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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2019 1:25 pm 
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franktangredi wrote:
44. Though he preferred writing poetry, this author’s greatest success came from his 24 novellas, including an epic 1979 trilogy set in Montana.


JIM HARRISON

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2019 3:42 pm 
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franktangredi wrote:
99. She starred in film adaptation of works by – among others – Lillian Hellman, Agatha Christie, Kaufman and Hart, Edith Wharton, and W. Somerset Maugham.


BETTE DAVIS

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2019 4:37 pm 
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I AM SO LATE!!!

4. Almost forty years after his conviction, this influential entertainer became the first person to receive a posthumous pardon from the governor of New York.

LENNY BRUCE

13. She did not receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame until 2018 – ninety years after her film debut and forty years after her longtime leading man received his.

MYRNA LOY?

MINNIE MOUSE

15. His first successful play was inspired by a news story about a conspiracy between an aeronautical company and several U.S. Army inspectors.

ARTHUR MILLER. The play is All My Sons

18. In 1933, this actress essayed a role that would later be played by Margaret O’Brien and Claire Danes.

JEAN PARKER

28. He is the only person to have served as director of both the FBI and the CIA.

WILLIAM WEBSTER??

35. With an amateur record of 85-0 and a professional record of 128-1-2, it is no surprise that, in 2002, Ring magazine ranked him the greatest boxer of the previous eighty years.

SUGAR RAY ROBINSON

36. This French fashion designer – who spent 30 years with the House of Dior – designed the wedding dresses of Queen Silvia of Sweden and Princess Caroline of Monaco.

MARC BOHAN?

37. In a 1927 comedy, he starred opposite – and fell in love with – an actress whom he would marry ten years later, after she divorced her film star husband.

BUDDY ROGERS

66. He made four films opposite the most popular singing star at 20th Century Fox, but most of us remember him best for defending a beloved icon.

JOHN PAYNE

94. As president of the Western Federation of Miners, he led his union through the Colorado Labor Wars and survived a bullet in the back.

CHARLES MOYER


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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2019 5:56 pm 
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30. His memorial plaque is located on the grounds of the Flamingo in Las Vegas, between the pool and the wedding chapel.

ELVIS PRESLEY

Mr K said this should be a question mark ….

How about BUGSY SIEGEL??


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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2019 6:25 pm 
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littlebeast13 wrote:
16. The final album of this singer was released on his 69th birthday – two days before his death – and is generally regarded as a conscious farewell to his fans.

DAVID BOWIE? GLEN CAMPBELL?

Just to add another name to this list, when I first read through these questions, the name that popped into my head was Warren Zevon. Someone needs to page TBone to this game...
Of the 3, I'd say Bowie. Campbell was already in his 80s when he passed and I think Zevon was around his mid-50s when he did.

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2019 8:08 pm 
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Estonut wrote:
littlebeast13 wrote:
16. The final album of this singer was released on his 69th birthday – two days before his death – and is generally regarded as a conscious farewell to his fans.

DAVID BOWIE? GLEN CAMPBELL?

Just to add another name to this list, when I first read through these questions, the name that popped into my head was Warren Zevon. Someone needs to page TBone to this game...
Of the 3, I'd say Bowie. Campbell was already in his 80s when he passed and I think Zevon was around his mid-50s when he did.


I think Bowie is right …. he died around the same time as his birthday.


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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2019 1:36 am 
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34. This soul singer’s only Top Forty hit was a 1977 lament about the problems of having a wife at home and a woman on the side.

BILLY PAUL

I'm pretty sure this is one of the wrong answers. "Me And Mrs. Jones" came out in 1972.


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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2019 7:38 am 
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franktangredi wrote:
61. He was the first U.S. Chief Justice to have previously served as U.S. Attorney General.

JOHN MARSHALL?


This is not John Marshall, who was never Attorney General. HARLAN FISK STONE fits the clue, but I'm not sure if he was the first former AG to serve as Chief Justice.

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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2019 8:16 am 
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A Non E. Muss wrote:
34. This soul singer’s only Top Forty hit was a 1977 lament about the problems of having a wife at home and a woman on the side.

BILLY PAUL

I'm pretty sure this is one of the wrong answers. "Me And Mrs. Jones" came out in 1972.



This is WILLIAM BELL, with a song that despite hitting #10 has never crossed my ears before...



lb13

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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2019 9:05 am 
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56. He had the shortest reign of any emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.
CALIGULA

84. Seventh on MLB’s all-time strikeout list, this pitcher did not get into the Hall of Fame until his fifth year of eligibility.
DON SUTTON

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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2019 9:33 am 
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littlebeast13 wrote:
A Non E. Muss wrote:
34. This soul singer’s only Top Forty hit was a 1977 lament about the problems of having a wife at home and a woman on the side.

BILLY PAUL

I'm pretty sure this is one of the wrong answers. "Me And Mrs. Jones" came out in 1972.



This is WILLIAM BELL, with a song that despite hitting #10 has never crossed my ears before...



lb13


Me either, and I listened to a LOT of radio in the 70s.

