate to win a Grammy and have a record on the Billboard Top Forty, but if you can think of another….

EVERETT DIRKSEN

27. In addition to introducing the techniques of Italian Renaissance architecture to England, he also designed scenery for the elaborate masques of Ben Jonson.

28. She founded the League of Women Voters and was president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association when the Nineteenth Amendment finally passed

CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT

29. The grocery store that he opened in the 1840s has since grown into a legendary retail establishment occupying five acres on Brompton Road.

HARROD?

30. His 35 year tenure was the longest of any principal conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic.

HERBERT VON KARAJAN

31. This poet did for Bill Clinton in 1993 what Robert Frost did for John F. Kennedy in 1961.

MAYA ANGELOU

32. In 1939, this American physicist won Thomas Watson’s approval to develop a device that would bring Charles Babbage’s ideas to fruition.

33. In 1956, this legendary performer won a Tony award for her role in a musical composed by her equally legendary husband.

LOTTE LENYA

34. As you may recall from my last general knowledge game, this evangelist is largely responsible for the fact that my former college roommate has been eagerly anticipating the end of the world for 48 years.

HAL LINDSEY?

35. Since the introduction of the current ranking system in 1973, this tennis player achieved the highest ranking of any Frenchman.

YANNICK NOAH

36. For two decades, this officer’s Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States served as the official manual of the U.S. military.

37. During his long career at the University of Chicago, this archaeologist popularized the term ‘Fertile Crescent,’ helped Howard Carter decipher the seals found in King Tut’s tomb, and became the first American to hold a university chair in Egyptology and Oriental History.

38. This superhero was introduced in 1941, discontinued in 1950, revived in 1964, and has not been out of print since.

CAPTAIN AMERICA

39. Around 1754 bc, this emperor had his most famous decree inscribed on a stele which is now housed in the Louvre.

HAMMURABI

40. Her career began at a local station in her home state of South Carolina; by the 1990s, you could watch her at least twice every weekday, on a national show biz newsmagazine and her own syndicated talk show.

LEEZA GIBBONS (Norville is from Georgia)

41. Her fossil finds at Lyme Regis won her renown and made her a key figure in the development of paleontology, but she was still barred from membership in the Geological Society of London.

42. This Nobel laureate first won recognition for his comic novels set in his native Trinidad.

43. In 1979, he became the first Canadian performer inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

HANK SNOW

44. And last year, he became the second Finnish player inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

TEEMU SELANNE

45. The writing team consisting, alphabetically, of these two longtime collaborators –

LOWELL GANZ

46. – has penned more than twenty films and numerous television shows, but they received their only Oscar nomination for a hit comedy about a girl with gills.

BABALOO MANDEL

(Grazer and Howard were the producers and Ron Howard certainly has more than one Oscar nomination)

47. In 1920, this cartoonist launched one of the first comic strips to focus on the new breed of ‘working girl’ – specifically, a single woman who had to support her parents and later became a widowed mother and successful fashion designer.

MARTIN BRANNER

48. In a little over a decade, this American supermodel has been a Victoria’s Secret Angel, appeared on the cover of the Swimsuit Issue, and served as a spokesmodel for both Harley Davidson and the NFL.

MARISA MILLER

49. There is some question as to whether she was really as wicked as her enemies and Robert Graves made her out to be, but there is no question that she was executed for allegedly conspiring against her own husband.

50. As Commander-in-Chief of French forces on the Western Front, this general was credited with the French victory – if you can call it that – at the Battle of the Marne.

FERDINAND FOCH

51. This prominent Swiss theologian was an active leader in the Confessing Church, which opposed Hitler’s attempts to unite all German Protestant denominations into a single, pro-Nazi body.

52. The decisions of this longtime district and appeals court judge have been cited more often by the Supreme Court than those of any other lower court jurist.

LEARNED HAND

53. He resigned his 14-year presidency of an Ivy League University – which he skillfully guided through the Vietnam years – in order to accept a post at the Court of St. James.

54. This publisher staunchly opposed slavery in his newspaper, the National Era, but his greatest contribution to abolitionism was serializing a certain novel by a certain Mrs. Stowe.

JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER

55. Despite his limited supply of cash, this rapper knows how to put together a f**king awesome wardrobe.

MACKLEMORE (real name: BEN HAGGERTY)

56. This American writer is best remembered – if at all – for his best-selling comic novel about a hick army recruit, which was turned into an more successful Broadway play by Ira Levin, and then into an even more successful movie.

MAC HYMAN

57. Not one to sit on his barony, this hereditary British nobleman earned a Nobel Prize for his discovery of argon.

LORD RAYLEIGH

58. At the age of 21, this future PBA Hall of Famer became the youngest bowler ever to win the Tournament of Champions – a record that stood for forty years.

MARSHALL HOLMAN

59. This British actor won a Tony for his role in a Tom Stoppard play, an Oscar for his role as a real life accused murderer, one Emmy for his role as a real life Elizabethan nobleman, and two more Emmys for his skills as a narrator.

JEREMY IRONS

60. One of the first American women to earn a Ph.D. in engineering, she and her husband were pioneers in the field of industrial efficiency – a skill that also came in handy raising their twelve children.

LILLIAN GILBRETH

61. According to Milton, this demon was second in command to Satan.

BEELZEBUB

62. This French philosopher and political scientist turned Karl Marx on his ear with a book that called Marxism ‘the opium of the intellectuals.’

63. He was the first Brit to get one million subscribers on his YouTube channel, which is socoollike.

64. He was the second African American to serve in the U.S. Senate and the first to serve a full term; he also received eight votes for Vice President at the 1880 Republican National Convention.

65. There is some dispute over whether this young lady really was the first love of a future U.S. President, but there is no disputing the fact that she died of typhoid at the age of 22.

ANN RUTLEDGE

66. ’Personal — comely widow who owns a large farm in one of the finest districts in La Porte County, Indiana, desires to make the acquaintance of a gentleman equally well provided, with view of joining fortunes. No replies by letter considered unless sender is willing to follow answer with personal visit. Triflers need not apply.’ If you answered this ad, you were likely to become another victim of this statuesque serial killer, who may have offed between 25 and 40 people, including her own husbands and children. (A recent DNA test failed to settle the question of whether she faked her own death.)

67. This gestalt psychologist was best known for his conformity experiments, in which a subject asked to judge the relative lengths of lines was pressured into giving obviously wrong answers after a group of confederates all gave the same wrong answers.

68. Though he performed important research in aerodynamics, this French engineer will forever be associated with the iconic structure that bears his name. (And I do not use the word ‘iconic’ lightly.)

GUSTAVE EIFFEL

69. This skilled comic actor spent most of his Hollywood career relegated to the same types of roles as Stepin Fetchit – most popularly in support of a detective who perpetrated a whole ‘nother set of ethnic stereotypes.

MANTAN MORELAND

70. This Swiss playwright took Broadway by storm in 1958 with a savagely cynical tale of vengeance that also marked the last stage appearance of the Lunts.

71. His performance on Benny Goodman’s signature hit helped turn the drums into a major solo instrument.

GENE KRUPA

72. I may or may not be related to this military hero of the First Crusade, who was proclaimed Prince of Galilee after the capture of Jerusalem and later became the subject of an opera.

TANCREDI (OR TANCRED)

73. In 1981, a Sports Illustrated cover proclaimed him ‘The Best Defensive Lineman of All Time;’ eighteen years later Sporting News ranked him at #2.

JOHN HANNAH

74. Miss Jean Brodie’s favorite Italian artist, this late medieval painter was credited by Vasari with ‘introducing the technique of drawing accurately from life, which had been neglected for more than two hundred years.’

75. This environmental activist was the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

76. Though he was almost certainly not the villain and/or coward many popular accounts have made him out to be, this executive’s career never quite recovered from the criticism he received for not dying on April 15, 1912.

BRUCE ISMAY

77. His career as a journalist was relatively unremarkable until a 1965 article about the Hell’s Angels set him on a new path.

HUNTER S. THOMPSON

78. This physicist received the Nobel Prize for inventing a technique for photographically recording a light field – which you may know better by another term.

