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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:22 am 
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Game #185: Resistance Is Futile!

Identify the 105 people in the clues below. Match them into 35 groups of three according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each threesome with FOUR of the Associated Words.

No name will be used twice.

There are some possible alternate pairs, but if you can make an alternate threesome, I’ll be astounded. This may be tough, but you'll work it out.

1. He completes the following list: George Washington; Thomas Jefferson; James Madison; James Monroe; Andrew Jackson; Ulysses S. Grant; Grover Cleveland; Woodrow Wilson; [Franklin Roosevelt]; Dwight Eisenhower; Ronald Reagan; George W. Bush; Barack Obama.

2. In a 1999 poll, a group of prominent physicists named this 19th Scottish theorist the third most important scientist of the millennium, behind Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton. (The practical applications of his theories and equations are an inescapable part of our everyday lives.)

3. This musician was the best-selling American recording artist of the period 1939-1943, with more #1 hits than would later be amassed by either Elvis or the Beatles.

4. Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in its second year of existence, this pitcher set a record that has stood for more than 100 years – and, safe to say, will never be broken.

5. The dominant literary figure of the Restoration, this poet-playwright-essayist-critic-translator was England’s first official Poet Laureate.

6. On screen, he played a character previously played on stage by Charles Nelson Reilly; on stage, he played a character previously played on screen by Lon Chaney.

7. In my first game show appearance in 1991, I correctly surmised in Final Jeopardy that the largest Fortune 500 company named for a person was the company founded by this man. (I still lost.)

8. DJMQ: This influential dancer and choreographer has created several major works in response to the AIDS epidemic, including one work inspired by the death of his partner and another inspired by his own HIV diagnosis.
Another DJMQ appears at #68.

9. Published in 1918, this historian’s autobiography earned him a posthumous Pulitzer Prize and was later named by Modern Library as the #1 English-language nonfiction book of the 20th century.

10. He was living on his family’s Kentucky plantation when the President of the United States recruited him for a two-year mission that earned him a permanent place in every American History textbook.

11. The hero of more than 80 novels, he made his first appearance in 1933 solving a case involving Velvet Claws.

12. The most important work of this British idealist philosopher was an 1893 study about the gap between appearances and reality.

13. Since his beatboxing skills helped him win second place on a popular competition series, he has released three albums – with steadily diminishing success.

14. This politician – who served four years as his state’s lone Representative in the House followed by thirty years in the Senate – is best known for sponsoring a retirement plan.

15. While Victoria was still on the throne, this English writer helped lead the charge against Victorianism with a satirical utopian novel and a cynical, semi-autobiographical bildungsroman.

16. More than 30 years after delivering his standard sign-off on his popular TV series for the last time, this comedian said his final “good night” in 2008.

17. His seventeen seasons with the oldest team in the NHL earned him a spot in the Hockey Hall of Fame, but he stated that his biggest professional thrill was winning his first Stanley Cup as a head coach.

18. Along with his Canadian colleague, this physicist earned a Nobel Prize for "the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor.”

19. Fourth president of the Royal Academy, this English painter was notable for his portraits of such notable figures as Queen Charlotte, Alexander MacKenzie, Fanny Kemble, and the Duke of Wellington.

20. As proprietor of the Emporia Gazzette, this journalist became a leading figure of the Progressive movement and spokesman for Middle America.

21. True to the principles of the group he founded, he turned down an honorary doctorate from Yale and refused to allow his picture to appear on the cover of Time magazine – indeed, most Americans were unaware of his full name until his 1971 obituaries.

22. He was founder and first bishop of the first independent African American church.

23. One of the first English seamen to make his fortune in the Triangle Trade, he later helped build up the English navy and served as a vice admiral in the defeat of the Spanish Armada.

24. At the 2007 Kennedy Center Honors, Art Garfunkel referred to this troubled musical innovator as “rock’s gentlest revolutionary.” (Sadly, his two brothers were not there to join the tribute.)

25. Though she would have preferred to be remembered for her translation of Dante’s Divine Comedy, that work remains a footnote to her eleven mystery novels featuring one of fiction’s most beloved amateur sleuths.

26. In addition to his film career – which included Oscar nominations for writing and directing – he also hosted Saturday Night Live ten times, a record that was eventually broken by Steve Martin.

27. His independent candidacy for President almost – but not quite – helped unseat the man who had succeeded him as Vice President.

28. During his relatively brief NFL career, this running back twice led the league in rushing attempts and became the first Giant to rush for 1,000 yards in a season.

29. This American scientist became embroiled in several nasty disputes, claiming retroactive priority over discoveries and inventions made by – among others – Samuel F.B. Morse and William T.G. Morton.

30. Though already convicted in the court of public opinion, she was acquitted of murder on July 5, 2011. (Social media was not pleased.)

31. Speaking of social media, this Internet entrepreneur made a lot of friends through the site he co-founded in 2003 – and which, contrary to popular belief, still exists.

32. In the interval between Get Smart and The Golden Girls, he was the title character of the only winner of the Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series to have a title character. Got that?

33. This sociologist’s 1967 book Organizations in Action helped give rise to such fields of study as institutional theory and organizational equality.

34. Both Paul McCartney and Julian Lennon have supported claims that this man was “the fifth Beatle,” though Julian’s father disparaged his contributions. (Of course; he would.)

35. Often homeless and sometimes institutionalized, this American eccentric claimed to have authored the longest book ever written, and became the subject of a book and a subsequent film in which he was portrayed by Sir Ian Holm.

36. This playwright won the Pulitzer Prize for his incisive skewering of a middle class woman who valued her home above her husband.

37. He was the only director ever to receive an Oscar nomination for a German-language film.

38. This onetime fur trader is sometimes called the “Father of British Columbia,” serving as its first colonial governor from 1858 through 1864.

39. Six years after the Pistons bought out this player’s contract, they retired his number – the most recent number retired by that team.

40. A pioneer in the field of Google Hacking, this computer security expert also founded the non-profit group Hackers for Charity.

41. The Alabama state quarter honors this activist, a member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World and co-founder of the America Civil Liberties Union.

42. He founded the empirical form of philosophy known as Australian Realism, based on the principle that "whatever exists … is real, that is to say it is a spatial and temporal situation or occurrence that is on the same level of reality as anything else that exists."

43. A leading figure in the transition from Federal architecture to Greek Revival, he designed many New England homes and also authored the first American pattern books, such as 1830’s Practical House Carpenter.

44. Known primarily for his menswear, this designer – who was knighted in 2000 for his services to the British fashion industry – has described his aesthetic as "well-made, good quality, simple cut, interesting fabric, easy to wear."

45. The trajectory of his life took him from the slave trade to a later career as a clergyman, abolitionist, and author of arguably the most popular hymn in the English-speaking world.

46. This general is almost exclusively remembered for the disastrous 1863 cavalry assault that bears his name.

47. The title character of one of this novelist’s best known works is described as “a large, well-made, smooth-faced man of fifty, with something of a stylish cast perhaps, but every mark of capacity and kindness” … and also as “particularly small and particularly wicked-looking.”

48. Though he enjoyed a long career, especially on the British stage, he is best remembered today for a single film role which proved that – in the elegance department – he could give Fred Astaire a run for his money.

49. His four-year stint as bassist for a pioneering thrash metal band ended with his death in a road accident at the age of 24.

50. Of her 26 Grand Slam titles, a record 19 were in women’s doubles and mixed doubles at Wimbledon

51. The metric discovered by and named for this New Zealand mathematician provided an exact solution to the Einstein field equation of general relativity.

52. This justice authored the majority opinion in the landmark 1896 case that is now considered one of the worst decisions in Supreme Court history – and which was effectively overruled 58 years later.

53. The comic strip he created in 1918 is the second longest-running strip in U.S. history – and the first in which the characters aged in (relatively) real time.

54. This abolitionist became celebrated as “the Man with the Branded Hand” due to the punishment he received for trying to help seven runaway slaves to freedom.

55. This average American boy and his dog Ribsy were introduced in a 1950 children’s book that spawned a series of sequels featuring him and his friends.

56. The sixth of eleven children, he was ten when his father was assassinated and only 39 when he himself died in a skiing accident

57. This New Jersey businessman and public official was the last person to hold a post that had previously been held by the likes of Morgan Bulkeley, Ford Frick, and A. Bartlett Giamatti.

58. In 1579, this English clergyman broke from the Church of England to form an early Congregationalist church; though he himself soon return to the Anglican church, his influence remained, and the majority of the Separatists aboard the Mayflower were members of the sect that bore his name.

59. She wore many hats in her career – music arranger, vocal coach, nightclub performer, dancer – but is best remembered for the series of children’s books she wrote and for her one major film role as a character based on Diane Vreeland.

60. The seventeenth and last victim of this man’s 1966 killing spree died of kidney damage – 35 years later.

61. This Philadelphia halfback was the first NFL player for more than ten touchdowns in a season – especially impressive since, at that time, teams only played twelve games a year.

62. Born in Tangipahoa Parish, he published his first cookbook at the age of 51 and didn’t become a national television celebrity until he was nearly 60.

63. The four stages of the process she helped define are excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.

64. After 15 years as the Speaker of the State Assembly, he became the first African American mayor of a major California city.

65. Considered by Milton Friedman to be America’s greatest economist, he played a major role in developing the quantity theory of money, but his reputation did suffer major damage when he declared that the stock market had reached a “permanently high plateau” – in 1929.

66. He is the only living person to have commanded a mission that landed on the moon.

67. A Loyalist officer during the American Revolution, he gained notoriety for his role in the Cherry Valley Massacre.

68. DJMQ: One of the last living members of the “third generation” of American modern dance, he gained notoriety in 1957 with a study in non-movement that earned him a blank newspaper review and prompted Martha Graham to call him a “naughty boy.”

69. One of the earliest poets of the English Renaissance, he helped introduce the sonnet form in England, though none of his own poems were published during his short lifetime.

70. This master of the slow burn was originally offered the role of Fred Mertz, but had to decline because he was already playing foil to another popular comedienne. (He made up for it later.)

71. Talk about durability: this singer-songwriter had his breakthrough hit in 1970 – with a song inspired by the suicide of a childhood friend – and achieved his first #1 album 45 years later.

72. This Victorian illustrator and caricaturist helped create our images of what Fagin, Bill Sikes, and Mr. Bumble look like.

73. It was not Charles Darwin, but this British philosopher, who coined the four-word phrase most popularly associated with Darwinism –especially in its social applications.

74. This businessman began working for Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1963 … became president several years after its name change … continued as CEO after its 1999 mega-merger … and finally retired – very profitably – in 2005.

75. This two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize is the senior member of the Chicago Tribune’s editorial board, but many of us know him best from his long tenure on The McLaughlin Group.

76. In addition to building the first American steam locomotive and operating the first U.S. ferry service, this inventor also played a major role in establishing U.S. patent law.

77. This onetime state governor effectively killed his own presidential aspirations on January 19, 2004. (Yeah!)

78. This cowboy was quite impressed by what he saw on his visit to a major Missouri city – especially the indoor toilets and the nude dancing girls.

79. Over the course of 20 seasons, this coach led two different teams to a total of 11 NBA championships.

80. The most famous – and most parodied – line penned by this playwright was, "Years from now, when you speak of this – and you will – be kind."

81. This performer has won five Emmy awards for his contributions to three different shows – an unscripted comedy show, an eponymous talk show, and a game show.

82. Talk about durability: at the age of 85, this singer became the oldest artist to make an appearance on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as the oldest living artist to hit Number One on the album chart.

83. He became the most celebrated of the three radicals who founded the Black Guerrilla Family in 1970.

84. She hated life in Washington, D.C. She didn’t want her husband to be a Senator. She didn’t want her husband to be President. She did not attend his inauguration. She spent most of her years in the White House secluded upstairs, writing letters to her dead son. It took her nearly two years to finally make her first official public appearance as First Lady. (Oh, and her husband drank.)

85. In 1854, this British tobacconist introduced an eponymous brand of “English ovals” – and an empire was (eventually) born.

86. In the 1920s, he became one of the first evangelists to broadcast over the radio and founded an institution to combat what he saw as the dangerous secularization of American higher education.

87. In 1953, this political theorist published a book that played a large role in shaping the modern American conservative movement; toward the end of his life, he became a vocal critic of Republican militarism and U.S. involvement in the Gulf War.

88. He served as Deputy Secretary of State under one Democratic President and – after a hiatus of twelve years – Secretary of State under the next Democratic President.

89. This British physiologist won the Nobel Prize for his development of the procedure that led to the birth of Louise Brown.

90. He completes the following list of U.S. Open winners: Horace Rawlins; Joe Lloyd; George Sargent; Jim Barnes; Cyril Walker; Tony Jacklin.

91. This poet was the 17th successor to the poet in Clue #5, but he became a dirty word to some who blamed him for the death another poet.

92. After his biggest hit reached Number One in 1962, this R&B singer began sporting a top hat, cape, monocle, and cane.

93. A member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, this British actor is best known in the United States for his Tony-winning role in which he taught us all how to do the Lambeth Walk.

94. This crime lord once said, “I wanted to be rich. I wanted to be Donald Trump rich, and so help me God, I made it" – but, despite some claims, he probably didn’t make it by smuggling drugs in the coffins of dead American soldiers.

95. This American painter was notable for his portraits of such notable figures as John and Abigail Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Jay, John Jacob Astor, and even King George III – but he is best known for an unfinished portrait of somebody else.

96. He was the protagonist of a linked series of more than 20 semi-autobiographical short stories written by arguably – as I called him in my last general knowledge game – the most influential American novelist of the 20th century.

97. This onetime dressmaker was once dubbed “the most dangerous woman in America” for her role as a union recruiter and strike organizer.

98. Lauded as the “organizer of victory” by Winston Churchill, he later became the only professional military officer to win the Nobel Peace Prize.

99. In 1833, this English physiologist propounded the theory that the spinal cord is comprised by a chain of units that functions as an independent reflex arcs.

100. One of the chief proponents of the philosophical school of pragmatism, he also was a major figure in the development of progressive education.