Sorry about the wrong definite. 5 years doesn't seem like that much difference any more...

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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2019 12:03 pm 
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mrkelley23 wrote:
littlebeast13 wrote:
A Non E. Muss wrote:
34. This soul singer’s only Top Forty hit was a 1977 lament about the problems of having a wife at home and a woman on the side.

BILLY PAUL

I'm pretty sure this is one of the wrong answers. "Me And Mrs. Jones" came out in 1972.



This is WILLIAM BELL, with a song that despite hitting #10 has never crossed my ears before...


lb13


Me either, and I listened to a LOT of radio in the 70s.

Sorry about the wrong definite. 5 years doesn't seem like that much difference any more...



I would have been sure it was Billy Paul as well. The question just seemed written for "Me and Mrs. Jones"...

lb13

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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2019 7:24 pm 
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New consolidation. I tried to incorporate all the posts since the last consolidation, and looked up a few things to confirm. As I did so, I altered Frank's numbers about right and wrong answers on the fly. They may not be correct, though, so Frank, if you have any input, please let us know. I do think there are still 3 wrong definites out there, but I don't have any more time to play with this tonight.

There are 3 'definite' answers here that are wrong.

Of those with a single answer with a question mark, 3 are right and 9 are wrong.

Of those with alternate answers, 4 include the right answer and 0 (including the one where I made the mistake) do not.

mrkelley23 wrote:
Lotta Question marks. Whole lotta question marks.

Game #190: A Very Simple Name Game

Identify the 100 people in the clues below. Then, match them into 50 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself.

There should be no alternate matches.

1. The earliest words attributed to him are “How is it that you sought me?”

JESUS (of Nazareth)

2. This scientist discovered the concept of radioactive half-life, as well as the element radon.

ERNEST RUTHERFORD? KARL ROENTGEN?

3. He holds the record for the most hits by any third baseman in MLB history.

GEORGE BRETT

4. Almost forty years after his conviction, this influential entertainer became the first person to receive a posthumous pardon from the governor of New York.

LENNY BRUCE

5. In 1521, his staunch defense of papal supremacy and the seven sacraments earned him the title “Defender of the Faith” by Pope Leo X.

HENRY VIII

6. Describing himself in an 1871 poem, he wrote, “His mind is concrete and fastidious/His nose is remarkably big/His visage is more or less hideous/His beard it resembles a wig.”

EDWARD LEAR

7. DJMQ: The company he founded arose out of short-lived artists’ colony whose residents also included fellow dancer Paul Taylor and artist Robert Rauschenberg.
Alas, there are no more DJMQs in this quiz.

8. This pioneer of television journalism– who, barring the Tangredi curse, will turn ninety this fall – was ranked #34 on a TV Guide list of the 50 Greatest TV Stars of All Time.

BARBARA WALTERS

9. The completion of the Great Northern Railway helped earn this Canadian-born magnate the title “Empire Builder.”

10. His list of accolades includes 13 Grammy awards, 10 CMA awards, 7 American Music aw
ards, the Gershwin Prize from the Library of Congress, and the Kennedy Center Honors.

GEORGE STRAIT?

11. Before launching his successful NFL career, he was the first wide receiver to win the Heisman Trophy,

JOHNNY RODGERS? TIM BROWN?

12. His famous retort in a 1988 debate was not an ad lib: he was fully prepared for his opponent to open the door for him.

LLOYD BENTSEN

13. She did not receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame until 2018 – ninety years after her film debut and forty years after her longtime leading man received his.

MINNIE MOUSE

14. In 2014, an untitled painting by this abstract expressionist sold for $11.9 million – the highest price ever paid up to that time for a work by a female artist.

15. His first successful play was inspired by a news story about a conspiracy between an aeronautical company and several U.S. Army inspectors.

ARTHUR MILLER

16. The final album of this singer was released on his 69th birthday – two days before his death – and is generally regarded as a conscious farewell to his fans.

DAVID BOWIE

17. A longtime contributor to Natural History magazine, this biologist is best known for propounding the theory that evolution consists of long periods of stability punctuated by swift periods of change.

STEPHEN JAY GOULD

18. In 1933, this actress essayed a role that would later be played by Margaret O’Brien and Claire Danes.

JEAN PARKER

19. He’s the realtor; his twin brother is the contractor.

DREW SCOTT

20. This First Lady died 25 years after leaving the White House, but she had good reason to make frequent visits in the interim.

BARBARA BUSH

21. This former Congressman died during a battle fought on March 6, 1836.

DAVY CROCKETT

22. In 1827, this English physician was the first to describe the symptoms of the kidney disease that now bears his name.

23. This television producer is best known for creating a late-night live musical program that ran on NBC from 1973-1981.

DON KIRSHNER

24. This blues singer and guitarist was working as a janitor in a steel mill when he scored his first major hit in 1948; more than half a century later, he received a Grammy for Lifetime Achievement.

25. He was the first aviator to fly solo around the world.

WILEY POST

26. In addition to his banking career with Kuhn, Loeb, and Co., this philanthropist also served as co- chair of the Metropolitan Opera and helped finance the restoration of the Parthenon.