WILHELM RÖENTGEN (ALSO SOMETIMES SPELLED RONTGEN)

79. This early Church Father, who served as archbishop of Constantinople at the turn of the 5th century, is recognized as a saint by the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglican churches.

ST. CYRIL?

80. Modeled after G.K. Chesterton, this amateur sleuth unlocked seemingly impossible mysteries in such novels as The Problem of the Wire Cage, The Three Coffins, and The Arabian Nights Murder.

DR. GIDEON FELL

81. No singer ever put more conviction or oomph into a lyric such as ‘Mercy mercy puddin’ pie’ than she did.

LAVERN BAKER

82. This American novelist is best remembered for his 1896 novel about the ‘Damnation’ of a young Methodist pastor.

83. Founder of the League for Physical Culture, he organized America’s first nudist outing on Labor Day 1929. (In case you were wondering, four men and three women stripped down for the event.)

84. Often considered America’s first scientific historian, he achieved renown with his 1843 history of the conquest of Mexico.

WILLIAM PRESCOTT

85. This silent screen beauty was nicknamed the ‘Orchid Lady.’

CORINNE GRIFFITH

86. Daley Thompson won and lost the world record in the decathlon four times, ultimately losing it for good to this American.

DAN O'BRIEN

87. Speaking of the ‘sick man of Europe’ – as we were 84 questions ago – it was this military leader who ultimately changed that status from ‘sick’ to ‘expired.’

KEMAL ATATURK

88. An important precursor to Copernicus, this medieval priest and philosopher is better remembered today for his indecisive ass.

JEAN BURIDAN

89. This activist nun served for two years as chairperson of the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty.

SISTER HELEN PREJEAN

90. This Roman Catholic clergyman is the chief villain in what is BY FAR the most popular novel published in 1831.

CLAUDE FROLLO

91. He co-founded the company which produced the world’s first truly transistorized radio, and remained its chairman until suffering a stroke while playing tennis at the age of 72.

AKIO MORITA

92. He wrote the lyrics for my all-time favorite musical – look to the left and you’ll see me performing in it – but his biggest hit was the first Broadway musical to run more than 3000 performances.

SHELDON HARNICK

93. This German chemist’s theorem – which states that, as absolute zero is approached, the entropy change ΔS for a chemical or physical transformation approaches 0 – was an important step in establishing the Third Law of Thermodynamics.

WALTHER NERNST

94. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, this admiral was removed from command of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and busted from four to two stars.

HUSBAND KIMMEL

95. A classic 1908 novel by this Scottish author features what is almost certainly the most likable rat in all of children’s literature.

KENNETH GRAHAME

96. In 1986, he became the first Latin American filmmaker to receive an Oscar nomination for Best Director.

HECTOR BABENCO (Kiss of the Spider Woman)

97. Major Enlightenment figures who sat for this neoclassical sculptor included Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, and Ben Franklin.

98. This journalist – who will celebrate his 96th birthday next month – served at various times as a correspondent for CBS, NBC, and the New York Times, but his tenure as spokesman for the U.S. State Department ended when he resigned in protest over the Reagan administration’s disinformation campaign against Muammar Gaddafi.

Isn't this BERNARD KALB?

99. This philosopher’s most iconic statement – and, as we know, I do not use the word ‘iconic’ lightly – is found in a treatise the full title of which is A Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting One's Reason and of Seeking Truth in the Sciences.

RENE DESCARTES

100. This scientist and politician – no, they are not mutually exclusive – went from chairing the Atomic Energy Commission to governing a state.

DIXY LEE RAY

101. A member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, he played more than 16,000 games in a professional career that spanned five decades – and not one of those games was played in the NBA.

MEADOWLARK LEMON

102. DJMQ: This dancer and choreographer enjoyed a 60+ year career interpreting and teaching the works and techniques of Martha Graham – and a 40+ marriage to Dr. No.
PEARL LANG

103. He became nationally known as the father of Cara, Madelyn, Aaden, Collin, Joel, Alexis, Hannah, and Leah.

JON GOSSELIN

104. Speaking of grocery stores – as we were 75 questions ago – the grocery store that he opened in 1883 has since grown into America’s largest supermarket chain by revenue.