101. Though Mark Twain mercilessly skewered this novelist’s style, D.H. Lawrence praised him for the beauty of his writing and for his role in shaping an American mythology.

102. This former U.S. Senator was the chief architect of a 1998 agreement that helped bring peace to one of the more trouble regions of the world.

103. Talk about durability: this two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for music published his last work only a few months before his death – at the age of 103.

104. Often referred to as “the black Babe Ruth,” he became the second player inducted into the Hall of Fame for his career in the Negro leagues.

105. As you may recall from my last movie game, this director was the very first recipient of the AFI Lifetime Achievement Award.

ASSOCIATED WORDS
#20
Shakespeare
Spenser
Hardy
Strouse
Berkeley
MacDonald
Duran
Dodd
West
Kramer
Chapman
Jefferson
Clinton
Trump
Margaret
Donna
Albert
Peggy
Jerry
Greg
Gilda
Floyd
Dennis
Ali
Bonnie
Clarence
Mark
Def
Tammy
Jesse
Fred
Tor
Mick
Mickey
Daisy
Daffy
Faith
Charity
Buck
Panther
Horse
Rooster
Hound
Sheep
Foxes
Whales
Fighters
Rascals
Murderers
Sniper
Rifleman
Spy
Devil
Standup
Jerk
Giant
Patriot
Mayor
Chief
Chaplain
Martyr
Astronomer
Naturalist
Trapper
Media Mogul
Godfather
Wife
VP
OK
HUD
North Carolina
South Carolina
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Las Vegas
Seattle
Detroit
San Antonio
St. Louis
Baltimore
Nuremberg
Manila
Flatbush
Chesapeake
Nile
Neverland
Oz
Mercury
Apollo
Capricorn
Empty
Metaphysical
Spiritual
Bewitched
Wicked
Lust
Sin
Virtue
Property
Cello
Piccolo
Makeover
Reconstruction
Gold Rush
Golf
Poker
Swing
Jump
Press
Blow
Chop
Jelly
Ice Cream
Upstairs
Laundry
Enterprise
Arcades
College
Funk
Fever
Anesthesia
Formula
Ion
Magnetism
Circuit
Ferry
Train
One Way
Patches
Rules
Wars
Front Page
Middle
Center
Lost
This Week
Last Summer
Farewell


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:25 am 
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Location: Philadelphia, PA
I will play when we get home from being on the road.

The Charles Nelson Reilly answer is Michael Crawford. Hello Dolly and Phantom.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 11:07 am 
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Just saw this right before heading to bed... but I have to stop and answer this one...... for my third grade teacher.


55. This average American boy and his dog Ribsy were introduced in a 1950 children’s book that spawned a series of sequels featuring him and his friends.

Henry Huggins

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Thursday comics! Squirrel pictures! The link to my CafePress store! All kinds of fun stuff!!!!

Visit my Evil Squirrel blog here: http://evilsquirrelsnest.com


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 11:10 am 
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Awesome! Let’s get going…

1. He completes the following list: George Washington; Thomas Jefferson; James Madison; James Monroe; Andrew Jackson; Ulysses S. Grant; Grover Cleveland; Woodrow Wilson; [Franklin Roosevelt]; Dwight Eisenhower; Ronald Reagan; George W. Bush; Barack Obama.
BILL CLINTON

2. In a 1999 poll, a group of prominent physicists named this 19th Scottish theorist the third most important scientist of the millennium, behind Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton. (The practical applications of his theories and equations are an inescapable part of our everyday lives.)
JAMES CLERK MAXWELL

7. In my first game show appearance in 1991, I correctly surmised in Final Jeopardy that the largest Fortune 500 company named for a person was the company founded by this man. (I still lost.)
HENRY FORD

10. He was living on his family’s Kentucky plantation when the President of the United States recruited him for a two-year mission that earned him a permanent place in every American History textbook.
WILLIAM CLARK

14. This politician – who served four years as his state’s lone Representative in the House followed by thirty years in the Senate – is best known for sponsoring a retirement plan.
WILLIAM ROTH

25. Though she would have preferred to be remembered for her translation of Dante’s Divine Comedy, that work remains a footnote to her eleven mystery novels featuring one of fiction’s most beloved amateur sleuths.
DOROTHY SAYERS

30. Though already convicted in the court of public opinion, she was acquitted of murder on July 5, 2011. (Social media was not pleased.)
CASEY ANTHONY

41. The Alabama state quarter honors this activist, a member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World and co-founder of the America Civil Liberties Union.
HELEN KELLER

46. This general is almost exclusively remembered for the disastrous 1863 cavalry assault that bears his name.
GEORGE PICKETT

52. This justice authored the majority opinion in the landmark 1896 case that is now considered one of the worst decisions in Supreme Court history – and which was effectively overruled 58 years later.
HENRY BILLINGS BROWN

56. The sixth of eleven children, he was ten when his father was assassinated and only 39 when he himself died in a skiing accident
MICHAEL KENNEDY

57. This New Jersey businessman and public official was the last person to hold a post that had previously been held by the likes of Morgan Bulkeley, Ford Frick, and A. Bartlett Giamatti.
LEONARD COLEMAN

77. This onetime state governor effectively killed his own presidential aspirations on January 19, 2004. (Yeah!)
HOWARD DEAN

79. Over the course of 20 seasons, this coach led two different teams to a total of 11 NBA championships.
PHIL JACKSON

82. Talk about durability: at the age of 85, this singer became the oldest artist to make an appearance on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as the oldest living artist to hit Number One on the album chart.
TONY BENNETT

89. This British physiologist won the Nobel Prize for his development of the procedure that led to the birth of Louise Brown.
ROBERT EDWARDS

98. Lauded as the “organizer of victory” by Winston Churchill, he later became the only professional military officer to win the Nobel Peace Prize.
GEORGE MARSHALL

102. This former U.S. Senator was the chief architect of a 1998 agreement that helped bring peace to one of the more trouble regions of the world.
GEORGE MITCHELL


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 12:51 pm 
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So, my vacation plans ended up getting cancelled. I now have time to do Frank's latest game.

3. This musician was the best-selling American recording artist of the period 1939-1943, with more #1 hits than would later be amassed by either Elvis or the Beatles.

BING CROSBY

26. In addition to his film career – which included Oscar nominations for writing and directing – he also hosted Saturday Night Live ten times, a record that was eventually broken by Steve Martin.

BUCK HENRY

49. His four-year stint as bassist for a pioneering thrash metal band ended with his death in a road accident at the age of 24.

CLIVE BURTON (of Metallica)

61. This Philadelphia halfback was the first NFL player for more than ten touchdowns in a season – especially impressive since, at that time, teams only played twelve games a year.

STEVE VAN BUREN

71. Talk about durability: this singer-songwriter had his breakthrough hit in 1970 – with a song inspired by the suicide of a childhood friend – and achieved his first #1 album 45 years later.

JAMES TAYLOR?

81. This performer has won five Emmy awards for his contributions to three different shows – an unscripted comedy show, an eponymous talk show, and a game show.

WAYNE BRADY (for Whose Line Is It Anyway?, The Wayne Brady Show, & Let's Make A Deal)

84. She hated life in Washington, D.C. She didn’t want her husband to be a Senator. She didn’t want her husband to be President. She did not attend his inauguration. She spent most of her years in the White House secluded upstairs, writing letters to her dead son. It took her nearly two years to finally make her first official public appearance as First Lady. (Oh, and her husband drank.)

MARY TODD LINCOLN?

92. After his biggest hit reached Number One in 1962, this R&B singer began sporting a top hat, cape, monocle, and cane.

GENE CHANDLER (for "Duke Of Earl")

104. Often referred to as “the black Babe Ruth,” he became the second player inducted into the Hall of Fame for his career in the Negro leagues.

JOSH GIBSON


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 1:56 pm 
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franktangredi wrote:
Game #185: Resistance Is Futile!

Identify the 105 people in the clues below. Match them into 35 groups of three according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each threesome with FOUR of the Associated Words.

No name will be used twice.

There are some possible alternate pairs, but if you can make an alternate threesome, I’ll be astounded. This may be tough, but you'll work it out.

1. He completes the following list: George Washington; Thomas Jefferson; James Madison; James Monroe; Andrew Jackson; Ulysses S. Grant; Grover Cleveland; Woodrow Wilson; [Franklin Roosevelt]; Dwight Eisenhower; Ronald Reagan; George W. Bush; Barack Obama.

BILL CLINTON

2. In a 1999 poll, a group of prominent physicists named this 19th Scottish theorist the third most important scientist of the millennium, behind Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton. (The practical applications of his theories and equations are an inescapable part of our everyday lives.)

JAMES CLERK MAXWELL? Don't know the poll, but he fits the clue.

3. This musician was the best-selling American recording artist of the period 1939-1943, with more #1 hits than would later be amassed by either Elvis or the Beatles.

One of the DORSEYS????

4. Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in its second year of existence, this pitcher set a record that has stood for more than 100 years – and, safe to say, will never be broken.

CY YOUNG

5. The dominant literary figure of the Restoration, this poet-playwright-essayist-critic-translator was England’s first official Poet Laureate.

6. On screen, he played a character previously played on stage by Charles Nelson Reilly; on stage, he played a character previously played on screen by Lon Chaney.

MICHAEL CRAWFORD?

7. In my first game show appearance in 1991, I correctly surmised in Final Jeopardy that the largest Fortune 500 company named for a person was the company founded by this man. (I still lost.)

8. DJMQ: This influential dancer and choreographer has created several major works in response to the AIDS epidemic, including one work inspired by the death of his partner and another inspired by his own HIV diagnosis.
Another DJMQ appears at #68.

MICHAEL BENNETT?

9. Published in 1918, this historian’s autobiography earned him a posthumous Pulitzer Prize and was later named by Modern Library as the #1 English-language nonfiction book of the 20th century.

10. He was living on his family’s Kentucky plantation when the President of the United States recruited him for a two-year mission that earned him a permanent place in every American History textbook.

Either LEWIS or CLARK

11. The hero of more than 80 novels, he made his first appearance in 1933 solving a case involving Velvet Claws.

PERRY MASON

12. The most important work of this British idealist philosopher was an 1893 study about the gap between appearances and reality.

13. Since his beatboxing skills helped him win second place on a popular competition series, he has released three albums – with steadily diminishing success.

14. This politician – who served four years as his state’s lone Representative in the House followed by thirty years in the Senate – is best known for sponsoring a retirement plan.

ROTH, probably. I think Kemp was from New York

15. While Victoria was still on the throne, this English writer helped lead the charge against Victorianism with a satirical utopian novel and a cynical, semi-autobiographical bildungsroman.

16. More than 30 years after delivering his standard sign-off on his popular TV series for the last time, this comedian said his final “good night” in 2008.

DICK MARTIN

17. His seventeen seasons with the oldest team in the NHL earned him a spot in the Hockey Hall of Fame, but he stated that his biggest professional thrill was winning his first Stanley Cup as a head coach.

18. Along with his Canadian colleague, this physicist earned a Nobel Prize for "the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor.”

19. Fourth president of the Royal Academy, this English painter was notable for his portraits of such notable figures as Queen Charlotte, Alexander MacKenzie, Fanny Kemble, and the Duke of Wellington.

20. As proprietor of the Emporia Gazzette, this journalist became a leading figure of the Progressive movement and spokesman for Middle America.

HORACE GREELEY??

21. True to the principles of the group he founded, he turned down an honorary doctorate from Yale and refused to allow his picture to appear on the cover of Time magazine – indeed, most Americans were unaware of his full name until his 1971 obituaries.

BILL W. or the other guy who founded AA

22. He was founder and first bishop of the first independent African American church.

23. One of the first English seamen to make his fortune in the Triangle Trade, he later helped build up the English navy and served as a vice admiral in the defeat of the Spanish Armada.

24. At the 2007 Kennedy Center Honors, Art Garfunkel referred to this troubled musical innovator as “rock’s gentlest revolutionary.” (Sadly, his two brothers were not there to join the tribute.)

BRIAN WILSON

25. Though she would have preferred to be remembered for her translation of Dante’s Divine Comedy, that work remains a footnote to her eleven mystery novels featuring one of fiction’s most beloved amateur sleuths.

26. In addition to his film career – which included Oscar nominations for writing and directing – he also hosted Saturday Night Live ten times, a record that was eventually broken by Steve Martin.

BUCK HENRY?

27. His independent candidacy for President almost – but not quite – helped unseat the man who had succeeded him as Vice President.

28. During his relatively brief NFL career, this running back twice led the league in rushing attempts and became the first Giant to rush for 1,000 yards in a season.

29. This American scientist became embroiled in several nasty disputes, claiming retroactive priority over discoveries and inventions made by – among others – Samuel F.B. Morse and William T.G. Morton.

30. Though already convicted in the court of public opinion, she was acquitted of murder on July 5, 2011. (Social media was not pleased.)

CASEY ANTHONY

31. Speaking of social media, this Internet entrepreneur made a lot of friends through the site he co-founded in 2003 – and which, contrary to popular belief, still exists.

MYSPACE GUY

32. In the interval between Get Smart and The Golden Girls, he was the title character of the only winner of the Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series to have a title character. Got that?

BOB NEWHART?

33. This sociologist’s 1967 book Organizations in Action helped give rise to such fields of study as institutional theory and organizational equality.

Had to read this recently for a class. JAMES THOMPSON

34. Both Paul McCartney and Julian Lennon have supported claims that this man was “the fifth Beatle,” though Julian’s father disparaged his contributions. (Of course; he would.)

35. Often homeless and sometimes institutionalized, this American eccentric claimed to have authored the longest book ever written, and became the subject of a book and a subsequent film in which he was portrayed by Sir Ian Holm.

36. This playwright won the Pulitzer Prize for his incisive skewering of a middle class woman who valued her home above her husband.

37. He was the only director ever to receive an Oscar nomination for a German-language film.

38. This onetime fur trader is sometimes called the “Father of British Columbia,” serving as its first colonial governor from 1858 through 1864.

ASTOR?

39. Six years after the Pistons bought out this player’s contract, they retired his number – the most recent number retired by that team.