27. He won the National Book Critics Circle Award twice, for his novels George Mills and Mrs. Ted Bliss.

28. He is the only person to have served as director of both the FBI and the CIA.

WILLIAM WEBSTER?

29. This hockey great played on four of the Original Six teams and remains the winningest goal tender of any player from that era.

30. His memorial plaque is located on the grounds of the Flamingo in Las Vegas, between the pool and the wedding chapel.

BUGSY SIEGEL?

31. This mathematician is best known for developing a graphic way to represent all possible relations between a finite collection of sets.

JOHN VENN

32. This merchant is credited with introducing the printing press to England.

33. This fictional character may have been inspired by a real life stone cutter who worked at a celebrated house of worship.

QUASIMODO? JUDE THE OBSCURE?

34. This soul singer’s only Top Forty hit was a 1977 lament about the problems of having a wife at home and a woman on the side.

WILLIAM BELL

35. With an amateur record of 85-0 and a professional record of 128-1-2, it is no surprise that, in 2002, Ring magazine ranked him the greatest boxer of the previous eighty years.

SUGAR RAY ROBINSON

36. This French fashion designer – who spent 30 years with the House of Dior – designed the wedding dresses of Queen Silvia of Sweden and Princess Caroline of Monaco.

MARC BOHAN?

37. In a 1927 comedy, he starred opposite – and fell in love with – an actress whom he would marry ten years later, after she divorced her film star husband.

BUDDY ROGERS

38. A villain in the eyes of some, a martyr in the eyes of others, this minor official achieved national notoriety in 2015 by refusing to comply with the law.

KIM DAVIS

39. This author is best known for a five-book trilogy that began as a BBC radio series.

DOUGLAS ADAMS

40. This British military officer was dubbed “The Butcher” for his role in a 1919 incident that resulted in the deaths of 379 people.

41. He became one of the key figures of the Industrial Revolution when he patented a device that sped up the weaving process by allowing the weft to pass through the warp threads faster and over a greater width of cloth.

JOHN KAY

42. “If anybody wants to put a tail on me,” he said in 1988, “go ahead. They'll be very bored." (They did and they weren’t.)

GARY HART

43. He is one of the busiest and most popular men on television, but Ariana Guttierez’s memories of him are probably not the happiest.

CHRIS HARDWICK?

44. Though he preferred writing poetry, this author’s greatest success came from his 24 novellas, including an epic 1979 trilogy set in Montana.

JIM HARRISON

45. This Atlanta-born singer hit Number One twice during the Sixties – first with a song the one-word title of which was the name of a girl, and then with a song the one-word title of which described how a girl made him feel. Got that?

TOMMY ROE

46. He wrote a nationally syndicated column from 1942 to 1983, and – unlike some other Broadway gossip columnists (*cough* walter winchell *cough*) – he had a reputation for scrupulous fairness and fact-checking.

ARMY ARCHERD?

47. Heir apparent to an empire, he never succeeded to the throne due to his participation in a suicide pact.

48. Nominated 17 times for the Nobel Prize (in Literature and Peace), his philosophy was centered on the distinction between the ‘I-Thou’ relationship and the ‘I-It’ relationship.

MARTIN BUBER

49. This bowler experienced the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat at the same moment – winning the 1970 Tournament of Champions, but falling to the floor when he left one pin standing for a final game score of 299.

DON JOHNSON

50. Attendees at a 1975 comic book convention cheered when Stan Lee announced that this artist – creator of many enduring characters – was returning to the company after a five year absence. (The reconciliation lasted only two years.)

JACK KIRBY

51. This longtime guard for the Chicago Bears is credited with being the first professional football player to incorporate weight training into his regimen.

52. This artist painted more than 600 portraits of Native Americans which, in the words of Baudelaire, captured “the proud and free characters of these chiefs, both their nobility and manliness."

53. This two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry could trace his ancestry back to the Mayflower. Easily.

54. This virologist shared a Nobel Prize with John Enders and Frederick Robbins for their work in cultivating polio viruses.

55. This actor, who made his Broadway debut at age seven playing the son of FDR, says that he was once turned down for a television commercial because of the nevus on his left cheek.

RICHARD THOMAS

56. He had the shortest reign of any emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

CALIGULA

57. The denomination founded in 1794 by this bishop now has more than 2.5 million members, mostly in the Americas and Africa.

WESLEY?

58. According to this British philosopher, “Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do, as well as to determine what we shall do.”

59. The plot of one of this Italian composer’s operas is set in motion when a bird filches a silver spoon.

60. This educator completes a list that also includes Florence Nightingale, General George Gordon, and Edward, Cardinal Manning.

61. He was the first U.S. Chief Justice to have previously served as U.S. Attorney General.

HARLAN FISK STONE?

62. In an age when there was no clear line between science and mysticism, he served as court astrologer to Elizabeth I, but was also a respected authority on mathematics, astronomy, and navigation.

63. This Norwegian is the only alpine skier to win eight Olympic medals – half of them gold – as well as five world championships.

INGEMAR STENMARK?