BERNARD KROGER

105. In 1977, he became the second and last Spanish poet to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

107. This American physicist and his older Italian collaborator received the Nobel Prize for their discovery of the antiproton.

108. In an epic 1983 movie, this actor played a real-life hero who really, really, really did not want the press to use his first name.

BEN KINGSLEY

109. Born into slavery in New York, this reformer delivered a memorable speech at an 1851 women’s rights convention in Akron, Ohio. (The answer to the rhetorical question posed in that speech was ‘Yes.’)

SOJOURNER TRUTH

110. After fifteen years of refusing, for legal reasons, to perform any of his old songs, this rocker finally relented at a concert in 1987 because, as he said, ‘Bob Dylan asked me.’

JOHN FOGERTY

111. Though a strong supporter of the Salem Witch Trials, this minister wrote to one of the judges warning him not to ‘lay more stress on pure spectral evidence than it will bear.’

COTTON MATHER

112. In 1952, this Australian tennis player won the first of her two Women’s Singles titles, the second of her four Mixed Doubles titles, and the tenth of her twelve Women’s Doubles titles at the Australian Open.


113. The last president of France’s Third Republic, he said that he never resigned his position after the Nazi takeover because – with the National Assembly disbanded – there was no one to tender his resignation to.

114. This military commander attained the peerage as a result, not of his most famous victory, but of his leadership in the earlier Peninsular War.

DUKE OF WELLINGTON

115. This American impressionist is best known for a series of paintings with the Stars and Stripes as their central motif.

JASPER JOHNS

116. She is the head designer for the luxury goods company founded by her grandfather in 1913.

MIUCCIA PRADA

117. This puritanical steward becomes the victim of a cruel hoax and eventually stalks off stage swearing, ‘I’ll be reveng’d on the whole pack of you.’ (Regrettably, his creator never got around to writing Part Two: The Revenge.)

MALVOLIO

118. This explorer got his name on two bodies of water thanks to the expeditions he undertook at the behest of Peter the Great.

VITUS BERING

119. Regarding his influential 1905 novel, this writer commented, ‘I aimed at the public's heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach.’

UPTON SINCLAIR

120. She is the Oscar-winning daughter of a Tony-winning and Emmy-winning mother – and yes, that is the exact obverse of a clue in my last movie game.

GWYNETH PALTROW

121. The name of this British biologist will forever be linked with that of the younger American with whom he made a very important discovery in 1953

FRANCIS CRICK

122. Talk about your power couples: he won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to money theory, while his wife won the Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts on behalf of disarmament.

123. Christy Mathewson, Walter Johnson, and Cy Young were the only pitchers to beat this one into the Hall of Fame.

GROVER CLEVELAND ALEXANDER

124. When this composer published his most popular work in 1725, each sonata was accompanied by a sonnet, one of which reads in part, ‘On the flower-strewn meadow, with leafy branches/Rustling overhead, the goat-herd sleeps/His faithful dog beside him.’

ANTONIO VIVALDI

125. He completes the following list: Theodore Roosevelt; Jimmy Carter; Barack Obama.

WOODROW WILSON


ASSOCIATED WORD LIST
Genesis
Five
24
40
Bohemia
Weimar
Wyoming
Hawaii
Wisconsin
Tennessee
Long Island
Houston
Philadelphia
DC
Dragon
Owl
Falcon
Duck
Buck
Bunny
Cub
Giant
Pirate
Hitman
Sniper
Counterfeiter
Amateur
Communist
Commissioner
Dean
Homer
Vince
Charles
Shelley
Joy
Boone
Brown
Nixon
Psychology
Biochemistry
Rolling
Flying
Hanging
Kiss
Touch
Stroke
Velvet
Gown
Shoes
Ice Cream
Milk Shake
Chips
Borscht
Wall
Balcony
Radio
Tool
Instrument
Follies
Cabaret
Psycho
King of Kings
Speed
Race
Cruel


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 9:58 pm 
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franktangredi wrote:


On #108, it's also fair to say that "epic" may have been a misleading word for the film, though I've seen it described as such. However, Gandhi came out in 1982 anyway. And the scene I'm referring to is a fairly memorable moment in the movie.