40. A pioneer in the field of Google Hacking, this computer security expert also founded the non-profit group Hackers for Charity.

41. The Alabama state quarter honors this activist, a member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World and co-founder of the America Civil Liberties Union.

42. He founded the empirical form of philosophy known as Australian Realism, based on the principle that "whatever exists … is real, that is to say it is a spatial and temporal situation or occurrence that is on the same level of reality as anything else that exists."

43. A leading figure in the transition from Federal architecture to Greek Revival, he designed many New England homes and also authored the first American pattern books, such as 1830’s Practical House Carpenter.

44. Known primarily for his menswear, this designer – who was knighted in 2000 for his services to the British fashion industry – has described his aesthetic as "well-made, good quality, simple cut, interesting fabric, easy to wear."

45. The trajectory of his life took him from the slave trade to a later career as a clergyman, abolitionist, and author of arguably the most popular hymn in the English-speaking world.

JOHN NEWTON

46. This general is almost exclusively remembered for the disastrous 1863 cavalry assault that bears his name.

PICKETT?

47. The title character of one of this novelist’s best known works is described as “a large, well-made, smooth-faced man of fifty, with something of a stylish cast perhaps, but every mark of capacity and kindness” … and also as “particularly small and particularly wicked-looking.”

48. Though he enjoyed a long career, especially on the British stage, he is best remembered today for a single film role which proved that – in the elegance department – he could give Fred Astaire a run for his money.

49. His four-year stint as bassist for a pioneering thrash metal band ended with his death in a road accident at the age of 24.

50. Of her 26 Grand Slam titles, a record 19 were in women’s doubles and mixed doubles at Wimbledon

MARTINA NAVRATILOVA?

51. The metric discovered by and named for this New Zealand mathematician provided an exact solution to the Einstein field equation of general relativity.

KERR -- don't know the first name

52. This justice authored the majority opinion in the landmark 1896 case that is now considered one of the worst decisions in Supreme Court history – and which was effectively overruled 58 years later.

53. The comic strip he created in 1918 is the second longest-running strip in U.S. history – and the first in which the characters aged in (relatively) real time.

54. This abolitionist became celebrated as “the Man with the Branded Hand” due to the punishment he received for trying to help seven runaway slaves to freedom.

55. This average American boy and his dog Ribsy were introduced in a 1950 children’s book that spawned a series of sequels featuring him and his friends.

HENRY HUGGINS

56. The sixth of eleven children, he was ten when his father was assassinated and only 39 when he himself died in a skiing accident

57. This New Jersey businessman and public official was the last person to hold a post that had previously been held by the likes of Morgan Bulkeley, Ford Frick, and A. Bartlett Giamatti.

58. In 1579, this English clergyman broke from the Church of England to form an early Congregationalist church; though he himself soon return to the Anglican church, his influence remained, and the majority of the Separatists aboard the Mayflower were members of the sect that bore his name.

59. She wore many hats in her career – music arranger, vocal coach, nightclub performer, dancer – but is best remembered for the series of children’s books she wrote and for her one major film role as a character based on Diane Vreeland.

60. The seventeenth and last victim of this man’s 1966 killing spree died of kidney damage – 35 years later.

CHARLES WHITMAN?

61. This Philadelphia halfback was the first NFL player for more than ten touchdowns in a season – especially impressive since, at that time, teams only played twelve games a year.

62. Born in Tangipahoa Parish, he published his first cookbook at the age of 51 and didn’t become a national television celebrity until he was nearly 60.

JUSTIN WILSON? -- the Cajun chef -- coubting myself as to whether that's his name or not.

63. The four stages of the process she helped define are excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.

64. After 15 years as the Speaker of the State Assembly, he became the first African American mayor of a major California city.

65. Considered by Milton Friedman to be America’s greatest economist, he played a major role in developing the quantity theory of money, but his reputation did suffer major damage when he declared that the stock market had reached a “permanently high plateau” – in 1929.

66. He is the only living person to have commanded a mission that landed on the moon.

67. A Loyalist officer during the American Revolution, he gained notoriety for his role in the Cherry Valley Massacre.

68. DJMQ: One of the last living members of the “third generation” of American modern dance, he gained notoriety in 1957 with a study in non-movement that earned him a blank newspaper review and prompted Martha Graham to call him a “naughty boy.”

69. One of the earliest poets of the English Renaissance, he helped introduce the sonnet form in England, though none of his own poems were published during his short lifetime.

70. This master of the slow burn was originally offered the role of Fred Mertz, but had to decline because he was already playing foil to another popular comedienne. (He made up for it later.)

71. Talk about durability: this singer-songwriter had his breakthrough hit in 1970 – with a song inspired by the suicide of a childhood friend – and achieved his first #1 album 45 years later.

JAMES TAYLOR

72. This Victorian illustrator and caricaturist helped create our images of what Fagin, Bill Sikes, and Mr. Bumble look like.

73. It was not Charles Darwin, but this British philosopher, who coined the four-word phrase most popularly associated with Darwinism –especially in its social applications.

SPENCER? ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE? I get them all confused.

74. This businessman began working for Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1963 … became president several years after its name change … continued as CEO after its 1999 mega-merger … and finally retired – very profitably – in 2005.

75. This two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize is the senior member of the Chicago Tribune’s editorial board, but many of us know him best from his long tenure on The McLaughlin Group.

76. In addition to building the first American steam locomotive and operating the first U.S. ferry service, this inventor also played a major role in establishing U.S. patent law.

77. This onetime state governor effectively killed his own presidential aspirations on January 19, 2004. (Yeah!)

HOWARD DEAN

78. This cowboy was quite impressed by what he saw on his visit to a major Missouri city – especially the indoor toilets and the nude dancing girls.

WILL PARKER, assuming we can use fictional characters

79. Over the course of 20 seasons, this coach led two different teams to a total of 11 NBA championships.

80. The most famous – and most parodied – line penned by this playwright was, "Years from now, when you speak of this – and you will – be kind."

81. This performer has won five Emmy awards for his contributions to three different shows – an unscripted comedy show, an eponymous talk show, and a game show.

82. Talk about durability: at the age of 85, this singer became the oldest artist to make an appearance on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as the oldest living artist to hit Number One on the album chart.

TONY BENNETT

83. He became the most celebrated of the three radicals who founded the Black Guerrilla Family in 1970.

84. She hated life in Washington, D.C. She didn’t want her husband to be a Senator. She didn’t want her husband to be President. She did not attend his inauguration. She spent most of her years in the White House secluded upstairs, writing letters to her dead son. It took her nearly two years to finally make her first official public appearance as First Lady. (Oh, and her husband drank.)

I thought this was Mary Todd Lincoln for sure. But the "drank" clue makes me think not.

85. In 1854, this British tobacconist introduced an eponymous brand of “English ovals” – and an empire was (eventually) born.

86. In the 1920s, he became one of the first evangelists to broadcast over the radio and founded an institution to combat what he saw as the dangerous secularization of American higher education.

87. In 1953, this political theorist published a book that played a large role in shaping the modern American conservative movement; toward the end of his life, he became a vocal critic of Republican militarism and U.S. involvement in the Gulf War.

88. He served as Deputy Secretary of State under one Democratic President and – after a hiatus of twelve years – Secretary of State under the next Democratic President.

CYRUS VANCE?

89. This British physiologist won the Nobel Prize for his development of the procedure that led to the birth of Louise Brown.

90. He completes the following list of U.S. Open winners: Horace Rawlins; Joe Lloyd; George Sargent; Jim Barnes; Cyril Walker; Tony Jacklin.

JUSTIN ROSE, I think, if these are all Brits.

91. This poet was the 17th successor to the poet in Clue #5, but he became a dirty word to some who blamed him for the death another poet.

92. After his biggest hit reached Number One in 1962, this R&B singer began sporting a top hat, cape, monocle, and cane.

93. A member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, this British actor is best known in the United States for his Tony-winning role in which he taught us all how to do the Lambeth Walk.

94. This crime lord once said, “I wanted to be rich. I wanted to be Donald Trump rich, and so help me God, I made it" – but, despite some claims, he probably didn’t make it by smuggling drugs in the coffins of dead American soldiers.

95. This American painter was notable for his portraits of such notable figures as John and Abigail Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Jay, John Jacob Astor, and even King George III – but he is best known for an unfinished portrait of somebody else.

96. He was the protagonist of a linked series of more than 20 semi-autobiographical short stories written by arguably – as I called him in my last general knowledge game – the most influential American novelist of the 20th century.

97. This onetime dressmaker was once dubbed “the most dangerous woman in America” for her role as a union recruiter and strike organizer.

98. Lauded as the “organizer of victory” by Winston Churchill, he later became the only professional military officer to win the Nobel Peace Prize.

99. In 1833, this English physiologist propounded the theory that the spinal cord is comprised by a chain of units that functions as an independent reflex arcs.

100. One of the chief proponents of the philosophical school of pragmatism, he also was a major figure in the development of progressive education.

101. Though Mark Twain mercilessly skewered this novelist’s style, D.H. Lawrence praised him for the beauty of his writing and for his role in shaping an American mythology.

102. This former U.S. Senator was the chief architect of a 1998 agreement that helped bring peace to one of the more trouble regions of the world.

GEORGE MITCHELL

103. Talk about durability: this two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for music published his last work only a few months before his death – at the age of 103.

104. Often referred to as “the black Babe Ruth,” he became the second player inducted into the Hall of Fame for his career in the Negro leagues.

JOSH GIBSON?

105. As you may recall from my last movie game, this director was the very first recipient of the AFI Lifetime Achievement Award.

ASSOCIATED WORDS
#20
Shakespeare
Spenser
Hardy
Strouse
Berkeley
MacDonald
Duran
Dodd
West
Kramer
Chapman
Jefferson
Clinton
Trump
Margaret
Donna
Albert
Peggy
Jerry
Greg
Gilda
Floyd
Dennis
Ali
Bonnie
Clarence
Mark
Def
Tammy
Jesse
Fred
Tor
Mick
Mickey
Daisy
Daffy
Faith
Charity
Buck
Panther
Horse
Rooster
Hound
Sheep
Foxes
Whales
Fighters
Rascals
Murderers
Sniper
Rifleman
Spy
Devil
Standup
Jerk
Giant
Patriot
Mayor
Chief
Chaplain
Martyr
Astronomer
Naturalist
Trapper
Media Mogul
Godfather
Wife
VP
OK
HUD
North Carolina
South Carolina
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Las Vegas
Seattle
Detroit
San Antonio
St. Louis
Baltimore
Nuremberg
Manila
Flatbush
Chesapeake
Nile
Neverland
Oz
Mercury
Apollo
Capricorn
Empty
Metaphysical
Spiritual
Bewitched
Wicked
Lust
Sin
Virtue
Property
Cello
Piccolo
Makeover
Reconstruction
Gold Rush
Golf
Poker
Swing
Jump
Press
Blow
Chop
Jelly
Ice Cream
Upstairs
Laundry
Enterprise
Arcades
College
Funk
Fever
Anesthesia
Formula
Ion
Magnetism
Circuit
Ferry
Train
One Way
Patches
Rules
Wars
Front Page
Middle
Center
Lost
This Week
Last Summer
Farewell

_________________
The real question of government versus private enterprise is argued on too philosophical and abstract a basis. Theoretically, planning may be good. But nobody has ever figured out the cause of government stupidity—and until they do (and find the cure), all ideal plans will fall into quicksand. -- Richard Feynman, "What do you Care what other People Think?"


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 4:38 pm 
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1. He completes the following list: George Washington; Thomas Jefferson; James Madison; James Monroe; Andrew Jackson; Ulysses S. Grant; Grover Cleveland; Woodrow Wilson; [Franklin Roosevelt]; Dwight Eisenhower; Ronald Reagan; George W. Bush; Barack Obama.

Bill Clinton

4. Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in its second year of existence, this pitcher set a record that has stood for more than 100 years – and, safe to say, will never be broken.

Cy Young

6. On screen, he played a character previously played on stage by Charles Nelson Reilly; on stage, he played a character previously played on screen by Lon Chaney.

Michael Crawford

7. In my first game show appearance in 1991, I correctly surmised in Final Jeopardy that the largest Fortune 500 company named for a person was the company founded by this man. (I still lost.)

Henry Ford?

9. Published in 1918, this historian’s autobiography earned him a posthumous Pulitzer Prize and was later named by Modern Library as the #1 English-language nonfiction book of the 20th century.

Robert Graves?

10. He was living on his family’s Kentucky plantation when the President of the United States recruited him for a two-year mission that earned him a permanent place in every American History textbook.

William Clark

23. One of the first English seamen to make his fortune in the Triangle Trade, he later helped build up the English navy and served as a vice admiral in the defeat of the Spanish Armada.

Francis Drake

24. At the 2007 Kennedy Center Honors, Art Garfunkel referred to this troubled musical innovator as “rock’s gentlest revolutionary.” (Sadly, his two brothers were not there to join the tribute.)

Gregg Allman?

26. In addition to his film career – which included Oscar nominations for writing and directing – he also hosted Saturday Night Live ten times, a record that was eventually broken by Steve Martin.

Buck Henry

27. His independent candidacy for President almost – but not quite – helped unseat the man who had succeeded him as Vice President.

Henry Wallace

30. Though already convicted in the court of public opinion, she was acquitted of murder on July 5, 2011. (Social media was not pleased.)

Casey Anthony?

32. In the interval between Get Smart and The Golden Girls, he was the title character of the only winner of the Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series to have a title character. Got that?

Barney Miller

34. Both Paul McCartney and Julian Lennon have supported claims that this man was “the fifth Beatle,” though Julian’s father disparaged his contributions. (Of course; he would.)

Brian Epstein

37. He was the only director ever to receive an Oscar nomination for a German-language film.

Wolfgang Peterson

38. This onetime fur trader is sometimes called the “Father of British Columbia,” serving as its first colonial governor from 1858 through 1864.

John Jacob Astor

41. The Alabama state quarter honors this activist, a member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World and co-founder of the America Civil Liberties Union.