64. In 1790, this merchant captain completed the first American circumnavigation of the world.

65. He published only one novel in his lifetime, but it won the National Book Award and was later ranked by Modern Library as the 19th best English language novel of the 20th century.

THORNTON WILDER

66. He made four films opposite the most popular singing star at 20th Century Fox, but most of us remember him best for defending a beloved icon.

JOHN PAYNE

67. This British clergyman’s essay “An Enquiry into the Obligations of Christians to Use Means for the Conversion of the Heathens” led to the formation of the Baptist Missionary Society.

68. One of the last of the bushrangers, he was hanged in 1880 at the age of 25.

NED KELLY?

69. This British author wrote a number of successful stage comedies as well as a classic detective novel – and was not pleased to be remembered primarily for his children’s books.

A. A. MILNE

70. He was one of the first American singers to perform reggae in Jamaica, so it seems fitting that his biggest U.S. hit was later covered by Jimmy Cliff.

JOHNNY NASH

71. He was born in 1978 in the kitchen of Mamma Leoni’s Italian restaurant – an experience that had a lifelong impact on his dietary preferences.

GARFIELD

72. The Gestapo reportedly considered her the most dangerous of all American spies during World War II.

73. The model of operations he implemented as White House Chief of Staff is still followed today – but that’s not what people most remember him for.

ALEXANDER HAIG

74. In a 1961 movie, this actor played a person in one of the preceding clues.

JEFFREY HUNTER

75. The 1981 British Open was this American golfer’s only Majors win.

BILL ROGERS

76. He was the only Austrian architect to win the Pritzker Prize.

WALTER GROPIUS

77. He and his cousin Manny published their first novel under their celebrated pseudonym in 1929, but he was sole founding editor of the influential magazine that bore their name.

FREDERIC DANNAY

78. This lyricist gave us such memorable rhymes as “chat so/palazzo,” “Astaire/Camembert,” and (my personal favorite) “heinous/Coriolanus.”

COLE PORTER

79. A co-founder of Fairchild Seminconductor, this physicist designed the first integrated circuit made of silicon.

80. He was the first bridegroom to say “I do” in the Rose Garden of the White House.

EDWARD COX

81. This actor’s daughter won an Oscar three years after he received his only Oscar nomination.

RYAN O’NEAL?

82. In his ship Dainty, this English seaman and privateer carries out raids on Spanish overseas possessions, most notably Valparaiso.

CAPTAIN BLOOD?

83. She was the named plaintiff in a celebrated court case in which the named defendant was the District Attorney of Dallas County.

JANE ROE

84. Seventh on MLB’s all-time strikeout list, this pitcher did not get into the Hall of Fame until his fifth year of eligibility.

DON SUTTON

85. In 2012, the Culinary Institute of America renamed its Escoffier Restaurant to honor this French master of nouvelle cuisine.

86. This American made minor news when he defected to the Soviet Union – and much bigger news four years later. (He should have stayed in Russia.)

LEE HARVEY OSWALD

87. This Welsh musician was a founding member of the American band whose 1967 debut album has been acclaimed by Rolling Stone as "the most prophetic rock album ever made."

88. In his rookie year, he was a teammate of Bill Russell; in his final year, he was a teammate of Larry Bird – making him the only person to have played with both.

JOHN HAVLICEK? DAVE COWENS?

89. This Midwesterner was the first openly gay person elected to the United States Senate.

TAMMY BALDWIN

90. This Japanese engineer shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in developing a method of mass spectrometric analyses of biological macromolecules. (And no, I don’t have any clue what that means.)

91. A friend of Chaucer, this English poet is best remembered for a collection of short narrative poems the title of which translates into English as ‘A Lover’s Confession.’

92. He has said of a former bandmate that “for those who believe that Brian walks on water, I will always be the Antichrist.”

93. This Canadian-born broadcast journalist won Emmy awards for his coverage of the Tiananmen Square massacre and the Romanian revolution, but got saddled with his nickname for his coverage of a later conflict.

ARTHUR KENT

94. As president of the Western Federation of Miners, he led his union through the Colorado Labor Wars and survived a bullet in the back.

CHARLES MOYER

95. When this entrepreneur was named Person of the Year by Time magazine, the runners up included Julian Assange, Hamid Karzai, and the Tea Party.

MARK ZUCKERBERG

96. Although he did not originate the doctrine of “sola fide,” he did the most to articulate and spread it.

JOHN CALVIN?

97. This scientist’s first table of relative atomic weights consisted of only six elements: hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus.

DMITRI MENDELEEV?

98. As a member of Congress, he proposed what became the most recent amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

JAMES MADISON?

99. She starred in film adaptation of works by – among others – Lillian Hellman, Agatha Christie, Kaufman and Hart, Edith Wharton, and W. Somerset Maugham.

BETTE DAVIS

100. Alfred North Whitehead famously stated that “the safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to” this thinker.

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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2019 7:42 pm 
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mrkelley23 wrote:


27. He won the National Book Critics Circle Award twice, for his novels George Mills and Mrs. Ted Bliss.


How soon we forget. I thought this was a trick question and that Mrs. Ted Bliss would be the actual name of a character who would be identified as the title of the book like The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. But nope, they are the actual names of novels by STANLEY ELKIN, who I had heard of but never read any of his books.

