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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:11 pm 
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http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryla ... story.html

Not just football, they are after hockey, lacrosse and soccer.

I guess the practice of a group of elementary boys playing "Kill the man" (with the ball) on the edges of a high school football field during a high school football game are probably frowned on in Maryland as well.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:34 pm 
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One interesting thing (to me) about football is that I know X number of people with life-long injuries caused by the sport-trick knees, etc etc.

For the most part, those with such injuries don't regret playing football and regard it as positive in their lives.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:45 pm 
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Spock wrote:
One interesting thing (to me) about football is that I know X number of people with life-long injuries caused by the sport-trick knees, etc etc.

For the most part, those with such injuries don't regret playing football and regard it as positive in their lives.


While I wouldn't place 100% faith in a single study, the possible link between playing football and brain damage does bear further research and study, and studies like this are a heck of a lot more reliable than a handful of Spock's old drinking buddies with trick knees.

http://time.com/4948320/football-brain- ... ons-study/

At one time, it used to be "wimpy" to wear seat belts or to refuse to smoke.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:57 pm 
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Spock wrote:
One interesting thing (to me) about football is that I know X number of people with life-long injuries caused by the sport-trick knees, etc etc.

For the most part, those with such injuries don't regret playing football and regard it as positive in their lives.


You can have a legitimate debate about the positives and negatives of this measure. But calling someone a "wimp" for being concerned about brain injuries to children certainly creates an unfortunate impression.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 2:18 pm 
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franktangredi wrote:
Spock wrote:
One interesting thing (to me) about football is that I know X number of people with life-long injuries caused by the sport-trick knees, etc etc.

For the most part, those with such injuries don't regret playing football and regard it as positive in their lives.


You can have a legitimate debate about the positives and negatives of this measure. But calling someone a "wimp" for being concerned about brain injuries to children certainly creates an unfortunate impression.


I think the trend towards protecting our kids from EVERYTHING is a sign of "The Age of the Wimp." As we have talked about before-I was a wimp, plain and simple. However, I also played football in high school and played outside extensively.

For various reasons, I do not like the trend towards organized sports at younger and younger levels. However, I think a bigger problem in society than sports injury is the lack of activity among youths. Simply put, kids dont play outside all day long like they used to in unstructured play. The obesity trend among youths is well-documented.

I can virtue signal and say, "I won't let my kids play football/hockey/ etc, et because of the risk of injury." However, if I don't replace it with other, probably more boring, physical activities and I let them sit on their phones for those "football" hours, I might be hurting them worse over time.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 2:59 pm 
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Spock wrote:
franktangredi wrote:
Spock wrote:
One interesting thing (to me) about football is that I know X number of people with life-long injuries caused by the sport-trick knees, etc etc.

For the most part, those with such injuries don't regret playing football and regard it as positive in their lives.


You can have a legitimate debate about the positives and negatives of this measure. But calling someone a "wimp" for being concerned about brain injuries to children certainly creates an unfortunate impression.


I think the trend towards protecting our kids from EVERYTHING is a sign of "The Age of the Wimp." As we have talked about before-I was a wimp, plain and simple. However, I also played football in high school and played outside extensively.

For various reasons, I do not like the trend towards organized sports at younger and younger levels. However, I think a bigger problem in society than sports injury is the lack of activity among youths. Simply put, kids dont play outside all day long like they used to in unstructured play. The obesity trend among youths is well-documented.

I can virtue signal and say, "I won't let my kids play football/hockey/ etc, et because of the risk of injury." However, if I don't replace it with other, probably more boring, physical activities and I let them sit on their phones for those "football" hours, I might be hurting them worse over time.



Kids aren't playing outside less because of safety and helicopter parents... they're playing outside less because their lives are built around cellphones and the other advanced technology of today that didn't exist when we were kids. The only way to cure that and force more outside play is to take the technology away from the kids, but parents won't do that. The children's inactivity problem is one of society, not outside regulation and safety...

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 3:46 pm 
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Spock wrote:
One interesting thing (to me) about football is that I know X number of people with life-long injuries caused by the sport-trick knees, etc etc.

For the most part, those with such injuries don't regret playing football and regard it as positive in their lives.



Of those, of course, who retain the cognitive ability to remember their younger days


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 9:44 pm 
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Spock wrote:
I guess the practice of a group of elementary boys playing "Kill the man" (with the ball) on the edges of a high school football field during a high school football game are probably frowned on in Maryland as well.
Especially if they call it "Smear the Queer."