Helen Keller

45. The trajectory of his life took him from the slave trade to a later career as a clergyman, abolitionist, and author of arguably the most popular hymn in the English-speaking world.

Whoever wrote Amazing Grace

50. Of her 26 Grand Slam titles, a record 19 were in women’s doubles and mixed doubles at Wimbledon

Martina Navratilova

52. This justice authored the majority opinion in the landmark 1896 case that is now considered one of the worst decisions in Supreme Court history – and which was effectively overruled 58 years later.

Decision was Plessy v. Ferguson.

57. This New Jersey businessman and public official was the last person to hold a post that had previously been held by the likes of Morgan Bulkeley, Ford Frick, and A. Bartlett Giamatti.

Whoever the last President of the National Legue was

60. The seventeenth and last victim of this man’s 1966 killing spree died of kidney damage – 35 years later.

Charles Whitman?

61. This Philadelphia halfback was the first NFL player for more than ten touchdowns in a season – especially impressive since, at that time, teams only played twelve games a year.

Steve Van Buren

63. The four stages of the process she helped define are excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.

Virginia Johnson

64. After 15 years as the Speaker of the State Assembly, he became the first African American mayor of a major California city.

Tom Bradley?

69. One of the earliest poets of the English Renaissance, he helped introduce the sonnet form in England, though none of his own poems were published during his short lifetime.

Christopher Marlowe?

70. This master of the slow burn was originally offered the role of Fred Mertz, but had to decline because he was already playing foil to another popular comedienne. (He made up for it later.)

George Burns?

77. This onetime state governor effectively killed his own presidential aspirations on January 19, 2004. (Yeah!)

Rick Perry?

78. This cowboy was quite impressed by what he saw on his visit to a major Missouri city – especially the indoor toilets and the nude dancing girls.

Will Parker

81. This performer has won five Emmy awards for his contributions to three different shows – an unscripted comedy show, an eponymous talk show, and a game show.

Wayne Brady

82. Talk about durability: at the age of 85, this singer became the oldest artist to make an appearance on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as the oldest living artist to hit Number One on the album chart.

Tony Bennett

84. She hated life in Washington, D.C. She didn’t want her husband to be a Senator. She didn’t want her husband to be President. She did not attend his inauguration. She spent most of her years in the White House secluded upstairs, writing letters to her dead son. It took her nearly two years to finally make her first official public appearance as First Lady. (Oh, and her husband drank.)

Mrs. Franklin Pierce

88. He served as Deputy Secretary of State under one Democratic President and – after a hiatus of twelve years – Secretary of State under the next Democratic President.

Cordell Hull

92. After his biggest hit reached Number One in 1962, this R&B singer began sporting a top hat, cape, monocle, and cane.

Screamin Jay Hawkins

95. This American painter was notable for his portraits of such notable figures as John and Abigail Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Jay, John Jacob Astor, and even King George III – but he is best known for an unfinished portrait of somebody else.

Gilbert Stuart

101. Though Mark Twain mercilessly skewered this novelist’s style, D.H. Lawrence praised him for the beauty of his writing and for his role in shaping an American mythology.

James Fenimore Cooper?

103. Talk about durability: this two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for music published his last work only a few months before his death – at the age of 103.

Eubie Blake?

104. Often referred to as “the black Babe Ruth,” he became the second player inducted into the Hall of Fame for his career in the Negro leagues.

Josh Gibson

105. As you may recall from my last movie game, this director was the very first recipient of the AFI Lifetime Achievement Award.

John Ford?

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 4:47 pm 
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Adding on to what's already there.

3. This musician was the best-selling American recording artist of the period 1939-1943, with more #1 hits than would later be amassed by either Elvis or the Beatles.

I think this is GLENN MILLER. I think Crosby's string went later. Miller dies in the plane crash - hence the 1943 stop date.

6. On screen, he played a character previously played on stage by Charles Nelson Reilly; on stage, he played a character previously played on screen by Lon Chaney.

Definitely MICHAEL CRAWFORD - Cornelius Hackl and the Phantom.

9. Published in 1918, this historian’s autobiography earned him a posthumous Pulitzer Prize and was later named by Modern Library as the #1 English-language nonfiction book of the 20th century.

HENRY ADAMS

20. As proprietor of the Emporia Gazzette, this journalist became a leading figure of the Progressive movement and spokesman for Middle America.

WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE

22. He was founder and first bishop of the first independent African American church.

RICHARD ALLEN

24. At the 2007 Kennedy Center Honors, Art Garfunkel referred to this troubled musical innovator as “rock’s gentlest revolutionary.” (Sadly, his two brothers were not there to join the tribute.)

BRIAN WILSON

32. In the interval between Get Smart and The Golden Girls, he was the title character of the only winner of the Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series to have a title character. Got that?

HAL LINDEN (Barney Miller)

34. Both Paul McCartney and Julian Lennon have supported claims that this man was “the fifth Beatle,” though Julian’s father disparaged his contributions. (Of course; he would.)

GEORGE MARTIN??

36. This playwright won the Pulitzer Prize for his incisive skewering of a middle class woman who valued her home above her husband.

GEORGE KELLY (Craig's Wife)

37. He was the only director ever to receive an Oscar nomination for a German-language film.

WOLFGANG PETERSEN? for Das Boot

44. Known primarily for his menswear, this designer – who was knighted in 2000 for his services to the British fashion industry – has described his aesthetic as "well-made, good quality, simple cut, interesting fabric, easy to wear."

PAUL SMITH?

47. The title character of one of this novelist’s best known works is described as “a large, well-made, smooth-faced man of fifty, with something of a stylish cast perhaps, but every mark of capacity and kindness” … and also as “particularly small and particularly wicked-looking.”

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

48. Though he enjoyed a long career, especially on the British stage, he is best remembered today for a single film role which proved that – in the elegance department – he could give Fred Astaire a run for his money.

JACK BUCHANAN

53. The comic strip he created in 1918 is the second longest-running strip in U.S. history – and the first in which the characters aged in (relatively) real time.

FRANK KING (Gasoline Alley)

56. The sixth of eleven children, he was ten when his father was assassinated and only 39 when he himself died in a skiing accident

This is one of Bobby Kennedy's kid but I don't know which one

57. This New Jersey businessman and public official was the last person to hold a post that had previously been held by the likes of Morgan Bulkeley, Ford Frick, and A. Bartlett Giamatti.

LEONARD COLEMAN (president of the NL)

59. She wore many hats in her career – music arranger, vocal coach, nightclub performer, dancer – but is best remembered for the series of children’s books she wrote and for her one major film role as a character based on Diane Vreeland.

KAY THOMPSON

61. This Philadelphia halfback was the first NFL player for more than ten touchdowns in a season – especially impressive since, at that time, teams only played twelve games a year.

STEVE VAN BUREN

64. After 15 years as the Speaker of the State Assembly, he became the first African American mayor of a major California city.

WILLIE BROWN? TOM BRADLEY?

70. This master of the slow burn was originally offered the role of Fred Mertz, but had to decline because he was already playing foil to another popular comedienne. (He made up for it later.)

GALE GORDON

78. This cowboy was quite impressed by what he saw on his visit to a major Missouri city – especially the indoor toilets and the nude dancing girls.

WILL PARKER (from Oklahoma)

80. The most famous – and most parodied – line penned by this playwright was, "Years from now, when you speak of this – and you will – be kind."

ROBERT ANDERSON

84. She hated life in Washington, D.C. She didn’t want her husband to be a Senator. She didn’t want her husband to be President. She did not attend his inauguration. She spent most of her years in the White House secluded upstairs, writing letters to her dead son. It took her nearly two years to finally make her first official public appearance as First Lady. (Oh, and her husband drank.)

JANE PIERCE

92. After his biggest hit reached Number One in 1962, this R&B singer began sporting a top hat, cape, monocle, and cane.

GENE CHANDLER

97. This onetime dressmaker was once dubbed “the most dangerous woman in America” for her role as a union recruiter and strike organizer.

MARY HARRIS JONES (Mother Jones)

105. As you may recall from my last movie game, this director was the very first recipient of the AFI Lifetime Achievement Award.

JOHN FORD


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 7:54 pm 
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68 -- The unmoving dancer/choreographer was PAUL TAYLOR. (The pianist "played" silence composed by John Cage.)

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 9:40 pm 
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First consolidation...

Identify the 105 people in the clues below. Match them into 35 groups of three according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each threesome with FOUR of the Associated Words.

No name will be used twice.

There are some possible alternate pairs, but if you can make an alternate threesome, I’ll be astounded. This may be tough, but you'll work it out.

1. He completes the following list: George Washington; Thomas Jefferson; James Madison; James Monroe; Andrew Jackson; Ulysses S. Grant; Grover Cleveland; Woodrow Wilson; [Franklin Roosevelt]; Dwight Eisenhower; Ronald Reagan; George W. Bush; Barack Obama.
BILL CLINTON

2. In a 1999 poll, a group of prominent physicists named this 19th Scottish theorist the third most important scientist of the millennium, behind Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton. (The practical applications of his theories and equations are an inescapable part of our everyday lives.)
JAMES CLERK MAXWELL

3. This musician was the best-selling American recording artist of the period 1939-1943, with more #1 hits than would later be amassed by either Elvis or the Beatles.
GLENN MILLER

4. Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in its second year of existence, this pitcher set a record that has stood for more than 100 years – and, safe to say, will never be broken.
CY YOUNG

5. The dominant literary figure of the Restoration, this poet-playwright-essayist-critic-translator was England’s first official Poet Laureate.

6. On screen, he played a character previously played on stage by Charles Nelson Reilly; on stage, he played a character previously played on screen by Lon Chaney.
MICHAEL CRAWFORD

7. In my first game show appearance in 1991, I correctly surmised in Final Jeopardy that the largest Fortune 500 company named for a person was the company founded by this man. (I still lost.)
HENRY FORD

8. DJMQ: This influential dancer and choreographer has created several major works in response to the AIDS epidemic, including one work inspired by the death of his partner and another inspired by his own HIV diagnosis.
Another DJMQ appears at #68.
MICHAEL BENNETT?

9. Published in 1918, this historian’s autobiography earned him a posthumous Pulitzer Prize and was later named by Modern Library as the #1 English-language nonfiction book of the 20th century.
HENRY ADAMS

10. He was living on his family’s Kentucky plantation when the President of the United States recruited him for a two-year mission that earned him a permanent place in every American History textbook.
WILLIAM CLARK

11. The hero of more than 80 novels, he made his first appearance in 1933 solving a case involving Velvet Claws.
PERRY MASON

12. The most important work of this British idealist philosopher was an 1893 study about the gap between appearances and reality.

13. Since his beatboxing skills helped him win second place on a popular competition series, he has released three albums – with steadily diminishing success.

14. This politician – who served four years as his state’s lone Representative in the House followed by thirty years in the Senate – is best known for sponsoring a retirement plan.
WILLIAM ROTH

15. While Victoria was still on the throne, this English writer helped lead the charge against Victorianism with a satirical utopian novel and a cynical, semi-autobiographical bildungsroman.

16. More than 30 years after delivering his standard sign-off on his popular TV series for the last time, this comedian said his final “good night” in 2008.
DICK MARTIN

17. His seventeen seasons with the oldest team in the NHL earned him a spot in the Hockey Hall of Fame, but he stated that his biggest professional thrill was winning his first Stanley Cup as a head coach.

18. Along with his Canadian colleague, this physicist earned a Nobel Prize for "the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor.”

19. Fourth president of the Royal Academy, this English painter was notable for his portraits of such notable figures as Queen Charlotte, Alexander MacKenzie, Fanny Kemble, and the Duke of Wellington.

20. As proprietor of the Emporia Gazzette, this journalist became a leading figure of the Progressive movement and spokesman for Middle America.
WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE

21. True to the principles of the group he founded, he turned down an honorary doctorate from Yale and refused to allow his picture to appear on the cover of Time magazine – indeed, most Americans were unaware of his full name until his 1971 obituaries.
BILL W.

22. He was founder and first bishop of the first independent African American church.
RICHARD ALLEN

23. One of the first English seamen to make his fortune in the Triangle Trade, he later helped build up the English navy and served as a vice admiral in the defeat of the Spanish Armada.
FRANCIS DRAKE

24. At the 2007 Kennedy Center Honors, Art Garfunkel referred to this troubled musical innovator as “rock’s gentlest revolutionary.” (Sadly, his two brothers were not there to join the tribute.)
BRIAN WILSON

25. Though she would have preferred to be remembered for her translation of Dante’s Divine Comedy, that work remains a footnote to her eleven mystery novels featuring one of fiction’s most beloved amateur sleuths.
DOROTHY SAYERS

26. In addition to his film career – which included Oscar nominations for writing and directing – he also hosted Saturday Night Live ten times, a record that was eventually broken by Steve Martin.
BUCK HENRY

27. His independent candidacy for President almost – but not quite – helped unseat the man who had succeeded him as Vice President.
HENRY WALLACE

28. During his relatively brief NFL career, this running back twice led the league in rushing attempts and became the first Giant to rush for 1,000 yards in a season.

29. This American scientist became embroiled in several nasty disputes, claiming retroactive priority over discoveries and inventions made by – among others – Samuel F.B. Morse and William T.G. Morton.

30. Though already convicted in the court of public opinion, she was acquitted of murder on July 5, 2011. (Social media was not pleased.)
CASEY ANTHONY

31. Speaking of social media, this Internet entrepreneur made a lot of friends through the site he co-founded in 2003 – and which, contrary to popular belief, still exists.

32. In the interval between Get Smart and The Golden Girls, he was the title character of the only winner of the Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series to have a title character. Got that?
BARNEY MILLER

33. This sociologist’s 1967 book Organizations in Action helped give rise to such fields of study as institutional theory and organizational equality.
JAMES THOMPSON

34. Both Paul McCartney and Julian Lennon have supported claims that this man was “the fifth Beatle,” though Julian’s father disparaged his contributions. (Of course; he would.)
BRIAN EPSTEIN? GEORGE MARTIN?

35. Often homeless and sometimes institutionalized, this American eccentric claimed to have authored the longest book ever written, and became the subject of a book and a subsequent film in which he was portrayed by Sir Ian Holm.