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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2019 7:59 pm 
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23. This television producer is best known for creating a late-night live musical program that ran on NBC from 1973-1981.

DON KIRSHNER


Damnation! I just checked the airdates of Don Kirshner's Rock Concert, and they are the exact same airdates as the show I had in mind!


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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2019 8:10 pm 
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Aside from Don Kirshner, three other definite answers are wrong. One may be ambiguous, but I'm going to let that work itself out.

Of those with a single question mark, six are right and nine are wrong.

Of the ones with two suggested answers, three include the correct answer and one does not.

You have enough correct answers to complete fourteen matches.

mrkelley23 wrote:
New consolidation. I tried to incorporate all the posts since the last consolidation, and looked up a few things to confirm. As I did so, I altered Frank's numbers about right and wrong answers on the fly. They may not be correct, though, so Frank, if you have any input, please let us know. I do think there are still 3 wrong definites out there, but I don't have any more time to play with this tonight.

There are 3 'definite' answers here that are wrong.

Of those with a single answer with a question mark, 3 are right and 9 are wrong.

Of those with alternate answers, 4 include the right answer and 0 (including the one where I made the mistake) do not.

mrkelley23 wrote:
Lotta Question marks. Whole lotta question marks.

Game #190: A Very Simple Name Game

Identify the 100 people in the clues below. Then, match them into 50 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself.

There should be no alternate matches.

1. The earliest words attributed to him are “How is it that you sought me?”

JESUS (of Nazareth)

2. This scientist discovered the concept of radioactive half-life, as well as the element radon.

ERNEST RUTHERFORD? KARL ROENTGEN?

3. He holds the record for the most hits by any third baseman in MLB history.

GEORGE BRETT

4. Almost forty years after his conviction, this influential entertainer became the first person to receive a posthumous pardon from the governor of New York.

LENNY BRUCE

5. In 1521, his staunch defense of papal supremacy and the seven sacraments earned him the title “Defender of the Faith” by Pope Leo X.

HENRY VIII

6. Describing himself in an 1871 poem, he wrote, “His mind is concrete and fastidious/His nose is remarkably big/His visage is more or less hideous/His beard it resembles a wig.”

EDWARD LEAR

7. DJMQ: The company he founded arose out of short-lived artists’ colony whose residents also included fellow dancer Paul Taylor and artist Robert Rauschenberg.
Alas, there are no more DJMQs in this quiz.

8. This pioneer of television journalism– who, barring the Tangredi curse, will turn ninety this fall – was ranked #34 on a TV Guide list of the 50 Greatest TV Stars of All Time.

BARBARA WALTERS

9. The completion of the Great Northern Railway helped earn this Canadian-born magnate the title “Empire Builder.”

10. His list of accolades includes 13 Grammy awards, 10 CMA awards, 7 American Music aw
ards, the Gershwin Prize from the Library of Congress, and the Kennedy Center Honors.

GEORGE STRAIT?

11. Before launching his successful NFL career, he was the first wide receiver to win the Heisman Trophy,

JOHNNY RODGERS? TIM BROWN?

12. His famous retort in a 1988 debate was not an ad lib: he was fully prepared for his opponent to open the door for him.

LLOYD BENTSEN

13. She did not receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame until 2018 – ninety years after her film debut and forty years after her longtime leading man received his.

MINNIE MOUSE

14. In 2014, an untitled painting by this abstract expressionist sold for $11.9 million – the highest price ever paid up to that time for a work by a female artist.

15. His first successful play was inspired by a news story about a conspiracy between an aeronautical company and several U.S. Army inspectors.

ARTHUR MILLER

16. The final album of this singer was released on his 69th birthday – two days before his death – and is generally regarded as a conscious farewell to his fans.

DAVID BOWIE

17. A longtime contributor to Natural History magazine, this biologist is best known for propounding the theory that evolution consists of long periods of stability punctuated by swift periods of change.

STEPHEN JAY GOULD

18. In 1933, this actress essayed a role that would later be played by Margaret O’Brien and Claire Danes.

JEAN PARKER

19. He’s the realtor; his twin brother is the contractor.

DREW SCOTT

20. This First Lady died 25 years after leaving the White House, but she had good reason to make frequent visits in the interim.

BARBARA BUSH

21. This former Congressman died during a battle fought on March 6, 1836.

DAVY CROCKETT

22. In 1827, this English physician was the first to describe the symptoms of the kidney disease that now bears his name.

23. This television producer is best known for creating a late-night live musical program that ran on NBC from 1973-1981.

DON KIRSHNER

24. This blues singer and guitarist was working as a janitor in a steel mill when he scored his first major hit in 1948; more than half a century later, he received a Grammy for Lifetime Achievement.

25. He was the first aviator to fly solo around the world.

WILEY POST

26. In addition to his banking career with Kuhn, Loeb, and Co., this philanthropist also served as co- chair of the Metropolitan Opera and helped finance the restoration of the Parthenon.

