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PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2019 12:57 pm 
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Appa23 wrote:
80. This playwright co-founded a Massachusetts theatre company that galvanized native American drama – and launched the career of a four-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize. (She would later win a Pulitzer Prize of her own.)

The 4-time winner is Eugene O'Neill. Not sure who founded the theatre company.


Could this be SUSAN GLASPELL, of Providencetown?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2019 1:03 pm 
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Appa23 wrote:
Julius Erving is not right, as he was a rookie with the Virginia Squires.



70. During his rookie year, he set a Nets record for most points scored in a single season.
JULIUS ERVING

How about BERNARD KING?? I always forget he started out as a Net.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2019 3:45 pm 
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Estonut wrote:
74. His bold action in destroying a captured American ship made him a national hero – and helped him become the youngest man ever to achieve the rank of captain in the U.S. Navy.
DECATUR - Don't recall his first name, but I looked him up a long time ago when I wondered why so many places were named Decatur.


I believe that his first name was STEPHEN.

Side note: For a long time Decatur, Illiniois had a minor-league baseball team called, unsurprisingly, the Commodores. They were perhaps better known by their nickname, though, which pretty much fell out of favor not long after this logo was popularized. (And yes, I have this shirt...)

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:45 am 
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jarnon wrote:
5. This director’s masterpieces were a silent film that depicts events leading to the protagonist being burned alive – and a sound film that depicts events leading to the protagonist being burned alive.


I actually found this one out on Quora this morning when someone answered a question about directors working with actors and they mentioned the classic silent version of Joan of Arc by CARL THEODOR DREYER. A bit of research revealed that one of his most acclaimed sound movies was Day of Wrath in which a character was burned at the stake for being a witch.

Maybe this will kickstart this puzzle again. I'll try to look at it some more later. I still think Kam Fong is the key... it's got to have something to do with names

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2019 9:24 am 
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I think when all the questions are answered, the solution (if not all the correct matches) will leap to your eye.

Incidentally, I recently saw Day of Wrath on TCM and it's wonderful. And when I watched the bonus tracks on the DVD of Babette's Feast, the Danish director talked about how fortunate he was to be able to cast several actors who had worked with Dreyer. I've wanted to get him into a game for a long time.

silverscreenselect wrote:
jarnon wrote:
5. This director’s masterpieces were a silent film that depicts events leading to the protagonist being burned alive – and a sound film that depicts events leading to the protagonist being burned alive.


I actually found this one out on Quora this morning when someone answered a question about directors working with actors and they mentioned the classic silent version of Joan of Arc by CARL THEODOR DREYER. A bit of research revealed that one of his most acclaimed sound movies was Day of Wrath in which a character was burned at the stake for being a witch.

Maybe this will kickstart this puzzle again. I'll try to look at it some more later. I still think Kam Fong is the key... it's got to have something to do with names


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2019 9:54 pm 
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Updated consolidation… Did a little bit of confirming, and added Howard Unruh as the mass murderer in 24 and Kate Upton as the model -- the clue does not specify whether it was her first cover, and the 2017 cover was pretty special (and spectacular, IMHO). Also added Mr. Bennet as the Pride and Prejudice character in 52. Doing that made me wonder if we were looking for Democratic presidential candidates, but Pete Buttigieg would be a hard get for Frank, methinks.

Identify the 100 people in the clues below. Then, match them into 50 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself.

There will undoubtedly be alternate matches, but only one solution will allow you to use each name once.

1. He was the only Founding Father to sign the Declaration of Independence, the Treaty of Paris, and the Constitution.
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

2. WHITNEY HOUSTON

3. In an influential 1651 work, this philosopher wrote, “The only way to build a common power is to entrust the power and strength to one man, or Assembly that would reduce all their wills, by majority rule in a single will.”
THOMAS HOBBES

4. This scientist has said that almost all of the technology involved in his great innovation already existed by 1989 and that he “just had to put them together.”
TIM BERNERS LEE

5. This director’s masterpieces were a silent film that depicts events leading to the protagonist being burned alive – and a sound film that depicts events leading to the protagonist being burned alive.
CARL THEODOR DREYER

6. He was a 42-1 underdog in the fight that made him undisputed champion of the world.
BUSTER DOUGLAS

7. The stanzaic form invented, and named for, this poet consists of eight lines in iambic pentameter followed by a single line in iambic hexameter, with the rhyme scheme ABABBCBCC.
EDMUND SPENSER