36. This playwright won the Pulitzer Prize for his incisive skewering of a middle class woman who valued her home above her husband.
GEORGE KELLY

37. He was the only director ever to receive an Oscar nomination for a German-language film.
WOLFGANG PETERSEN

38. This onetime fur trader is sometimes called the “Father of British Columbia,” serving as its first colonial governor from 1858 through 1864.
JOHN JACOB ASTOR

39. Six years after the Pistons bought out this player’s contract, they retired his number – the most recent number retired by that team.

40. A pioneer in the field of Google Hacking, this computer security expert also founded the non-profit group Hackers for Charity.

41. The Alabama state quarter honors this activist, a member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World and co-founder of the America Civil Liberties Union.
HELEN KELLER

42. He founded the empirical form of philosophy known as Australian Realism, based on the principle that "whatever exists … is real, that is to say it is a spatial and temporal situation or occurrence that is on the same level of reality as anything else that exists."

43. A leading figure in the transition from Federal architecture to Greek Revival, he designed many New England homes and also authored the first American pattern books, such as 1830’s Practical House Carpenter.

44. Known primarily for his menswear, this designer – who was knighted in 2000 for his services to the British fashion industry – has described his aesthetic as "well-made, good quality, simple cut, interesting fabric, easy to wear."
PAUL SMITH?

45. The trajectory of his life took him from the slave trade to a later career as a clergyman, abolitionist, and author of arguably the most popular hymn in the English-speaking world.
JOHN NEWTON

46. This general is almost exclusively remembered for the disastrous 1863 cavalry assault that bears his name.
GEORGE PICKETT

47. The title character of one of this novelist’s best known works is described as “a large, well-made, smooth-faced man of fifty, with something of a stylish cast perhaps, but every mark of capacity and kindness” … and also as “particularly small and particularly wicked-looking.”
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

48. Though he enjoyed a long career, especially on the British stage, he is best remembered today for a single film role which proved that – in the elegance department – he could give Fred Astaire a run for his money.
JACK BUCHANAN

49. His four-year stint as bassist for a pioneering thrash metal band ended with his death in a road accident at the age of 24.
CLIVE BURTON

50. Of her 26 Grand Slam titles, a record 19 were in women’s doubles and mixed doubles at Wimbledon
MARTINA NAVRATILOVA

51. The metric discovered by and named for this New Zealand mathematician provided an exact solution to the Einstein field equation of general relativity.
KERR

52. This justice authored the majority opinion in the landmark 1896 case that is now considered one of the worst decisions in Supreme Court history – and which was effectively overruled 58 years later.
HENRY BILLINGS BROWN

53. The comic strip he created in 1918 is the second longest-running strip in U.S. history – and the first in which the characters aged in (relatively) real time.
FRANK KING

54. This abolitionist became celebrated as “the Man with the Branded Hand” due to the punishment he received for trying to help seven runaway slaves to freedom.

55. This average American boy and his dog Ribsy were introduced in a 1950 children’s book that spawned a series of sequels featuring him and his friends.
HENRY HUGGINS

56. The sixth of eleven children, he was ten when his father was assassinated and only 39 when he himself died in a skiing accident
MICHAEL KENNEDY

57. This New Jersey businessman and public official was the last person to hold a post that had previously been held by the likes of Morgan Bulkeley, Ford Frick, and A. Bartlett Giamatti.
LEONARD COLEMAN

58. In 1579, this English clergyman broke from the Church of England to form an early Congregationalist church; though he himself soon return to the Anglican church, his influence remained, and the majority of the Separatists aboard the Mayflower were members of the sect that bore his name.

59. She wore many hats in her career – music arranger, vocal coach, nightclub performer, dancer – but is best remembered for the series of children’s books she wrote and for her one major film role as a character based on Diane Vreeland.
KAY THOMPSON

60. The seventeenth and last victim of this man’s 1966 killing spree died of kidney damage – 35 years later.
CHARLES WHITMAN?

61. This Philadelphia halfback was the first NFL player for more than ten touchdowns in a season – especially impressive since, at that time, teams only played twelve games a year.
STEVE VAN BUREN

62. Born in Tangipahoa Parish, he published his first cookbook at the age of 51 and didn’t become a national television celebrity until he was nearly 60.
JUSTIN WILSON?

63. The four stages of the process she helped define are excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.
VIRGINIA JOHNSON

64. After 15 years as the Speaker of the State Assembly, he became the first African American mayor of a major California city.
TOM BRADLEY? WILLIE BROWN?

65. Considered by Milton Friedman to be America’s greatest economist, he played a major role in developing the quantity theory of money, but his reputation did suffer major damage when he declared that the stock market had reached a “permanently high plateau” – in 1929.

66. He is the only living person to have commanded a mission that landed on the moon.

67. A Loyalist officer during the American Revolution, he gained notoriety for his role in the Cherry Valley Massacre.

68. DJMQ: One of the last living members of the “third generation” of American modern dance, he gained notoriety in 1957 with a study in non-movement that earned him a blank newspaper review and prompted Martha Graham to call him a “naughty boy.”
PAUL TAYLOR

69. One of the earliest poets of the English Renaissance, he helped introduce the sonnet form in England, though none of his own poems were published during his short lifetime.
CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE?

70. This master of the slow burn was originally offered the role of Fred Mertz, but had to decline because he was already playing foil to another popular comedienne. (He made up for it later.)
GEORGE BURNS? GALE GORDON?

71. Talk about durability: this singer-songwriter had his breakthrough hit in 1970 – with a song inspired by the suicide of a childhood friend – and achieved his first #1 album 45 years later.
JAMES TAYLOR

72. This Victorian illustrator and caricaturist helped create our images of what Fagin, Bill Sikes, and Mr. Bumble look like.

73. It was not Charles Darwin, but this British philosopher, who coined the four-word phrase most popularly associated with Darwinism –especially in its social applications.
SPENCER? ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE?

74. This businessman began working for Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1963 … became president several years after its name change … continued as CEO after its 1999 mega-merger … and finally retired – very profitably – in 2005.

75. This two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize is the senior member of the Chicago Tribune’s editorial board, but many of us know him best from his long tenure on The McLaughlin Group.

76. In addition to building the first American steam locomotive and operating the first U.S. ferry service, this inventor also played a major role in establishing U.S. patent law.

77. This onetime state governor effectively killed his own presidential aspirations on January 19, 2004. (Yeah!)
HOWARD DEAN

78. This cowboy was quite impressed by what he saw on his visit to a major Missouri city – especially the indoor toilets and the nude dancing girls.
WILL PARKER

79. Over the course of 20 seasons, this coach led two different teams to a total of 11 NBA championships.
PHIL JACKSON

80. The most famous – and most parodied – line penned by this playwright was, "Years from now, when you speak of this – and you will – be kind."
ROBERT ANDERSON

81. This performer has won five Emmy awards for his contributions to three different shows – an unscripted comedy show, an eponymous talk show, and a game show.
WAYNE BRADY

82. Talk about durability: at the age of 85, this singer became the oldest artist to make an appearance on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as the oldest living artist to hit Number One on the album chart.
TONY BENNETT

83. He became the most celebrated of the three radicals who founded the Black Guerrilla Family in 1970.

84. She hated life in Washington, D.C. She didn’t want her husband to be a Senator. She didn’t want her husband to be President. She did not attend his inauguration. She spent most of her years in the White House secluded upstairs, writing letters to her dead son. It took her nearly two years to finally make her first official public appearance as First Lady. (Oh, and her husband drank.)
JANE PIERCE

85. In 1854, this British tobacconist introduced an eponymous brand of “English ovals” – and an empire was (eventually) born.

86. In the 1920s, he became one of the first evangelists to broadcast over the radio and founded an institution to combat what he saw as the dangerous secularization of American higher education.

87. In 1953, this political theorist published a book that played a large role in shaping the modern American conservative movement; toward the end of his life, he became a vocal critic of Republican militarism and U.S. involvement in the Gulf War.

88. He served as Deputy Secretary of State under one Democratic President and – after a hiatus of twelve years – Secretary of State under the next Democratic President.
CORDELL HULL

89. This British physiologist won the Nobel Prize for his development of the procedure that led to the birth of Louise Brown.
ROBERT EDWARDS

90. He completes the following list of U.S. Open winners: Horace Rawlins; Joe Lloyd; George Sargent; Jim Barnes; Cyril Walker; Tony Jacklin.
JUSTIN ROSE

91. This poet was the 17th successor to the poet in Clue #5, but he became a dirty word to some who blamed him for the death another poet.

92. After his biggest hit reached Number One in 1962, this R&B singer began sporting a top hat, cape, monocle, and cane.
GENE CHANDLER

93. A member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, this British actor is best known in the United States for his Tony-winning role in which he taught us all how to do the Lambeth Walk.

94. This crime lord once said, “I wanted to be rich. I wanted to be Donald Trump rich, and so help me God, I made it" – but, despite some claims, he probably didn’t make it by smuggling drugs in the coffins of dead American soldiers.

95. This American painter was notable for his portraits of such notable figures as John and Abigail Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Jay, John Jacob Astor, and even King George III – but he is best known for an unfinished portrait of somebody else.
GILBERT STUART

96. He was the protagonist of a linked series of more than 20 semi-autobiographical short stories written by arguably – as I called him in my last general knowledge game – the most influential American novelist of the 20th century.

97. This onetime dressmaker was once dubbed “the most dangerous woman in America” for her role as a union recruiter and strike organizer.
MARY HARRIS JONES

98. Lauded as the “organizer of victory” by Winston Churchill, he later became the only professional military officer to win the Nobel Peace Prize.
GEORGE MARSHALL

99. In 1833, this English physiologist propounded the theory that the spinal cord is comprised by a chain of units that functions as an independent reflex arcs.

100. One of the chief proponents of the philosophical school of pragmatism, he also was a major figure in the development of progressive education.

101. Though Mark Twain mercilessly skewered this novelist’s style, D.H. Lawrence praised him for the beauty of his writing and for his role in shaping an American mythology.
JAMES FENIMORE COOPER?

102. This former U.S. Senator was the chief architect of a 1998 agreement that helped bring peace to one of the more trouble regions of the world.
GEORGE MITCHELL

103. Talk about durability: this two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for music published his last work only a few months before his death – at the age of 103.
EUBIE BLAKE?

104. Often referred to as “the black Babe Ruth,” he became the second player inducted into the Hall of Fame for his career in the Negro leagues.
JOSH GIBSON

105. As you may recall from my last movie game, this director was the very first recipient of the AFI Lifetime Achievement Award.
JOHN FORD

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 9:48 pm 
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Location: Merion, Pa.
Lots of repeated surnames (MILLER, FORD, BENNETT, MARTIN, WILSON, WALLACE, THOMPSON, BROWN, TAYLOR). Repeated first names too, but that’s not as unusual.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:05 pm 
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There are four wrong 'definite' answers here, plus two that are right but incomplete.

Of the answers with a single question mark, three are right and three are wrong.

All of the ones with alternate answers include the right answer.


jarnon wrote:
First consolidation...

Identify the 105 people in the clues below. Match them into 35 groups of three according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each threesome with FOUR of the Associated Words.

No name will be used twice.

There are some possible alternate pairs, but if you can make an alternate threesome, I’ll be astounded. This may be tough, but you'll work it out.

1. He completes the following list: George Washington; Thomas Jefferson; James Madison; James Monroe; Andrew Jackson; Ulysses S. Grant; Grover Cleveland; Woodrow Wilson; [Franklin Roosevelt]; Dwight Eisenhower; Ronald Reagan; George W. Bush; Barack Obama.
BILL CLINTON

2. In a 1999 poll, a group of prominent physicists named this 19th Scottish theorist the third most important scientist of the millennium, behind Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton. (The practical applications of his theories and equations are an inescapable part of our everyday lives.)
JAMES CLERK MAXWELL

3. This musician was the best-selling American recording artist of the period 1939-1943, with more #1 hits than would later be amassed by either Elvis or the Beatles.
GLENN MILLER

4. Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in its second year of existence, this pitcher set a record that has stood for more than 100 years – and, safe to say, will never be broken.
CY YOUNG

5. The dominant literary figure of the Restoration, this poet-playwright-essayist-critic-translator was England’s first official Poet Laureate.

6. On screen, he played a character previously played on stage by Charles Nelson Reilly; on stage, he played a character previously played on screen by Lon Chaney.
MICHAEL CRAWFORD

7. In my first game show appearance in 1991, I correctly surmised in Final Jeopardy that the largest Fortune 500 company named for a person was the company founded by this man. (I still lost.)
HENRY FORD

8. DJMQ: This influential dancer and choreographer has created several major works in response to the AIDS epidemic, including one work inspired by the death of his partner and another inspired by his own HIV diagnosis.
Another DJMQ appears at #68.
MICHAEL BENNETT?

9. Published in 1918, this historian’s autobiography earned him a posthumous Pulitzer Prize and was later named by Modern Library as the #1 English-language nonfiction book of the 20th century.
HENRY ADAMS

10. He was living on his family’s Kentucky plantation when the President of the United States recruited him for a two-year mission that earned him a permanent place in every American History textbook.
WILLIAM CLARK

11. The hero of more than 80 novels, he made his first appearance in 1933 solving a case involving Velvet Claws.
PERRY MASON

12. The most important work of this British idealist philosopher was an 1893 study about the gap between appearances and reality.

13. Since his beatboxing skills helped him win second place on a popular competition series, he has released three albums – with steadily diminishing success.

14. This politician – who served four years as his state’s lone Representative in the House followed by thirty years in the Senate – is best known for sponsoring a retirement plan.
WILLIAM ROTH

15. While Victoria was still on the throne, this English writer helped lead the charge against Victorianism with a satirical utopian novel and a cynical, semi-autobiographical bildungsroman.

16. More than 30 years after delivering his standard sign-off on his popular TV series for the last time, this comedian said his final “good night” in 2008.
DICK MARTIN

17. His seventeen seasons with the oldest team in the NHL earned him a spot in the Hockey Hall of Fame, but he stated that his biggest professional thrill was winning his first Stanley Cup as a head coach.