The movie could be The Right Stuff and the astronaut was Virgil "Gus" Grissom. So, that would make the answer to the question Fred Ward, yet another last name that could easily be used as a first name.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 10:04 pm 
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franktangredi wrote:

70. This Swiss playwright took Broadway by storm in 1958 with a savagely cynical tale of vengeance that also marked the last stage appearance of the Lunts.


Friedrich Durrenmatt (yet another first name that could be a last name).

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 10:10 pm 
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silverscreenselect wrote:
franktangredi wrote:


On #108, it's also fair to say that "epic" may have been a misleading word for the film, though I've seen it described as such. However, Gandhi came out in 1982 anyway. And the scene I'm referring to is a fairly memorable moment in the movie.


The movie could be The Right Stuff and the astronaut was Virgil "Gus" Grissom. So, that would make the answer to the question Fred Ward, yet another last name that could easily be used as a first name.
I was still in Wisconsin in 1983. I thought The Right Stuff came out later than that. --Bob

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 10:36 pm 
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Reporting for duty!

franktangredi wrote:
Game #174: Puzzle Jam

Identify the 125 people in the clues below. Match them into 65 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words.

8. DJMQ: In 2013, this Romanian-born prima ballerina – accompanied by her dancer husband – left the Royal Ballet to become a principal dancer with the English National Ballet.

ALINA COJOCARA


Quote:
102. DJMQ: This dancer and choreographer enjoyed a 60+ year career interpreting and teaching the works and techniques of Martha Graham – and a 40+ marriage to Dr. No.

PEARL LANG

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 10:55 pm 
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OK. Back from the dinner.

54. This publisher staunchly opposed slavery in his newspaper, the National Era, but his greatest contribution to abolitionism was serializing a certain novel by a certain Mrs. Stowe.

As Frank mentioned, we are not looking for Whittier. We are looking for DR. GAMALIEL BAILEY, JR.

53. He resigned his 14-year presidency of an Ivy League University – which he skillfully guided through the Vietnam years – in order to accept a post at the Court of St. James.

KINGMAN BREWSTER, JR.

49. There is some question as to whether she was really as wicked as her enemies and Robert Graves made her out to be, but there is no question that she was executed for allegedly conspiring against her own husband.

VALERIA MESSALINA


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 11:01 pm 
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mellytu74 wrote:
113. The last president of France’s Third Republic, he said that he never resigned his position after the Nazi takeover because – with the National Assembly disbanded – there was no one to tender his resignation to.


Albert Lebrun

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2018 8:11 am 
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Bob78164 wrote:
silverscreenselect wrote:
franktangredi wrote:


On #108, it's also fair to say that "epic" may have been a misleading word for the film, though I've seen it described as such. However, Gandhi came out in 1982 anyway. And the scene I'm referring to is a fairly memorable moment in the movie.


The movie could be The Right Stuff and the astronaut was Virgil "Gus" Grissom. So, that would make the answer to the question Fred Ward, yet another last name that could easily be used as a first name.
I was still in Wisconsin in 1983. I thought The Right Stuff came out later than that. --Bob


In Wisconsin, it probably did... :)

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2018 8:19 am 
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Picking off the Nobelists...

42. This Nobel laureate first won recognition for his comic novels set in his native Trinidad.

V.S. NAIPAUL

75. This environmental activist was the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

WANGARI MUTA MAATHAI

105. In 1977, he became the second and last Spanish poet to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

CAMILO JOSE CELA

107. This American physicist and his older Italian collaborator received the Nobel Prize for their discovery of the antiproton.

OWEN CHAMBERLAIN

And the tennis one...

112. In 1952, this Australian tennis player won the first of her two Women’s Singles titles, the second of her four Mixed Doubles titles, and the tenth of her twelve Women’s Doubles titles at the Australian Open.

THELMA COYNE LONG

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2018 8:23 am 
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I looked up the question marks. 79. archbishop of Constantinople at the turn of the 5th century turns out to be St. John Chrysostom. So we can erase the question marks from the others.

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