8. DJMQ: After this dancer-choreographer broke with the Denishawn company, she began to develop her own technique based on the principle of “fall and recovery.”
Another DJMQ appears at #57.
DORIS HUMPHREY

9. A major artistic movement got its name from this artist’s 1874 painting of a port at sunrise.
CLAUDE MONET

10. His leadership and genius for public relations helped make the union he cofounded in 1962 the recognized bargaining agent for more than 50,000 workers.
CESAR CHAVEZ

11. This aviator and explorer is the only person to have received three tickertape parades in New York City.
RICHARD BYRD

12. When this entrepreneur arrived in Texas in 1919, he intended to purchase a bank, but got sidetracked into buying a different kind of establishment instead – and an empire was born.
CONRAD HILTON

13. This Union general is best known for suffering a humiliating defeat to a force half the size of his own in 1863. (His more popular claim to fame is probably a myth.)
JOSEPH HOOKER

14. Her guilt over driving her gay husband to suicide played a major role in her descent into madness. (Her brother-in-law didn’t make things any better.)

15. Along with his two colleagues, this New Zealand scientist won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing polymers material that conduct electricity.

16. This British veteran of the Kosovo War only had one hit in the U.S. – but it went all the way to #1 on the Pop, Adult, and Adult Contemporary charts.
JAMES BLUNT

17. In 1868, this Congressman became the third person to lay in state in the Capitol rotunda; his honor guard consisting entirely of African American soldiers.
THADDEUS STEVENS? WILLIAM SUMNER?

18. She received a Tony award and an Oscar nomination for her role as a stenographer who suffers an unexpected – and hilarious - pregnancy.
PEGGY CASS

19. Truman Capote famously said of this novelist’s seminal work - and the method by which he produced it - “That’s not writing, it’s typing.”
JACK KEROUAC

20. The eye injury that prematurely ended the career of this NHL Hall of Famer led many goalies to switch from fiberglass face masks to the cage-and-helmet variety.
BERNIE PARENT

21. Among his nicknames were “American Moses” and the “Lion of the Lord.”
BRIGHAM YOUNG

22. This Nobel Prize-winning economist crossed over into sociology with his studies of such topics as criminal law and racial discrimination, and was one of the founders of what became known as the New Home Economics.
GARY BECKER

23. The year after she appeared on the cover of a popular magazine, this model married a man who had made many appearances on the cover of the same magazine.
KATE UPTON

24. This mass murderer died in a mental hospital sixty years after his infamous “Walk of Death” left 13 people dead in 21 minutes.
HOWARD UNRUH

25. Subjects of this pioneering portrait photographer – whose studio was a converted chicken coop – included Charles Darwin, Ellen Terry, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.

26. This activist has served as Chief Executive of a highly influential – and highly controversial – national organization since 1991.
WAYNE LaPIERRE

27. This organic chemist committed suicide at the age of 41, and thus never became aware of the lasting importance of his own work.
WALLACE CARROTHERS

28. As a result of covert operations in Chile, he became the only CIA director ever convicted of misleading Congress.
RICHARD HELMS

29. One of the premier interpreters of the Great American Songbook, this singer and pianist married his longtime partner in 2008 – in a ceremony presided over by Judge Judy.
MICHAEL FEINSTEIN? BARRY MANILOW?

30. She was the first American woman to win an Olympic gold medal in downhill skiing.
LINDSAY VONN

31. Her silent film career included roles that would later be replayed in the talkies by Norma Shearer and Greta Garbo; her talkie career consisted of only two movies, after which she retired with a buttload of money and never looked back.
NORMA TALMADGE

32. This playwright helped introduce the flashback and expressionism to the American stage, but his Pulitzer Prize came for a work that was the epitome of stage realism.

33. He has a master’s degree in Divinity and a doctorate in clinical psychology, but he is best known as an Internet Yenta.

34. His most famous broadcast during his 35 years with CBS was anchoring the live coverage of the Challenger – signing off, then immediately signing on again.