18. Along with his Canadian colleague, this physicist earned a Nobel Prize for "the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor.”

19. Fourth president of the Royal Academy, this English painter was notable for his portraits of such notable figures as Queen Charlotte, Alexander MacKenzie, Fanny Kemble, and the Duke of Wellington.

20. As proprietor of the Emporia Gazzette, this journalist became a leading figure of the Progressive movement and spokesman for Middle America.
WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE

21. True to the principles of the group he founded, he turned down an honorary doctorate from Yale and refused to allow his picture to appear on the cover of Time magazine – indeed, most Americans were unaware of his full name until his 1971 obituaries.
BILL W.

22. He was founder and first bishop of the first independent African American church.
RICHARD ALLEN

23. One of the first English seamen to make his fortune in the Triangle Trade, he later helped build up the English navy and served as a vice admiral in the defeat of the Spanish Armada.
FRANCIS DRAKE

24. At the 2007 Kennedy Center Honors, Art Garfunkel referred to this troubled musical innovator as “rock’s gentlest revolutionary.” (Sadly, his two brothers were not there to join the tribute.)
BRIAN WILSON

25. Though she would have preferred to be remembered for her translation of Dante’s Divine Comedy, that work remains a footnote to her eleven mystery novels featuring one of fiction’s most beloved amateur sleuths.
DOROTHY SAYERS

26. In addition to his film career – which included Oscar nominations for writing and directing – he also hosted Saturday Night Live ten times, a record that was eventually broken by Steve Martin.
BUCK HENRY

27. His independent candidacy for President almost – but not quite – helped unseat the man who had succeeded him as Vice President.
HENRY WALLACE

28. During his relatively brief NFL career, this running back twice led the league in rushing attempts and became the first Giant to rush for 1,000 yards in a season.

29. This American scientist became embroiled in several nasty disputes, claiming retroactive priority over discoveries and inventions made by – among others – Samuel F.B. Morse and William T.G. Morton.

30. Though already convicted in the court of public opinion, she was acquitted of murder on July 5, 2011. (Social media was not pleased.)
CASEY ANTHONY

31. Speaking of social media, this Internet entrepreneur made a lot of friends through the site he co-founded in 2003 – and which, contrary to popular belief, still exists.

32. In the interval between Get Smart and The Golden Girls, he was the title character of the only winner of the Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series to have a title character. Got that?
BARNEY MILLER

33. This sociologist’s 1967 book Organizations in Action helped give rise to such fields of study as institutional theory and organizational equality.
JAMES THOMPSON

34. Both Paul McCartney and Julian Lennon have supported claims that this man was “the fifth Beatle,” though Julian’s father disparaged his contributions. (Of course; he would.)
BRIAN EPSTEIN? GEORGE MARTIN?

35. Often homeless and sometimes institutionalized, this American eccentric claimed to have authored the longest book ever written, and became the subject of a book and a subsequent film in which he was portrayed by Sir Ian Holm.

36. This playwright won the Pulitzer Prize for his incisive skewering of a middle class woman who valued her home above her husband.
GEORGE KELLY

37. He was the only director ever to receive an Oscar nomination for a German-language film.
WOLFGANG PETERSEN

38. This onetime fur trader is sometimes called the “Father of British Columbia,” serving as its first colonial governor from 1858 through 1864.
JOHN JACOB ASTOR

39. Six years after the Pistons bought out this player’s contract, they retired his number – the most recent number retired by that team.

40. A pioneer in the field of Google Hacking, this computer security expert also founded the non-profit group Hackers for Charity.

41. The Alabama state quarter honors this activist, a member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World and co-founder of the America Civil Liberties Union.
HELEN KELLER

42. He founded the empirical form of philosophy known as Australian Realism, based on the principle that "whatever exists … is real, that is to say it is a spatial and temporal situation or occurrence that is on the same level of reality as anything else that exists."

43. A leading figure in the transition from Federal architecture to Greek Revival, he designed many New England homes and also authored the first American pattern books, such as 1830’s Practical House Carpenter.

44. Known primarily for his menswear, this designer – who was knighted in 2000 for his services to the British fashion industry – has described his aesthetic as "well-made, good quality, simple cut, interesting fabric, easy to wear."
PAUL SMITH?

45. The trajectory of his life took him from the slave trade to a later career as a clergyman, abolitionist, and author of arguably the most popular hymn in the English-speaking world.
JOHN NEWTON

46. This general is almost exclusively remembered for the disastrous 1863 cavalry assault that bears his name.
GEORGE PICKETT

47. The title character of one of this novelist’s best known works is described as “a large, well-made, smooth-faced man of fifty, with something of a stylish cast perhaps, but every mark of capacity and kindness” … and also as “particularly small and particularly wicked-looking.”
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

48. Though he enjoyed a long career, especially on the British stage, he is best remembered today for a single film role which proved that – in the elegance department – he could give Fred Astaire a run for his money.
JACK BUCHANAN

49. His four-year stint as bassist for a pioneering thrash metal band ended with his death in a road accident at the age of 24.
CLIVE BURTON

50. Of her 26 Grand Slam titles, a record 19 were in women’s doubles and mixed doubles at Wimbledon
MARTINA NAVRATILOVA

51. The metric discovered by and named for this New Zealand mathematician provided an exact solution to the Einstein field equation of general relativity.
KERR

52. This justice authored the majority opinion in the landmark 1896 case that is now considered one of the worst decisions in Supreme Court history – and which was effectively overruled 58 years later.
HENRY BILLINGS BROWN

53. The comic strip he created in 1918 is the second longest-running strip in U.S. history – and the first in which the characters aged in (relatively) real time.
FRANK KING

54. This abolitionist became celebrated as “the Man with the Branded Hand” due to the punishment he received for trying to help seven runaway slaves to freedom.

55. This average American boy and his dog Ribsy were introduced in a 1950 children’s book that spawned a series of sequels featuring him and his friends.
HENRY HUGGINS

56. The sixth of eleven children, he was ten when his father was assassinated and only 39 when he himself died in a skiing accident
MICHAEL KENNEDY

57. This New Jersey businessman and public official was the last person to hold a post that had previously been held by the likes of Morgan Bulkeley, Ford Frick, and A. Bartlett Giamatti.
LEONARD COLEMAN

58. In 1579, this English clergyman broke from the Church of England to form an early Congregationalist church; though he himself soon return to the Anglican church, his influence remained, and the majority of the Separatists aboard the Mayflower were members of the sect that bore his name.

59. She wore many hats in her career – music arranger, vocal coach, nightclub performer, dancer – but is best remembered for the series of children’s books she wrote and for her one major film role as a character based on Diane Vreeland.
KAY THOMPSON

60. The seventeenth and last victim of this man’s 1966 killing spree died of kidney damage – 35 years later.
CHARLES WHITMAN?

61. This Philadelphia halfback was the first NFL player for more than ten touchdowns in a season – especially impressive since, at that time, teams only played twelve games a year.
STEVE VAN BUREN

62. Born in Tangipahoa Parish, he published his first cookbook at the age of 51 and didn’t become a national television celebrity until he was nearly 60.
JUSTIN WILSON?

63. The four stages of the process she helped define are excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.
VIRGINIA JOHNSON

64. After 15 years as the Speaker of the State Assembly, he became the first African American mayor of a major California city.
TOM BRADLEY? WILLIE BROWN?

65. Considered by Milton Friedman to be America’s greatest economist, he played a major role in developing the quantity theory of money, but his reputation did suffer major damage when he declared that the stock market had reached a “permanently high plateau” – in 1929.

66. He is the only living person to have commanded a mission that landed on the moon.

67. A Loyalist officer during the American Revolution, he gained notoriety for his role in the Cherry Valley Massacre.

68. DJMQ: One of the last living members of the “third generation” of American modern dance, he gained notoriety in 1957 with a study in non-movement that earned him a blank newspaper review and prompted Martha Graham to call him a “naughty boy.”
PAUL TAYLOR

69. One of the earliest poets of the English Renaissance, he helped introduce the sonnet form in England, though none of his own poems were published during his short lifetime.
CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE?

70. This master of the slow burn was originally offered the role of Fred Mertz, but had to decline because he was already playing foil to another popular comedienne. (He made up for it later.)
GEORGE BURNS? GALE GORDON?

71. Talk about durability: this singer-songwriter had his breakthrough hit in 1970 – with a song inspired by the suicide of a childhood friend – and achieved his first #1 album 45 years later.
JAMES TAYLOR

72. This Victorian illustrator and caricaturist helped create our images of what Fagin, Bill Sikes, and Mr. Bumble look like.

73. It was not Charles Darwin, but this British philosopher, who coined the four-word phrase most popularly associated with Darwinism –especially in its social applications.
SPENCER? ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE?

74. This businessman began working for Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1963 … became president several years after its name change … continued as CEO after its 1999 mega-merger … and finally retired – very profitably – in 2005.

75. This two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize is the senior member of the Chicago Tribune’s editorial board, but many of us know him best from his long tenure on The McLaughlin Group.

76. In addition to building the first American steam locomotive and operating the first U.S. ferry service, this inventor also played a major role in establishing U.S. patent law.

77. This onetime state governor effectively killed his own presidential aspirations on January 19, 2004. (Yeah!)
HOWARD DEAN

78. This cowboy was quite impressed by what he saw on his visit to a major Missouri city – especially the indoor toilets and the nude dancing girls.
WILL PARKER

79. Over the course of 20 seasons, this coach led two different teams to a total of 11 NBA championships.
PHIL JACKSON

80. The most famous – and most parodied – line penned by this playwright was, "Years from now, when you speak of this – and you will – be kind."
ROBERT ANDERSON

81. This performer has won five Emmy awards for his contributions to three different shows – an unscripted comedy show, an eponymous talk show, and a game show.
WAYNE BRADY

82. Talk about durability: at the age of 85, this singer became the oldest artist to make an appearance on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as the oldest living artist to hit Number One on the album chart.
TONY BENNETT

83. He became the most celebrated of the three radicals who founded the Black Guerrilla Family in 1970.

84. She hated life in Washington, D.C. She didn’t want her husband to be a Senator. She didn’t want her husband to be President. She did not attend his inauguration. She spent most of her years in the White House secluded upstairs, writing letters to her dead son. It took her nearly two years to finally make her first official public appearance as First Lady. (Oh, and her husband drank.)
JANE PIERCE

85. In 1854, this British tobacconist introduced an eponymous brand of “English ovals” – and an empire was (eventually) born.

86. In the 1920s, he became one of the first evangelists to broadcast over the radio and founded an institution to combat what he saw as the dangerous secularization of American higher education.

87. In 1953, this political theorist published a book that played a large role in shaping the modern American conservative movement; toward the end of his life, he became a vocal critic of Republican militarism and U.S. involvement in the Gulf War.

88. He served as Deputy Secretary of State under one Democratic President and – after a hiatus of twelve years – Secretary of State under the next Democratic President.
CORDELL HULL

89. This British physiologist won the Nobel Prize for his development of the procedure that led to the birth of Louise Brown.
ROBERT EDWARDS

90. He completes the following list of U.S. Open winners: Horace Rawlins; Joe Lloyd; George Sargent; Jim Barnes; Cyril Walker; Tony Jacklin.
JUSTIN ROSE

91. This poet was the 17th successor to the poet in Clue #5, but he became a dirty word to some who blamed him for the death another poet.

92. After his biggest hit reached Number One in 1962, this R&B singer began sporting a top hat, cape, monocle, and cane.
GENE CHANDLER

93. A member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, this British actor is best known in the United States for his Tony-winning role in which he taught us all how to do the Lambeth Walk.

94. This crime lord once said, “I wanted to be rich. I wanted to be Donald Trump rich, and so help me God, I made it" – but, despite some claims, he probably didn’t make it by smuggling drugs in the coffins of dead American soldiers.

95. This American painter was notable for his portraits of such notable figures as John and Abigail Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Jay, John Jacob Astor, and even King George III – but he is best known for an unfinished portrait of somebody else.
GILBERT STUART

96. He was the protagonist of a linked series of more than 20 semi-autobiographical short stories written by arguably – as I called him in my last general knowledge game – the most influential American novelist of the 20th century.

97. This onetime dressmaker was once dubbed “the most dangerous woman in America” for her role as a union recruiter and strike organizer.
MARY HARRIS JONES

98. Lauded as the “organizer of victory” by Winston Churchill, he later became the only professional military officer to win the Nobel Peace Prize.
GEORGE MARSHALL

99. In 1833, this English physiologist propounded the theory that the spinal cord is comprised by a chain of units that functions as an independent reflex arcs.

100. One of the chief proponents of the philosophical school of pragmatism, he also was a major figure in the development of progressive education.

101. Though Mark Twain mercilessly skewered this novelist’s style, D.H. Lawrence praised him for the beauty of his writing and for his role in shaping an American mythology.
JAMES FENIMORE COOPER?

102. This former U.S. Senator was the chief architect of a 1998 agreement that helped bring peace to one of the more trouble regions of the world.
GEORGE MITCHELL

103. Talk about durability: this two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for music published his last work only a few months before his death – at the age of 103.
EUBIE BLAKE?

