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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 9:07 am 
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in order to make T look bad.

I guess they can all walk out of their graves now.

I would like to learn that trick for several friends of mine.

Me too, when I need it.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 9:20 am 
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ghostjmf wrote:
in order to make T look bad.

I guess they can all walk out of their graves now.

I would like to learn that trick for several friends of mine.

Me too, when I need it.


Fake Deaths.

For what it's worth, the initial estimates were based on verifiable deaths due to the hurricane from such causes as drowning and being struck by debris. In addition, accurate reporting was very spotty for a long time due to lack of power and communications. The most recent figures are based on comparisons of the death rates last year as compared to earlier years, and there was a sudden spike; that's the usual current method of calculating deaths due to catastrophes. Many people did die from various diseases, but the sudden spike is attributable to unsanitary conditions, lack of medicine and medical treatment, exposure, and other factors that led to the deaths and not merely "old age" as Trump claims. A person who dies of diabetes because there's no insulin available is attributable to the hurricane in every world except that of Donald Trump. The failure to restore normal livable conditions for months led to a substantial increase in the mortality rate.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 9:29 am 
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Trump claims that everyone who died in PR in the last year, even of old age, was counted, and in reality, the recovery from Maria was a great success.

Hardly the first time Trump has denied official statistics. But he picked a bad week to start this fight.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 9:40 am 
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jarnon wrote:
Hardly the first time Trump has denied official statistics. But he picked a bad week to start this fight.


These statistics underscore just how slipshod the relief efforts were. The initial death toll was considerably lower than what often occurs in other Caribbean islands partly because construction, drainage, etc. were better overall in Puerto Rico than on those other islands. But when you don't have power and reliable food and water for months, more people will die. What's a real tragedy is that the US media pretty much ignored this story, unlike the coverage of hurricanes in the continental US, and, of course, Trump was in no hurry to do anything about it.

Just this week, we learned that there are thousands of water bottles still sitting on a runway in Puerto Rico while people were using spring and rain water, much of it questionably sanitary, for drinking and cooking.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/09/12/us/puert ... index.html

But those are fake bottles, too, I'm sure.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 9:45 am 
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silverscreenselect wrote:
Just this week, we learned that there are thousands of water bottles still sitting on a runway in Puerto Rico while people were using spring and rain water, much of it questionably sanitary, for drinking and cooking.


Who is responsible for that? Not Trump. Not the federal government. Look at who is "in charge" of local politics. You won't like the answer, but like Bobbie says, you don't get your own facts.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 10:01 am 
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BackInTex wrote:
silverscreenselect wrote:
Just this week, we learned that there are thousands of water bottles still sitting on a runway in Puerto Rico while people were using spring and rain water, much of it questionably sanitary, for drinking and cooking.


Who is responsible for that? Not Trump. Not the federal government.


Actually in this case Yes, the federal government, because that water was under FEMA's control for months before local officials learned of it, and by the time they took some of it, they learned, not surprisingly, that a good bit of it had gone bad left out in tropical conditions for seven months.

From the article I cited:

Quote:
FEMA handles getting the supplies to the state or commonwealth, who in turn handle distributing those items at a local level, said Jeff Byard, FEMA Associate Administrator for Response and Recovery. "Obviously with Maria, we had not a supply issue, we had distribution issues," he said during a briefing about Hurricane Florence. Ottmar Chavez, now administrator of Puerto Rico's General Services Administration, said FEMA reported that it had about 20,000 pallets of bottled water in excess in May this year, before Chavez was appointed. His agency claimed the water, intending to deliver it where it was needed.

But after about 700 pallets had been distributed, complaints began to come in about the water's foul smell and taste, Chavez said in a statement. "In light of this, we have been in contact with FEMA and the Department of Health to test the water inventory received by the federal agency. We are going to return those waters," he said. The mayor of Ceiba, Angel Cruz Ramos, told CNN he's grateful for the generosity, but believes that too much water was delivered at the wrong time. "The time and heat has made it bad," he added.


Could that water have been used earlier? Of course. Over half the island didn't have enough water to drink.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/nat ... 06efc0fe2d

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 1:17 pm 
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silverscreenselect wrote:
BackInTex wrote:
silverscreenselect wrote:
Just this week, we learned that there are thousands of water bottles still sitting on a runway in Puerto Rico while people were using spring and rain water, much of it questionably sanitary, for drinking and cooking.


Who is responsible for that? Not Trump. Not the federal government.


Actually in this case Yes, the federal government, because that water was under FEMA's control for months before local officials learned of it, and by the time they took some of it, they learned, not surprisingly, that a good bit of it had gone bad left out in tropical conditions for seven months.

From the article I cited:

Quote:
FEMA handles getting the supplies to the state or commonwealth, who in turn handle distributing those items at a local level, said Jeff Byard, FEMA Associate Administrator for Response and Recovery. "Obviously with Maria, we had not a supply issue, we had distribution issues," he said during a briefing about Hurricane Florence. Ottmar Chavez, now administrator of Puerto Rico's General Services Administration, said FEMA reported that it had about 20,000 pallets of bottled water in excess in May this year, before Chavez was appointed. His agency claimed the water, intending to deliver it where it was needed.

But after about 700 pallets had been distributed, complaints began to come in about the water's foul smell and taste, Chavez said in a statement. "In light of this, we have been in contact with FEMA and the Department of Health to test the water inventory received by the federal agency. We are going to return those waters," he said. The mayor of Ceiba, Angel Cruz Ramos, told CNN he's grateful for the generosity, but believes that too much water was delivered at the wrong time. "The time and heat has made it bad," he added.


Could that water have been used earlier? Of course. Over half the island didn't have enough water to drink.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/nat ... 06efc0fe2d


You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 1:42 pm 
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BackInTex wrote:
silverscreenselect wrote:
BackInTex wrote:

Who is responsible for that? Not Trump. Not the federal government.


Actually in this case Yes, the federal government, because that water was under FEMA's control for months before local officials learned of it, and by the time they took some of it, they learned, not surprisingly, that a good bit of it had gone bad left out in tropical conditions for seven months.

From the article I cited:

Quote:
FEMA handles getting the supplies to the state or commonwealth, who in turn handle distributing those items at a local level, said Jeff Byard, FEMA Associate Administrator for Response and Recovery. "Obviously with Maria, we had not a supply issue, we had distribution issues," he said during a briefing about Hurricane Florence. Ottmar Chavez, now administrator of Puerto Rico's General Services Administration, said FEMA reported that it had about 20,000 pallets of bottled water in excess in May this year, before Chavez was appointed. His agency claimed the water, intending to deliver it where it was needed.

But after about 700 pallets had been distributed, complaints began to come in about the water's foul smell and taste, Chavez said in a statement. "In light of this, we have been in contact with FEMA and the Department of Health to test the water inventory received by the federal agency. We are going to return those waters," he said. The mayor of Ceiba, Angel Cruz Ramos, told CNN he's grateful for the generosity, but believes that too much water was delivered at the wrong time. "The time and heat has made it bad," he added.


Could that water have been used earlier? Of course. Over half the island didn't have enough water to drink.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/nat ... 06efc0fe2d


You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink.

You can lead a trumpster to water, but you can't make him think.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:29 pm 
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BackInTex wrote:
You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink.


And if you lock the water away in the barn, the horse is going to get mighty thirsty.

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