35. This would-be terrorist got caught in the act on December 22, 2001 – and has slowed the rest of us down ever since.
RICHARD REID

36. She was the only female character in a very popular comic strip from its debut on October 2, 1950 until the introduction of a second girl four months later.
PATTY (She had a last name assigned at one point, but I don’t think it’s canon)

37. His cogent aphorism on the reason for studying history is probably better remembered today than any of his philosophical works, such as his seminal 1896 study of aesthetics.
GEORGE SANTAYANA

38. This influential American historian stirred considerable controversy with his 1913 book that expounded the thesis that the structure of the U.S. Constitution was based on the economic interests of the Founding Fathers.
CHARLES BEARD

39. This singer’s first single was the only country song to debut at #1 on the U.S. pop charts.
CARRIE UNDERWOOD

40. He served as an officer in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution, but his greatest impact came with his leading role in the settlement of the Northwest Territory.
GEORGE ROGERS CLARK

41. In 1842, he became the first surgeon to use ether as an anesthetic.
CRAWFORD LONG

42. He had been king of England for just over nine months when he died in a famous battle.
HAROLD GODWINSON

43. WILKIE COLLINS

44. As far as I’ve been able to determine, this Hall of Fame tackle was the first player to amass three Super Bowl rings.

45. In 1985, this newspaper cartoonist introduced a titular character named after someone who is the answer to one of the preceding clues.
BILL WATTERSON

46. The health company that this entrepreneur and her husband began in the 1980s is now part of Nestle’s Nutrition.
JENNY CRAIG

47. This actor’s sixteen years with the Honolulu police department certainly prepared him for his best known role.
KAM FONG

48. This Kentucky plantation owner - who freed his slaves and started an antislavery newspaper – not only survived an assassination attempt but, with the bullet still in his chest, attacked the gunman and purportedly cut out his eyes with a Bowie knife. (No passive resister he.)

49. This carpenter on a popular home makeover show was named one of the sexiest men on television by People magazine.
CARTER OOSTERHOUSE (As far as I can tell, Pennington never received said honor from People, but Oosterhouse did)

50. This philosopher’s most famous principle is often misinterpreted as advocating simplicity, but he was actually arguing that, when presented with competing hypotheses that yield the same prediction, one should select the one with the fewest assumptions.
WILLIAM OCCAM (I believe this is also spelled Ockham sometimes)

51. The punch card system that he patented in 1889 is one of the milestones in the development of automatic data processing.
HERMAN HOLLERITH

52. This gentleman “was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three and twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character.”
MR. BENNET (apparently his first name is never mentioned in P&P. Interesting)

53. In 1936, she became Time magazine’s first woman of the year, even though she hadn’t actually done much herself.
WALLIS SIMPSON

54. NELLIE ROSS

55. In a 1952 Downbeat readers’ poll, he finished second to Charlie Parker in the category of Best Alto Saxophonist.

56. His grim 1899 novel about an unlicensed dentist is perhaps the best example of naturalism in American fiction.
FRANK NORRIS

57. DJMQ: Until her retirement at the age of 50, this Canadian dancer was prima ballerina with the New York City Ballet.
MELISSA HAYDEN

58. Her onscreen husbands have included Gene Hackman, John Lithgow, Alan Arkin, and the director of the movie for which she won her first Oscar.
DIANNE WIEST

59. BOB MATHIAS

60. As a result of some controversial statements about Islam, the Pentagon rescinded this evangelist’s invitation to speak at a 2010 National Day of Prayer. (He attended anyway.)

61. As an Egyptologist, she became the first woman ever to unwrap a mummy – but it was her anthropological studies on folklore that earned her the nickname “Grandmother of Wicca.”

62. This suffragist cofounded the National Woman’s Party with her friend Alice Paul.
LUCY BURNS

63. A prominent muckraker with McClure’s magazine, this journalist also won a Pulitzer for his biography of an American President.
RAY STANNARD BROWN

64. In 1844, this neoclassicist became the first American sculptor to exhibit a life-size statue of a fully nude female figure.

65. Although this Nobel Prize-winning physicist first developed his method of three-dimensional imaging in 1947, it didn’t become practical until the invention of the laser.

66. He was overthrown in 1971, regained power in 1980 when the man who overthrew him was overthrown, was overthrown again in 1985, died in exile twenty years later, and (surprisingly) was brought back to his own country for a state funeral.
MILTON OBOTE? PINOCHET?

67. A member of the American Classical Music Hall of Fame, this minimalist composer has also received three Oscar nominations and a Golden Globe.
PHILLIP GLASS

68. Before launching his very successful career as a director of feature films, he earned six Emmy nominations as a writer on The Larry Sanders Show.
JUDD APATOW?