104. Often referred to as “the black Babe Ruth,” he became the second player inducted into the Hall of Fame for his career in the Negro leagues.
JOSH GIBSON

105. As you may recall from my last movie game, this director was the very first recipient of the AFI Lifetime Achievement Award.
JOHN FORD

ASSOCIATED WORDS
#20
Shakespeare
Spenser
Hardy
Strouse
Berkeley
MacDonald
Duran
Dodd
West
Kramer
Chapman
Jefferson
Clinton
Trump
Margaret
Donna
Albert
Peggy
Jerry
Greg
Gilda
Floyd
Dennis
Ali
Bonnie
Clarence
Mark
Def
Tammy
Jesse
Fred
Tor
Mick
Mickey
Daisy
Daffy
Faith
Charity
Buck
Panther
Horse
Rooster
Hound
Sheep
Foxes
Whales
Fighters
Rascals
Murderers
Sniper
Rifleman
Spy
Devil
Standup
Jerk
Giant
Patriot
Mayor
Chief
Chaplain
Martyr
Astronomer
Naturalist
Trapper
Media Mogul
Godfather
Wife
VP
OK
HUD
North Carolina
South Carolina
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Las Vegas
Seattle
Detroit
San Antonio
St. Louis
Baltimore
Nuremberg
Manila
Flatbush
Chesapeake
Nile
Neverland
Oz
Mercury
Apollo
Capricorn
Empty
Metaphysical
Spiritual
Bewitched
Wicked
Lust
Sin
Virtue
Property
Cello
Piccolo
Makeover
Reconstruction
Gold Rush
Golf
Poker
Swing
Jump
Press
Blow
Chop
Jelly
Ice Cream
Upstairs
Laundry
Enterprise
Arcades
College
Funk
Fever
Anesthesia
Formula
Ion
Magnetism
Circuit
Ferry
Train
One Way
Patches
Rules
Wars
Front Page
Middle
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Lost
This Week
Last Summer
Farewell


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 1:01 am 
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A Non E. Muss wrote:
49. His four-year stint as bassist for a pioneering thrash metal band ended with his death in a road accident at the age of 24.

CLIVE BURTON (of Metallica)


Whoops! This is a mistake on my part. His name is Cliff Burton, not Clive.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 5:05 am 
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First pass...

4. Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in its second year of existence, this pitcher set a record that has stood for more than 100 years – and, safe to say, will never be broken.

CY YOUNG (must be his 500+ wins)

5. The dominant literary figure of the Restoration, this poet-playwright-essayist-critic-translator was England’s first official Poet Laureate.

JOHN DRYDEN

7. In my first game show appearance in 1991, I correctly surmised in Final Jeopardy that the largest Fortune 500 company named for a person was the company founded by this man. (I still lost.)

HENRY FORD?

14. This politician – who served four years as his state’s lone Representative in the House followed by thirty years in the Senate – is best known for sponsoring a retirement plan.

WILLIAM ROTH

26. In addition to his film career – which included Oscar nominations for writing and directing – he also hosted Saturday Night Live ten times, a record that was eventually broken by Steve Martin.

BUCK HENRY

31. Speaking of social media, this Internet entrepreneur made a lot of friends through the site he co-founded in 2003 – and which, contrary to popular belief, still exists.

Probably TOM ANDERSON of MySpace

32. In the interval between Get Smart and The Golden Girls, he was the title character of the only winner of the Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series to have a title character. Got that?

BARNEY MILLER

39. Six years after the Pistons bought out this player’s contract, they retired his number – the most recent number retired by that team.

RICHARD "RIP" HAMILTON

41. The Alabama state quarter honors this activist, a member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World and co-founder of the America Civil Liberties Union.

HELEN KELLER

64. After 15 years as the Speaker of the State Assembly, he became the first African American mayor of a major California city.

TOM BRADLEY seems too obvious, but he's the only person I can think of right now

73. It was not Charles Darwin, but this British philosopher, who coined the four-word phrase most popularly associated with Darwinism –especially in its social applications.

HERBERT SPENCER ("survival of the fittest")

74. This businessman began working for Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1963 … became president several years after its name change … continued as CEO after its 1999 mega-merger … and finally retired – very profitably – in 2005.

LEE RAYMOND of Exxon, notorious for receiving that massive nine-figure golden parachute

75. This two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize is the senior member of the Chicago Tribune’s editorial board, but many of us know him best from his long tenure on The McLaughlin Group.

CLARENCE PAGE

77. This onetime state governor effectively killed his own presidential aspirations on January 19, 2004. (Yeah!)

HOWARD DEAN

79. Over the course of 20 seasons, this coach led two different teams to a total of 11 NBA championships.

PHIL JACKSON

81. This performer has won five Emmy awards for his contributions to three different shows – an unscripted comedy show, an eponymous talk show, and a game show.

WAYNE BRADY

82. Talk about durability: at the age of 85, this singer became the oldest artist to make an appearance on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as the oldest living artist to hit Number One on the album chart.

TONY BENNETT

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"... the baseless self-serving persecution foisted upon the Bored by Beast, Estonut, jarnon, Bob#s, and Weasel [in June]. Nonetheless, my life and this game go on as scheduled. Both my life and this game MUST go on, full speed, in direct defiance of the prejudice. Otherwise, the terrorists win."


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 7:34 am 
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13. Since his beatboxing skills helped him win second place on a popular competition series, he has released three albums – with steadily diminishing success.

BLAKE LEWIS (The last of many faves I remember my Mom having on American Idol before I finally tuned her out (and moved out)....


70. This master of the slow burn was originally offered the role of Fred Mertz, but had to decline because he was already playing foil to another popular comedienne. (He made up for it later.)
GEORGE BURNS? GALE GORDON?

Definitely Gale Gordon. I remember my Nick at Nite trivia...

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Thursday comics! Squirrel pictures! The link to my CafePress store! All kinds of fun stuff!!!!

Visit my Evil Squirrel blog here: http://evilsquirrelsnest.com


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 11:15 am 
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38. should be JAMES DOUGLAS

50. should be ELIZABETH RYAN

This is going to be a fun one.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 11:31 am 
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88. He served as Deputy Secretary of State under one Democratic President and – after a hiatus of twelve years – Secretary of State under the next Democratic President.
CORDELL HULL

I am pretty sure this can't be Hull. He was in Congress during Wilson's administration - formulating the federal income tax laws.

How about WARREN CHRISTOPHER? Wasn't he in the Carter Administration, then Clinton's?


Last edited by mellytu74 on Tue Aug 28, 2018 11:34 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 11:31 am 
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mrkelley23 wrote:
38. should be JAMES DOUGLAS

50. should be ELIZABETH RYAN

This is going to be a fun one.


All Frank's puzzles are fun! :D


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 12:00 pm 
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8 is Bill T Jones.

_________________
Here's Wylie's kick, it's high, it holds
up there, Rodgers takes the ball at the 30, he's hit and got away,
back up field to the 35, to the 40, he's to the 45, he's to the 50 to
the 45, to the 40, to the 35, to the 20, to the 10, he's all the way
home........[crowd cheering].......HOLY MOLY, MAN, WOMAN AND CHILD DID
THAT PUT 'EM IN THE AISLES.....JOHNNY THE JET RODGERS JUST TORE 'EM
LOOSE FROM THEIR SHOES!!!


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 12:53 pm 
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Quote:
23. One of the first English seamen to make his fortune in the Triangle Trade, he later helped build up the English navy and served as a vice admiral in the defeat of the Spanish Armada.
FRANCIS DRAKE
No, it's Drake's cousin, JOHN HAWKINS.

Since the four wrong definites have been found, the others must be right.

I also looked up the incomplete names:
21. BILL W(ILSON)
51. ROY KERR


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 1:15 pm 
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Updated consolidation...

Identify the 105 people in the clues below. Match them into 35 groups of three according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each threesome with FOUR of the Associated Words.

No name will be used twice.

There are some possible alternate pairs, but if you can make an alternate threesome, I’ll be astounded. This may be tough, but you'll work it out.

1. BILL CLINTON
2. JAMES CLERK MAXWELL
3. GLENN MILLER
4. CY YOUNG

5. The dominant literary figure of the Restoration, this poet-playwright-essayist-critic-translator was England’s first official Poet Laureate.
JOHN DRYDEN

6. MICHAEL CRAWFORD
7. HENRY FORD

8. DJMQ: This influential dancer and choreographer has created several major works in response to the AIDS epidemic, including one work inspired by the death of his partner and another inspired by his own HIV diagnosis.
Another DJMQ appears at #68.
MICHAEL BENNETT? BILL T JONES?

9. HENRY ADAMS
10. WILLIAM CLARK
11. PERRY MASON

12. The most important work of this British idealist philosopher was an 1893 study about the gap between appearances and reality.

13. Since his beatboxing skills helped him win second place on a popular competition series, he has released three albums – with steadily diminishing success.
BLAKE LEWIS

14. WILLIAM ROTH

15. While Victoria was still on the throne, this English writer helped lead the charge against Victorianism with a satirical utopian novel and a cynical, semi-autobiographical bildungsroman.

16. DICK MARTIN

17. His seventeen seasons with the oldest team in the NHL earned him a spot in the Hockey Hall of Fame, but he stated that his biggest professional thrill was winning his first Stanley Cup as a head coach.

18. Along with his Canadian colleague, this physicist earned a Nobel Prize for "the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor.”

19. Fourth president of the Royal Academy, this English painter was notable for his portraits of such notable figures as Queen Charlotte, Alexander MacKenzie, Fanny Kemble, and the Duke of Wellington.

20. WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE
21. BILL W(ILSON)
22. RICHARD ALLEN

23. One of the first English seamen to make his fortune in the Triangle Trade, he later helped build up the English navy and served as a vice admiral in the defeat of the Spanish Armada.
JOHN HAWKINS

24. BRIAN WILSON
25. DOROTHY SAYERS
26. BUCK HENRY
27. HENRY WALLACE

28. During his relatively brief NFL career, this running back twice led the league in rushing attempts and became the first Giant to rush for 1,000 yards in a season.

29. This American scientist became embroiled in several nasty disputes, claiming retroactive priority over discoveries and inventions made by – among others – Samuel F.B. Morse and William T.G. Morton.

30. CASEY ANTHONY

31. Speaking of social media, this Internet entrepreneur made a lot of friends through the site he co-founded in 2003 – and which, contrary to popular belief, still exists.
TOM ANDERSON

32. BARNEY MILLER
33. JAMES THOMPSON

34. Both Paul McCartney and Julian Lennon have supported claims that this man was “the fifth Beatle,” though Julian’s father disparaged his contributions. (Of course; he would.)
BRIAN EPSTEIN? GEORGE MARTIN?

35. Often homeless and sometimes institutionalized, this American eccentric claimed to have authored the longest book ever written, and became the subject of a book and a subsequent film in which he was portrayed by Sir Ian Holm.

36. GEORGE KELLY
37. WOLFGANG PETERSEN

38. This onetime fur trader is sometimes called the “Father of British Columbia,” serving as its first colonial governor from 1858 through 1864.
JAMES DOUGLAS

39. Six years after the Pistons bought out this player’s contract, they retired his number – the most recent number retired by that team.
RICHARD "RIP" HAMILTON

40. A pioneer in the field of Google Hacking, this computer security expert also founded the non-profit group Hackers for Charity.

41. HELEN KELLER

42. He founded the empirical form of philosophy known as Australian Realism, based on the principle that "whatever exists … is real, that is to say it is a spatial and temporal situation or occurrence that is on the same level of reality as anything else that exists."

43. A leading figure in the transition from Federal architecture to Greek Revival, he designed many New England homes and also authored the first American pattern books, such as 1830’s Practical House Carpenter.

44. Known primarily for his menswear, this designer – who was knighted in 2000 for his services to the British fashion industry – has described his aesthetic as "well-made, good quality, simple cut, interesting fabric, easy to wear."
PAUL SMITH?

45. JOHN NEWTON
46. GEORGE PICKETT
47. ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON
48. JACK BUCHANAN
49. CLIFF BURTON

50. Of her 26 Grand Slam titles, a record 19 were in women’s doubles and mixed doubles at Wimbledon
ELIZABETH RYAN

51. ROY KERR
52. HENRY BILLINGS BROWN
53. FRANK KING

54. This abolitionist became celebrated as “the Man with the Branded Hand” due to the punishment he received for trying to help seven runaway slaves to freedom.

55. HENRY HUGGINS
56. MICHAEL KENNEDY
57. LEONARD COLEMAN

58. In 1579, this English clergyman broke from the Church of England to form an early Congregationalist church; though he himself soon return to the Anglican church, his influence remained, and the majority of the Separatists aboard the Mayflower were members of the sect that bore his name.

59. KAY THOMPSON

60. The seventeenth and last victim of this man’s 1966 killing spree died of kidney damage – 35 years later.
CHARLES WHITMAN?

61. STEVE VAN BUREN

62. Born in Tangipahoa Parish, he published his first cookbook at the age of 51 and didn’t become a national television celebrity until he was nearly 60.
JUSTIN WILSON?

63. VIRGINIA JOHNSON

64. After 15 years as the Speaker of the State Assembly, he became the first African American mayor of a major California city.
TOM BRADLEY? WILLIE BROWN?

65. Considered by Milton Friedman to be America’s greatest economist, he played a major role in developing the quantity theory of money, but his reputation did suffer major damage when he declared that the stock market had reached a “permanently high plateau” – in 1929.

66. He is the only living person to have commanded a mission that landed on the moon.

67. A Loyalist officer during the American Revolution, he gained notoriety for his role in the Cherry Valley Massacre.

68. PAUL TAYLOR

69. One of the earliest poets of the English Renaissance, he helped introduce the sonnet form in England, though none of his own poems were published during his short lifetime.
CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE?

70. This master of the slow burn was originally offered the role of Fred Mertz, but had to decline because he was already playing foil to another popular comedienne. (He made up for it later.)
GALE GORDON

71. JAMES TAYLOR

72. This Victorian illustrator and caricaturist helped create our images of what Fagin, Bill Sikes, and Mr. Bumble look like.

73. It was not Charles Darwin, but this British philosopher, who coined the four-word phrase most popularly associated with Darwinism –especially in its social applications.
HERBERT SPENCER

74. This businessman began working for Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1963 … became president several years after its name change … continued as CEO after its 1999 mega-merger … and finally retired – very profitably – in 2005.
LEE RAYMOND

75. This two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize is the senior member of the Chicago Tribune’s editorial board, but many of us know him best from his long tenure on The McLaughlin Group.
CLARENCE PAGE

76. In addition to building the first American steam locomotive and operating the first U.S. ferry service, this inventor also played a major role in establishing U.S. patent law.

77. HOWARD DEAN
78. WILL PARKER
79. PHIL JACKSON
80. ROBERT ANDERSON
81. WAYNE BRADY
82. TONY BENNETT

83. He became the most celebrated of the three radicals who founded the Black Guerrilla Family in 1970.

84. JANE PIERCE

85. In 1854, this British tobacconist introduced an eponymous brand of “English ovals” – and an empire was (eventually) born.