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 10:49 pm 
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Estonut wrote:
Spock wrote:
I guess the practice of a group of elementary boys playing "Kill the man" (with the ball) on the edges of a high school football field during a high school football game are probably frowned on in Maryland as well.
Especially if they call it "Smear the Queer."


We usually called it dodgeball.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:50 am 
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BackInTex wrote:
Estonut wrote:
Spock wrote:
I guess the practice of a group of elementary boys playing "Kill the man" (with the ball) on the edges of a high school football field during a high school football game are probably frowned on in Maryland as well.
Especially if they call it "Smear the Queer."
We usually called it dodgeball.
For us, dodgeball involved throwing the ball (or several balls). StQ involved tackling the possessor to try to remove the ball.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:11 am 
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Estonut wrote:
BackInTex wrote:
Estonut wrote:
Especially if they call it "Smear the Queer."
We usually called it dodgeball.
For us, dodgeball involved throwing the ball (or several balls). StQ involved tackling the possessor to try to remove the ball.


We played a game growing up that we called "Anything goes". Essentially it was ruby without the rules. We set a ball down in the middle of the field, backyard, wherever we were playing at the time. The first team to get the ball across their goal won. The only rule was you could not approach the ball to start play until the word "Go!".

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 10:50 am 
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One interesting thing (to me) on sports injuries is the prevalence of ACL/MCL type of injuries (especially on girls). A friend of mine and I have often talked about this. In our day (mid 80's) you just never heard of that stuff and now, even the smallest schools have kids hobbbling around with that injury. Year-round ball and more athleticism in basketball and so forth leads to those types of injuries.

The friend's daughter had an ACL/MCL type injury in high school a few years ago and, in his discussions with medical personnel, about 70% of those injuries are to girls. This is due to hip and leg structure and so forth. Evolution just didn't prepare the female body for those types of forces on the leg.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:48 am 
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Another leg of the "Age of the Wimp" stool is that we are terrified of the sun. As if our kids were not sedentary and inside enough-if they do go outside for 5 minutes, we insist on slathering them with SPF 500.

Everybody my age and older should be dropping from skin cancer anytime now, a childhood largely spent outdoors (sandlot baseball among other things) with very little sunscreen applied.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:52 am 
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Spock wrote:
Another leg of the "Age of the Wimp" stool is that we are terrified of the sun. As if our kids were not sedentary and inside enough-if they do go outside for 5 minutes, we insist on slathering them with SPF 500.

Everybody my age and older should be dropping from skin cancer anytime now, a childhood largely spent outdoors (sandlot baseball among other things) with very little sunscreen applied.



Wasn't it lovely to grow up in an age when we actually had ozone to protect us? And you think everything is more safety conscious these days....


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:03 pm 
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Spock wrote:
Another leg of the "Age of the Wimp" stool is that we are terrified of the sun. As if our kids were not sedentary and inside enough-if they do go outside for 5 minutes, we insist on slathering them with SPF 500.

Everybody my age and older should be dropping from skin cancer anytime now, a childhood largely spent outdoors (sandlot baseball among other things) with very little sunscreen applied.

My wife and her daughter get terrible blisters within half an hour from the sun.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:07 pm 
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Spock wrote:
Another leg of the "Age of the Wimp" stool is that we are terrified of the sun. As if our kids were not sedentary and inside enough-if they do go outside for 5 minutes, we insist on slathering them with SPF 500.

Everybody my age and older should be dropping from skin cancer anytime now, a childhood largely spent outdoors (sandlot baseball among other things) with very little sunscreen applied.


Well, we do slather our youngest with SPF 500 (well, more like 100), but that is just good parenting. She was born with benign skin cancer, and her grandmother did die less than 6 months ago from skin cancer that became brain tumors. Our older two are happy that they do not have their parents "blinding white" genes. <g>

This is an interesting topic. I have heard of studies that support that flag football should be played until junior high or high school, and statements from numerous pro players who declared that this is how they treated or plan to treat their sons. After three decades of playing soccer, I wonder what damage that I did to my brain. Of course, I hated heading the ball, so I routinely avoided doing it whenever possible. :)

At my older kids' high school, they had 4 members of the girl's varsity basketball team last year who tore ACLs. (I myself tore ACLs in each knee, including the first time in my right during 3rd grade.)

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:49 pm 
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Appa23 wrote:
Well, we do slather our youngest with SPF 500 (well, more like 100), but that is just good parenting.


I would hope that we learn about better health and safety practices over the years. When I was growing up, lead paint was common. I don't think it's "wimpy" to remove it. The idea of sanitizing an operating room before performing surgery was considered "wimpy" at one time; the more blood on a surgeon's smock, the more experienced he was.