27. He won the National Book Critics Circle Award twice, for his novels George Mills and Mrs. Ted Bliss.

28. He is the only person to have served as director of both the FBI and the CIA.

WILLIAM WEBSTER?

29. This hockey great played on four of the Original Six teams and remains the winningest goal tender of any player from that era.

30. His memorial plaque is located on the grounds of the Flamingo in Las Vegas, between the pool and the wedding chapel.

BUGSY SIEGEL?

31. This mathematician is best known for developing a graphic way to represent all possible relations between a finite collection of sets.

JOHN VENN

32. This merchant is credited with introducing the printing press to England.

33. This fictional character may have been inspired by a real life stone cutter who worked at a celebrated house of worship.

QUASIMODO? JUDE THE OBSCURE?

34. This soul singer’s only Top Forty hit was a 1977 lament about the problems of having a wife at home and a woman on the side.

WILLIAM BELL

35. With an amateur record of 85-0 and a professional record of 128-1-2, it is no surprise that, in 2002, Ring magazine ranked him the greatest boxer of the previous eighty years.

SUGAR RAY ROBINSON

36. This French fashion designer – who spent 30 years with the House of Dior – designed the wedding dresses of Queen Silvia of Sweden and Princess Caroline of Monaco.

MARC BOHAN?

37. In a 1927 comedy, he starred opposite – and fell in love with – an actress whom he would marry ten years later, after she divorced her film star husband.

BUDDY ROGERS

38. A villain in the eyes of some, a martyr in the eyes of others, this minor official achieved national notoriety in 2015 by refusing to comply with the law.

KIM DAVIS

39. This author is best known for a five-book trilogy that began as a BBC radio series.

DOUGLAS ADAMS

40. This British military officer was dubbed “The Butcher” for his role in a 1919 incident that resulted in the deaths of 379 people.

41. He became one of the key figures of the Industrial Revolution when he patented a device that sped up the weaving process by allowing the weft to pass through the warp threads faster and over a greater width of cloth.

JOHN KAY

42. “If anybody wants to put a tail on me,” he said in 1988, “go ahead. They'll be very bored." (They did and they weren’t.)

GARY HART

43. He is one of the busiest and most popular men on television, but Ariana Guttierez’s memories of him are probably not the happiest.

CHRIS HARDWICK?

44. Though he preferred writing poetry, this author’s greatest success came from his 24 novellas, including an epic 1979 trilogy set in Montana.

JIM HARRISON

45. This Atlanta-born singer hit Number One twice during the Sixties – first with a song the one-word title of which was the name of a girl, and then with a song the one-word title of which described how a girl made him feel. Got that?

TOMMY ROE

46. He wrote a nationally syndicated column from 1942 to 1983, and – unlike some other Broadway gossip columnists (*cough* walter winchell *cough*) – he had a reputation for scrupulous fairness and fact-checking.

ARMY ARCHERD?

47. Heir apparent to an empire, he never succeeded to the throne due to his participation in a suicide pact.

48. Nominated 17 times for the Nobel Prize (in Literature and Peace), his philosophy was centered on the distinction between the ‘I-Thou’ relationship and the ‘I-It’ relationship.

MARTIN BUBER

49. This bowler experienced the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat at the same moment – winning the 1970 Tournament of Champions, but falling to the floor when he left one pin standing for a final game score of 299.

DON JOHNSON

50. Attendees at a 1975 comic book convention cheered when Stan Lee announced that this artist – creator of many enduring characters – was returning to the company after a five year absence. (The reconciliation lasted only two years.)

JACK KIRBY

51. This longtime guard for the Chicago Bears is credited with being the first professional football player to incorporate weight training into his regimen.

52. This artist painted more than 600 portraits of Native Americans which, in the words of Baudelaire, captured “the proud and free characters of these chiefs, both their nobility and manliness."

53. This two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry could trace his ancestry back to the Mayflower. Easily.

54. This virologist shared a Nobel Prize with John Enders and Frederick Robbins for their work in cultivating polio viruses.

55. This actor, who made his Broadway debut at age seven playing the son of FDR, says that he was once turned down for a television commercial because of the nevus on his left cheek.

RICHARD THOMAS

56. He had the shortest reign of any emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

CALIGULA

57. The denomination founded in 1794 by this bishop now has more than 2.5 million members, mostly in the Americas and Africa.

WESLEY?

58. According to this British philosopher, “Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do, as well as to determine what we shall do.”

59. The plot of one of this Italian composer’s operas is set in motion when a bird filches a silver spoon.

60. This educator completes a list that also includes Florence Nightingale, General George Gordon, and Edward, Cardinal Manning.

61. He was the first U.S. Chief Justice to have previously served as U.S. Attorney General.

HARLAN FISK STONE?

62. In an age when there was no clear line between science and mysticism, he served as court astrologer to Elizabeth I, but was also a respected authority on mathematics, astronomy, and navigation.

63. This Norwegian is the only alpine skier to win eight Olympic medals – half of them gold – as well as five world championships.

INGEMAR STENMARK?