86. In the 1920s, he became one of the first evangelists to broadcast over the radio and founded an institution to combat what he saw as the dangerous secularization of American higher education.

87. In 1953, this political theorist published a book that played a large role in shaping the modern American conservative movement; toward the end of his life, he became a vocal critic of Republican militarism and U.S. involvement in the Gulf War.

88. He served as Deputy Secretary of State under one Democratic President and – after a hiatus of twelve years – Secretary of State under the next Democratic President.
WARREN CHRISTOPHER?

89. ROBERT EDWARDS
90. JUSTIN ROSE

91. This poet was the 17th successor to the poet in Clue #5, but he became a dirty word to some who blamed him for the death another poet.

92. GENE CHANDLER

93. A member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, this British actor is best known in the United States for his Tony-winning role in which he taught us all how to do the Lambeth Walk.

94. This crime lord once said, “I wanted to be rich. I wanted to be Donald Trump rich, and so help me God, I made it" – but, despite some claims, he probably didn’t make it by smuggling drugs in the coffins of dead American soldiers.

95. GILBERT STUART

96. He was the protagonist of a linked series of more than 20 semi-autobiographical short stories written by arguably – as I called him in my last general knowledge game – the most influential American novelist of the 20th century.

97. MARY HARRIS JONES
98. GEORGE MARSHALL

99. In 1833, this English physiologist propounded the theory that the spinal cord is comprised by a chain of units that functions as an independent reflex arcs.

100. One of the chief proponents of the philosophical school of pragmatism, he also was a major figure in the development of progressive education.

101. Though Mark Twain mercilessly skewered this novelist’s style, D.H. Lawrence praised him for the beauty of his writing and for his role in shaping an American mythology.
JAMES FENIMORE COOPER?

102. GEORGE MITCHELL

103. Talk about durability: this two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for music published his last work only a few months before his death – at the age of 103.
EUBIE BLAKE?

104. JOSH GIBSON
105. JOHN FORD

ASSOCIATED WORDS
#20
Shakespeare
Spenser
Hardy
Strouse
Berkeley
MacDonald
Duran
Dodd
West
Kramer
Chapman
Jefferson
Clinton
Trump
Margaret
Donna
Albert
Peggy
Jerry
Greg
Gilda
Floyd
Dennis
Ali
Bonnie
Clarence
Mark
Def
Tammy
Jesse
Fred
Tor
Mick
Mickey
Daisy
Daffy
Faith
Charity
Buck
Panther
Horse
Rooster
Hound
Sheep
Foxes
Whales
Fighters
Rascals
Murderers
Sniper
Rifleman
Spy
Devil
Standup
Jerk
Giant
Patriot
Mayor
Chief
Chaplain
Martyr
Astronomer
Naturalist
Trapper
Media Mogul
Godfather
Wife
VP
OK
HUD
North Carolina
South Carolina
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Las Vegas
Seattle
Detroit
San Antonio
St. Louis
Baltimore
Nuremberg
Manila
Flatbush
Chesapeake
Nile
Neverland
Oz
Mercury
Apollo
Capricorn
Empty
Metaphysical
Spiritual
Bewitched
Wicked
Lust
Sin
Virtue
Property
Cello
Piccolo
Makeover
Reconstruction
Gold Rush
Golf
Poker
Swing
Jump
Press
Blow
Chop
Jelly
Ice Cream
Upstairs
Laundry
Enterprise
Arcades
College
Funk
Fever
Anesthesia
Formula
Ion
Magnetism
Circuit
Ferry
Train
One Way
Patches
Rules
Wars
Front Page
Middle
Center
Lost
This Week
Last Summer
Farewell


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 1:18 pm 
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jarnon wrote:
Lots of repeated surnames (MILLER, FORD, BENNETT, MARTIN, WILSON, WALLACE, THOMPSON, BROWN, TAYLOR). Repeated first names too, but that’s not as unusual.

Also ANDERSON, JONES and LEWIS (no wait it was CLARK)


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 3:22 pm 
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jarnon wrote:
46. This general is almost exclusively remembered for the disastrous 1863 cavalry assault that bears his name.
GEORGE PICKETT



I really don't think this is Pickett. There was very little cavalry involved in Picckett's Charge

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 3:38 pm 
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kroxquo wrote:
jarnon wrote:
46. This general is almost exclusively remembered for the disastrous 1863 cavalry assault that bears his name.
GEORGE PICKETT



I really don't think this is Pickett. There was very little cavalry involved in Picckett's Charge


In that case, it's a mistake on my part.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 3:42 pm 
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All the definite answers are right.

Of those single answers with a question mark, five are right and two are wrong.

All of the ones with multiple answers include the right answer.

jarnon wrote:
Updated consolidation...

Identify the 105 people in the clues below. Match them into 35 groups of three according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each threesome with FOUR of the Associated Words.

No name will be used twice.

There are some possible alternate pairs, but if you can make an alternate threesome, I’ll be astounded. This may be tough, but you'll work it out.

1. BILL CLINTON
2. JAMES CLERK MAXWELL
3. GLENN MILLER
4. CY YOUNG

5. The dominant literary figure of the Restoration, this poet-playwright-essayist-critic-translator was England’s first official Poet Laureate.
JOHN DRYDEN

6. MICHAEL CRAWFORD
7. HENRY FORD

8. DJMQ: This influential dancer and choreographer has created several major works in response to the AIDS epidemic, including one work inspired by the death of his partner and another inspired by his own HIV diagnosis.
Another DJMQ appears at #68.
MICHAEL BENNETT? BILL T JONES?

9. HENRY ADAMS
10. WILLIAM CLARK
11. PERRY MASON

12. The most important work of this British idealist philosopher was an 1893 study about the gap between appearances and reality.

13. Since his beatboxing skills helped him win second place on a popular competition series, he has released three albums – with steadily diminishing success.
BLAKE LEWIS

14. WILLIAM ROTH

15. While Victoria was still on the throne, this English writer helped lead the charge against Victorianism with a satirical utopian novel and a cynical, semi-autobiographical bildungsroman.

16. DICK MARTIN

17. His seventeen seasons with the oldest team in the NHL earned him a spot in the Hockey Hall of Fame, but he stated that his biggest professional thrill was winning his first Stanley Cup as a head coach.

18. Along with his Canadian colleague, this physicist earned a Nobel Prize for "the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor.”

19. Fourth president of the Royal Academy, this English painter was notable for his portraits of such notable figures as Queen Charlotte, Alexander MacKenzie, Fanny Kemble, and the Duke of Wellington.

20. WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE
21. BILL W(ILSON)
22. RICHARD ALLEN

23. One of the first English seamen to make his fortune in the Triangle Trade, he later helped build up the English navy and served as a vice admiral in the defeat of the Spanish Armada.
JOHN HAWKINS

24. BRIAN WILSON
25. DOROTHY SAYERS
26. BUCK HENRY
27. HENRY WALLACE

28. During his relatively brief NFL career, this running back twice led the league in rushing attempts and became the first Giant to rush for 1,000 yards in a season.

29. This American scientist became embroiled in several nasty disputes, claiming retroactive priority over discoveries and inventions made by – among others – Samuel F.B. Morse and William T.G. Morton.

30. CASEY ANTHONY

31. Speaking of social media, this Internet entrepreneur made a lot of friends through the site he co-founded in 2003 – and which, contrary to popular belief, still exists.
TOM ANDERSON

32. BARNEY MILLER
33. JAMES THOMPSON

34. Both Paul McCartney and Julian Lennon have supported claims that this man was “the fifth Beatle,” though Julian’s father disparaged his contributions. (Of course; he would.)
BRIAN EPSTEIN? GEORGE MARTIN?

35. Often homeless and sometimes institutionalized, this American eccentric claimed to have authored the longest book ever written, and became the subject of a book and a subsequent film in which he was portrayed by Sir Ian Holm.

36. GEORGE KELLY
37. WOLFGANG PETERSEN

38. This onetime fur trader is sometimes called the “Father of British Columbia,” serving as its first colonial governor from 1858 through 1864.
JAMES DOUGLAS

39. Six years after the Pistons bought out this player’s contract, they retired his number – the most recent number retired by that team.
RICHARD "RIP" HAMILTON

40. A pioneer in the field of Google Hacking, this computer security expert also founded the non-profit group Hackers for Charity.

41. HELEN KELLER

42. He founded the empirical form of philosophy known as Australian Realism, based on the principle that "whatever exists … is real, that is to say it is a spatial and temporal situation or occurrence that is on the same level of reality as anything else that exists."

43. A leading figure in the transition from Federal architecture to Greek Revival, he designed many New England homes and also authored the first American pattern books, such as 1830’s Practical House Carpenter.

44. Known primarily for his menswear, this designer – who was knighted in 2000 for his services to the British fashion industry – has described his aesthetic as "well-made, good quality, simple cut, interesting fabric, easy to wear."
PAUL SMITH?

45. JOHN NEWTON
46. GEORGE PICKETT
47. ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON
48. JACK BUCHANAN
49. CLIFF BURTON

50. Of her 26 Grand Slam titles, a record 19 were in women’s doubles and mixed doubles at Wimbledon
ELIZABETH RYAN

51. ROY KERR
52. HENRY BILLINGS BROWN
53. FRANK KING

54. This abolitionist became celebrated as “the Man with the Branded Hand” due to the punishment he received for trying to help seven runaway slaves to freedom.

55. HENRY HUGGINS
56. MICHAEL KENNEDY
57. LEONARD COLEMAN

58. In 1579, this English clergyman broke from the Church of England to form an early Congregationalist church; though he himself soon return to the Anglican church, his influence remained, and the majority of the Separatists aboard the Mayflower were members of the sect that bore his name.

59. KAY THOMPSON

60. The seventeenth and last victim of this man’s 1966 killing spree died of kidney damage – 35 years later.
CHARLES WHITMAN?

61. STEVE VAN BUREN

62. Born in Tangipahoa Parish, he published his first cookbook at the age of 51 and didn’t become a national television celebrity until he was nearly 60.
JUSTIN WILSON?

63. VIRGINIA JOHNSON

64. After 15 years as the Speaker of the State Assembly, he became the first African American mayor of a major California city.
TOM BRADLEY? WILLIE BROWN?

65. Considered by Milton Friedman to be America’s greatest economist, he played a major role in developing the quantity theory of money, but his reputation did suffer major damage when he declared that the stock market had reached a “permanently high plateau” – in 1929.

66. He is the only living person to have commanded a mission that landed on the moon.

67. A Loyalist officer during the American Revolution, he gained notoriety for his role in the Cherry Valley Massacre.

68. PAUL TAYLOR

69. One of the earliest poets of the English Renaissance, he helped introduce the sonnet form in England, though none of his own poems were published during his short lifetime.
CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE?

70. This master of the slow burn was originally offered the role of Fred Mertz, but had to decline because he was already playing foil to another popular comedienne. (He made up for it later.)
GALE GORDON

71. JAMES TAYLOR

72. This Victorian illustrator and caricaturist helped create our images of what Fagin, Bill Sikes, and Mr. Bumble look like.

73. It was not Charles Darwin, but this British philosopher, who coined the four-word phrase most popularly associated with Darwinism –especially in its social applications.
HERBERT SPENCER

74. This businessman began working for Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1963 … became president several years after its name change … continued as CEO after its 1999 mega-merger … and finally retired – very profitably – in 2005.
LEE RAYMOND

75. This two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize is the senior member of the Chicago Tribune’s editorial board, but many of us know him best from his long tenure on The McLaughlin Group.
CLARENCE PAGE

76. In addition to building the first American steam locomotive and operating the first U.S. ferry service, this inventor also played a major role in establishing U.S. patent law.

77. HOWARD DEAN
78. WILL PARKER
79. PHIL JACKSON
80. ROBERT ANDERSON
81. WAYNE BRADY
82. TONY BENNETT

83. He became the most celebrated of the three radicals who founded the Black Guerrilla Family in 1970.

84. JANE PIERCE

85. In 1854, this British tobacconist introduced an eponymous brand of “English ovals” – and an empire was (eventually) born.

86. In the 1920s, he became one of the first evangelists to broadcast over the radio and founded an institution to combat what he saw as the dangerous secularization of American higher education.

87. In 1953, this political theorist published a book that played a large role in shaping the modern American conservative movement; toward the end of his life, he became a vocal critic of Republican militarism and U.S. involvement in the Gulf War.

88. He served as Deputy Secretary of State under one Democratic President and – after a hiatus of twelve years – Secretary of State under the next Democratic President.
WARREN CHRISTOPHER?

89. ROBERT EDWARDS
90. JUSTIN ROSE

91. This poet was the 17th successor to the poet in Clue #5, but he became a dirty word to some who blamed him for the death another poet.

92. GENE CHANDLER

93. A member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, this British actor is best known in the United States for his Tony-winning role in which he taught us all how to do the Lambeth Walk.

94. This crime lord once said, “I wanted to be rich. I wanted to be Donald Trump rich, and so help me God, I made it" – but, despite some claims, he probably didn’t make it by smuggling drugs in the coffins of dead American soldiers.

95. GILBERT STUART

96. He was the protagonist of a linked series of more than 20 semi-autobiographical short stories written by arguably – as I called him in my last general knowledge game – the most influential American novelist of the 20th century.

97. MARY HARRIS JONES
98. GEORGE MARSHALL

99. In 1833, this English physiologist propounded the theory that the spinal cord is comprised by a chain of units that functions as an independent reflex arcs.

100. One of the chief proponents of the philosophical school of pragmatism, he also was a major figure in the development of progressive education.

101. Though Mark Twain mercilessly skewered this novelist’s style, D.H. Lawrence praised him for the beauty of his writing and for his role in shaping an American mythology.
JAMES FENIMORE COOPER?

102. GEORGE MITCHELL

103. Talk about durability: this two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for music published his last work only a few months before his death – at the age of 103.
EUBIE BLAKE?

104. JOSH GIBSON
105. JOHN FORD

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