When I was growing up, I had allergy and sinus problems, so I received radium treatments. They stuck a needle-like device with a bit of radium on the end up my nose (it looked like a Fourth of July sparkler), and left it there for a half hour or so to burn away the sinuses. Needless to say, you won't see anyone prescribing that treatment today, but I don't think that's particularly wimpy. Instead, I wonder from time to time if I'm going to develop brain cancer.

Many parents are overly cautious, but there's also good reason not to do a lot of things we routinely did when I was growing up.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 2:27 pm 
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silverscreenselect wrote:
Appa23 wrote:
Well, we do slather our youngest with SPF 500 (well, more like 100), but that is just good parenting.


I would hope that we learn about better health and safety practices over the years. When I was growing up, lead paint was common. I don't think it's "wimpy" to remove it. The idea of sanitizing an operating room before performing surgery was considered "wimpy" at one time; the more blood on a surgeon's smock, the more experienced he was.

When I was growing up, I had allergy and sinus problems, so I received radium treatments. They stuck a needle-like device with a bit of radium on the end up my nose (it looked like a Fourth of July sparkler), and left it there for a half hour or so to burn away the sinuses. Needless to say, you won't see anyone prescribing that treatment today, but I don't think that's particularly wimpy. Instead, I wonder from time to time if I'm going to develop brain cancer.

Many parents are overly cautious, but there's also good reason not to do a lot of things we routinely did when I was growing up.


OMG. This reminded me of my first "real" job, other than babysitting, that I had summer before college. I was an assistant to an ENT doc and one of my duties was to watch the kids when they got radium treatments. Make sure they dint move. Fun times...scarily, not.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 3:59 pm 
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silverscreenselect wrote:
Appa23 wrote:
Well, we do slather our youngest with SPF 500 (well, more like 100), but that is just good parenting.


I would hope that we learn about better health and safety practices over the years. When I was growing up, lead paint was common. I don't think it's "wimpy" to remove it. The idea of sanitizing an operating room before performing surgery was considered "wimpy" at one time; the more blood on a surgeon's smock, the more experienced he was.

When I was growing up, I had allergy and sinus problems, so I received radium treatments. They stuck a needle-like device with a bit of radium on the end up my nose (it looked like a Fourth of July sparkler), and left it there for a half hour or so to burn away the sinuses. Needless to say, you won't see anyone prescribing that treatment today, but I don't think that's particularly wimpy. Instead, I wonder from time to time if I'm going to develop brain cancer.

Many parents are overly cautious, but there's also good reason not to do a lot of things we routinely did when I was growing up.

That must have been a southern thing. I got terrible nose bleeds up until I was 16 or so. They treated me with silver nitrate to kill the blood vessels though.

(I'll bet you knew the Final J! question last night.)

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 4:29 pm 
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Bob Juch wrote:
silverscreenselect wrote:
Appa23 wrote:
Well, we do slather our youngest with SPF 500 (well, more like 100), but that is just good parenting.


I would hope that we learn about better health and safety practices over the years. When I was growing up, lead paint was common. I don't think it's "wimpy" to remove it. The idea of sanitizing an operating room before performing surgery was considered "wimpy" at one time; the more blood on a surgeon's smock, the more experienced he was.

When I was growing up, I had allergy and sinus problems, so I received radium treatments. They stuck a needle-like device with a bit of radium on the end up my nose (it looked like a Fourth of July sparkler), and left it there for a half hour or so to burn away the sinuses. Needless to say, you won't see anyone prescribing that treatment today, but I don't think that's particularly wimpy. Instead, I wonder from time to time if I'm going to develop brain cancer.

Many parents are overly cautious, but there's also good reason not to do a lot of things we routinely did when I was growing up.

That must have been a southern thing. I got terrible nose bleeds up until I was 16 or so. They treated me with silver nitrate to kill the blood vessels though.

(I'll bet you knew the Final J! question last night.)


No. I was in Everett, Washington.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 4:38 pm 
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Plus, yes they did use silver nitrate to cauterize, something completely diff.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 4:58 pm 
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Radium was for adenoids and such.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 5:00 pm 
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 5:06 pm 
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Beebs52 wrote:
Radium was for adenoids and such.



It also makes a good garnish.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 5:08 pm 
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TheGlowingPotato wrote:
Beebs52 wrote:
Radium was for adenoids and such.



It also makes a good garnish.


Especially when depressed.

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