69. One of the biggest literary feuds of the 20th century finally exploded in a lawsuit based on a remark this novelist made to Dick Cavett about a notable playwright.
NORMAN MAILER

70. During his rookie year, he set a Nets record for most points scored in a single season.
BERNARD KING?

71. This entrepreneur opened the first of his franchise restaurants in South Salt Lake, Utah, in 1952.
COLONEL HARLAND SANDERS

72. In 1690, this philosopher wrote, “Men being, as has been said, by nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent.”
JOHN LOCKE

73. A movie about the political education of this Boy Ranger was a major hit of Hollywood’s greatest year and made a major star of the actor who played him.
JEFFERSON SMITH

74. His bold action in destroying a captured American ship made him a national hero – and helped him become the youngest man ever to achieve the rank of captain in the U.S. Navy.
STEPHEN DECATUR

75. Like Coco Chanel, this French fashion designer won renown for an iconic little black dress, worn in a 1961 film.
HUBERT GIVENCHY

76. First recipient of the Pritzker Prize, this architect’s notable designs included his own Connecticut residence, inspired by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House.

77. The death of his five year-old son in 1977 almost caused this rock singer to leave the music industry – partly out of grief, partly out of resentment that two of his three bandmates did not attend the funeral.
ROBERT PLANT

78. Americans can make folk heroes out of terrorists – or at least, they did in the case of this war criminal turned bank robber.
JESSE JAMES

79. With the White House still under reconstruction, this First Lady hosted her first inaugural ball at her private residence on I Street.
ELIZABETH MONROE

80. This playwright co-founded a Massachusetts theatre company that galvanized native American drama – and launched the career of a four-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize. (She would later win a Pulitzer Prize of her own.)
SUSAN GLASPELL

81. In 1950, this activist – whose partners included an American character actor and an Austrian fashion designer – founded one of the first gay rights groups in the United States.
HARRY HAY

82. The death of his wife – and the fact that he never found out she was ill until after she was buried – spurred this painter to explore new means of rapid communication.
SAMUEL MORSE

83. His famous reluctance to engage in oral questioning has been attributed to self-consciousness about his speaking style, but he will sometimes pass a note along to one of his colleagues.
CLARENCE THOMAS

84. As host of a popular 1950s kiddie show – and composer of its iconic theme song – he was always the last to introduce himself.
JIMMIE DODD

85. A member of the PBA Hall of Fame, he introduced the “cranker” style of delivery and was the first bowler to convert a 7-10 split on national television.
MARK ROTH

86. During World War I, the test developed by this American psychologist was administered to 1.7 million American soldiers.
ROBERT YERKES

87. Although he appeared in only a single 1930 novel and four short stories, he is one of the most influential and best remembered of all the Great Detectives in fiction.
SAM SPADE

88. Little is known about this Apostle, although his title seems to identify him with a revolutionary political movement.
SIMON THE ZEALOT

89. As of June 2019, this Internet entrepreneur is ranked by Forbes magazine as the twelfth richest person in the world – three spots ahead of his longtime business partner.
LARRY PAGE? SERGEY BRIN?

90. Although he was a maître d’hotel rather than a chef, he is credited with creating a popular salad made with celery, apples, walnuts, and grapes.
OSCAR TSCHIRKY

91. Co-founder of a major African American political organization, he was murdered by a member of a far more radical African American organization.
MALCOLM X

92. This American physician led the team that confirmed the theories of Cuban epidemiologist Carlos Juan Finlay.
WALTER REED

93. Oh, Jeff...I Love You, Too...But... has been described as this artist’s Mona Lisa.
ROY LIECHTENSTEIN

94. One of my favorite songs by this lyricist includes this delightful triple rhyme: “Sir Paul was frail, he looked a wreck to me/At night he was a horse’s neck to me/So I performed an appendectomy.”
LORENZ HART

95. He completes the following list: Jack Albertson, Anne Bancroft, Shirley Booth, Yul Brynner, Jose Ferrer, Joel Grey, Lila Kedrova, Paul Scofield.
REX HARRISON

96. He completes the following list: Henry Arnold, Dwight Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, George Marshall.
OMAR BRADLEY