64. In 1790, this merchant captain completed the first American circumnavigation of the world.

65. He published only one novel in his lifetime, but it won the National Book Award and was later ranked by Modern Library as the 19th best English language novel of the 20th century.

THORNTON WILDER

66. He made four films opposite the most popular singing star at 20th Century Fox, but most of us remember him best for defending a beloved icon.

JOHN PAYNE

67. This British clergyman’s essay “An Enquiry into the Obligations of Christians to Use Means for the Conversion of the Heathens” led to the formation of the Baptist Missionary Society.

68. One of the last of the bushrangers, he was hanged in 1880 at the age of 25.

NED KELLY?

69. This British author wrote a number of successful stage comedies as well as a classic detective novel – and was not pleased to be remembered primarily for his children’s books.

A. A. MILNE

70. He was one of the first American singers to perform reggae in Jamaica, so it seems fitting that his biggest U.S. hit was later covered by Jimmy Cliff.

JOHNNY NASH

71. He was born in 1978 in the kitchen of Mamma Leoni’s Italian restaurant – an experience that had a lifelong impact on his dietary preferences.

GARFIELD

72. The Gestapo reportedly considered her the most dangerous of all American spies during World War II.

73. The model of operations he implemented as White House Chief of Staff is still followed today – but that’s not what people most remember him for.

ALEXANDER HAIG

74. In a 1961 movie, this actor played a person in one of the preceding clues.

JEFFREY HUNTER

75. The 1981 British Open was this American golfer’s only Majors win.

BILL ROGERS

76. He was the only Austrian architect to win the Pritzker Prize.

WALTER GROPIUS

77. He and his cousin Manny published their first novel under their celebrated pseudonym in 1929, but he was sole founding editor of the influential magazine that bore their name.

FREDERIC DANNAY

78. This lyricist gave us such memorable rhymes as “chat so/palazzo,” “Astaire/Camembert,” and (my personal favorite) “heinous/Coriolanus.”

COLE PORTER

79. A co-founder of Fairchild Seminconductor, this physicist designed the first integrated circuit made of silicon.

80. He was the first bridegroom to say “I do” in the Rose Garden of the White House.

EDWARD COX

81. This actor’s daughter won an Oscar three years after he received his only Oscar nomination.

RYAN O’NEAL?

82. In his ship Dainty, this English seaman and privateer carries out raids on Spanish overseas possessions, most notably Valparaiso.

CAPTAIN BLOOD?

83. She was the named plaintiff in a celebrated court case in which the named defendant was the District Attorney of Dallas County.

JANE ROE

84. Seventh on MLB’s all-time strikeout list, this pitcher did not get into the Hall of Fame until his fifth year of eligibility.

DON SUTTON

85. In 2012, the Culinary Institute of America renamed its Escoffier Restaurant to honor this French master of nouvelle cuisine.

86. This American made minor news when he defected to the Soviet Union – and much bigger news four years later. (He should have stayed in Russia.)

LEE HARVEY OSWALD

87. This Welsh musician was a founding member of the American band whose 1967 debut album has been acclaimed by Rolling Stone as "the most prophetic rock album ever made."

88. In his rookie year, he was a teammate of Bill Russell; in his final year, he was a teammate of Larry Bird – making him the only person to have played with both.

JOHN HAVLICEK? DAVE COWENS?

89. This Midwesterner was the first openly gay person elected to the United States Senate.

TAMMY BALDWIN

90. This Japanese engineer shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in developing a method of mass spectrometric analyses of biological macromolecules. (And no, I don’t have any clue what that means.)

91. A friend of Chaucer, this English poet is best remembered for a collection of short narrative poems the title of which translates into English as ‘A Lover’s Confession.’

92. He has said of a former bandmate that “for those who believe that Brian walks on water, I will always be the Antichrist.”

93. This Canadian-born broadcast journalist won Emmy awards for his coverage of the Tiananmen Square massacre and the Romanian revolution, but got saddled with his nickname for his coverage of a later conflict.

ARTHUR KENT

94. As president of the Western Federation of Miners, he led his union through the Colorado Labor Wars and survived a bullet in the back.

CHARLES MOYER

95. When this entrepreneur was named Person of the Year by Time magazine, the runners up included Julian Assange, Hamid Karzai, and the Tea Party.

MARK ZUCKERBERG

96. Although he did not originate the doctrine of “sola fide,” he did the most to articulate and spread it.

JOHN CALVIN?

97. This scientist’s first table of relative atomic weights consisted of only six elements: hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus.

DMITRI MENDELEEV?

98. As a member of Congress, he proposed what became the most recent amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

JAMES MADISON?

99. She starred in film adaptation of works by – among others – Lillian Hellman, Agatha Christie, Kaufman and Hart, Edith Wharton, and W. Somerset Maugham.

BETTE DAVIS

100. Alfred North Whitehead famously stated that “the safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to” this thinker.


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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2019 8:43 pm 
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This is one of the incorrect guesses..

10. His list of accolades includes 13 Grammy awards, 10 CMA awards, 7 American Music aw
ards, the Gershwin Prize from the Library of Congress, and the Kennedy Center Honors.

GEORGE STRAIT?

It is WILLIE NELSON

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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2019 9:45 pm 
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23. This television producer is best known for creating a late-night live musical program that ran on NBC from 1973-1981.

DON KIRSHNER



"Don Kirshner's Rock Concert" was syndicated, this clue refers to "Midnight Special", so the answer is Burt Sugarman.


24. This blues singer and guitarist was working as a janitor in a steel mill when he scored his first major hit in 1948; more than half a century later, he received a Grammy for Lifetime Achievement.


This may be John Lee Hooker


87. This Welsh musician was a founding member of the American band whose 1967 debut album has been acclaimed by Rolling Stone as "the most prophetic rock album ever made."



The group was The Velvet Underground. Lou Reed was American, so it's JOHN CALE


92. He has said of a former bandmate that “for those who believe that Brian walks on water, I will always be the Antichrist.”



Mike Love. For the record, I don't think Love is the Antichrist...just a flaming asshole who could never deal with his cousin's musical genius far eclipsing his own marginal talents. His uncle, Brian, Dennis and Carl's father, was also jealous of his son's gifts.

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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2019 6:32 am 
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Since I gave the answer, I checked on it and Thornton Wilder is definitely wrong. Someone else suggested Ralph Ellison which makes more sense.

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26. In addition to his banking career with Kuhn, Loeb, and Co., this philanthropist also served as co- chair of the Metropolitan Opera and helped finance the restoration of the Parthenon.

I believe this is OTTO KAHN

46. He wrote a nationally syndicated column from 1942 to 1983, and – unlike some other Broadway gossip columnists (*cough* walter winchell *cough*) – he had a reputation for scrupulous fairness and fact-checking.

ARMY ARCHERD?

How about EARL WILSON? I know he had been a regular newspaper guy, so the fact-checking would make sense.

53. This two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry could trace his ancestry back to the Mayflower. Easily.

Pretty sure this is ROBERT LOWELL

57. The denomination founded in 1794 by this bishop now has more than 2.5 million members, mostly in the Americas and Africa.

How about RICHARD ALLEN, who founded the AME Church in Philadelphia, which stemmed from the Free Africa Society.

59. The plot of one of this Italian composer’s operas is set in motion when a bird filches a silver spoon.

GIOACHINO ROSSINI. The Thieving Magpie

60. This educator completes a list that also includes Florence Nightingale, General George Gordon, and Edward, Cardinal Manning.

I knew I knew this …. it's Eminent Victorians.

THOMAS ARNOLD

63. This Norwegian is the only alpine skier to win eight Olympic medals – half of them gold – as well as five world championships.

INGEMAR STENMARK

KJETIL ANDRE AAMODT


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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2019 7:51 pm 
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Everything that's been added since the last consolidation is correct.


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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 9:25 am 
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mrkelley23 wrote:
40. This British military officer was dubbed “The Butcher” for his role in a 1919 incident that resulted in the deaths of 379 people.

82. In his ship Dainty, this English seaman and privateer carries out raids on Spanish overseas possessions, most notably Valparaiso.

CAPTAIN BLOOD?


Trying to kickstart this again, with some admitted external research:

40. REGINALD DYER

82. RICHARD HAWKINS

Not seeing much in the way of "simple" combinations.

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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 9:30 am 
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mellytu74 wrote:
63. This Norwegian is the only alpine skier to win eight Olympic medals – half of them gold – as well as five world championships.

INGEMAR STENMARK

KJETIL ANDRE AAMODT


A name like this just begs for an anagram. But usually in Frank's anagram puzzles there's an associated word list to cut down on duplicate answers.

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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 12:54 pm 
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silverscreenselect wrote:
mellytu74 wrote:
63. This Norwegian is the only alpine skier to win eight Olympic medals – half of them gold – as well as five world championships.

INGEMAR STENMARK

KJETIL ANDRE AAMODT


A name like this just begs for an anagram. But usually in Frank's anagram puzzles there's an associated word list to cut down on duplicate answers.


That was my thought. And, like Mr K, I didn't see any "simple" answers.

I did briefly play with the idea of Shirley Ellis's The Name Game but I haven't had time to play with that.

Shirley! Shirley, Shirley
Bo-ber-ley, bo-na-na fanna
Fo-fer-ley. fee fi mo-mer-ley, Shirley!

Lincoln! Lincoln, Lincoln. bo-bin-coln
Bo-na-na fanna, fo-fin-coln
Fee fi mo-min-coln, Lincoln!

BUT, Kjetil ?


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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 1:18 pm 
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mellytu74 wrote:
silverscreenselect wrote:
mellytu74 wrote:
63. This Norwegian is the only alpine skier to win eight Olympic medals – half of them gold – as well as five world championships.

INGEMAR STENMARK

KJETIL ANDRE AAMODT


A name like this just begs for an anagram. But usually in Frank's anagram puzzles there's an associated word list to cut down on duplicate answers.


That was my thought. And, like Mr K, I didn't see any "simple" answers.


When the 'a-ha' moment comes, you will see how simple it all is. And SSS made a very astute observation.


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