97. This navigator sailed into the river that now bears his name in 1609, and an even larger body of water that now bears his name the following year.
HENRY HUDSON

98. In his 1966 Hall of Fame induction speech, this baseball legend prophetically said, “I hope someday Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson will be voted into the Hall of Fame as symbols of the great Negro players who are not here only because they weren’t given the chance.”
TED WILLIAMS

99. This poet’s ashes are interred in a Harlem center for research into black culture, under an inscription that reads, "My soul has grown deep like the rivers.”
LANGSTON HUGHES

100. He served four terms in the state legislature and one term in the U.S. Congress – and that was the sum total of his experience in elective office before becoming President more than a decade later.
ABRAHAM LINCOLN

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 3:45 am 
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48. This Kentucky plantation owner - who freed his slaves and started an antislavery newspaper – not only survived an assassination attempt but, with the bullet still in his chest, attacked the gunman and purportedly cut out his eyes with a Bowie knife. (No passive resister he.)
CASSIUS CLAY (whose namesake was the boxer)

60. As a result of some controversial statements about Islam, the Pentagon rescinded this evangelist’s invitation to speak at a 2010 National Day of Prayer. (He attended anyway.)
This was BILLY GRAHAM's son, but I don't remember his first name.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 7:23 am 
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mrkelley23 wrote:
Updated consolidation… Did a little bit of confirming, and added Howard Unruh as the mass murderer in 24 and Kate Upton as the model -- the clue does not specify whether it was her first cover, and the 2017 cover was pretty special (and spectacular, IMHO).


This, then, is my fault. I should have specified that it was her only cover. Sorry for a bad question. I should have realized how many athletes marry models - because they can. As an added clue, the husband in question is a baseball player.

Aside from that one, four other definite answers are not what I had in mind. #86 is my fault; it didn't occur to me that there might be two correct answers to that question. #40 is ambiguous, but I would contend that he doesn't fulfill the whole clue. The other two definitely fulfill part of the clue but not all of it. Also, one answer is right but the last name is wrong, which may or may not matter.

The answers with question marks are right. The ones with alternative answers all contain the correct answer.

I think there are one or two pairs that might unlock this thing as it stands, although SSS must still look in vain for his Kam Fong match.


Quote:
Identify the 100 people in the clues below. Then, match them into 50 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself.

There will undoubtedly be alternate matches, but only one solution will allow you to use each name once.

1. He was the only Founding Father to sign the Declaration of Independence, the Treaty of Paris, and the Constitution.
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

2. WHITNEY HOUSTON

3. In an influential 1651 work, this philosopher wrote, “The only way to build a common power is to entrust the power and strength to one man, or Assembly that would reduce all their wills, by majority rule in a single will.”
THOMAS HOBBES

4. This scientist has said that almost all of the technology involved in his great innovation already existed by 1989 and that he “just had to put them together.”
TIM BERNERS LEE

5. This director’s masterpieces were a silent film that depicts events leading to the protagonist being burned alive – and a sound film that depicts events leading to the protagonist being burned alive.
CARL THEODOR DREYER

6. He was a 42-1 underdog in the fight that made him undisputed champion of the world.
BUSTER DOUGLAS

7. The stanzaic form invented, and named for, this poet consists of eight lines in iambic pentameter followed by a single line in iambic hexameter, with the rhyme scheme ABABBCBCC.
EDMUND SPENSER

8. DJMQ: After this dancer-choreographer broke with the Denishawn company, she began to develop her own technique based on the principle of “fall and recovery.”
Another DJMQ appears at #57.
DORIS HUMPHREY

9. A major artistic movement got its name from this artist’s 1874 painting of a port at sunrise.
CLAUDE MONET

10. His leadership and genius for public relations helped make the union he cofounded in 1962 the recognized bargaining agent for more than 50,000 workers.
CESAR CHAVEZ

11. This aviator and explorer is the only person to have received three tickertape parades in New York City.
RICHARD BYRD

12. When this entrepreneur arrived in Texas in 1919, he intended to purchase a bank, but got sidetracked into buying a different kind of establishment instead – and an empire was born.
CONRAD HILTON

13. This Union general is best known for suffering a humiliating defeat to a force half the size of his own in 1863. (His more popular claim to fame is probably a myth.)
JOSEPH HOOKER

14. Her guilt over driving her gay husband to suicide played a major role in her descent into madness. (Her brother-in-law didn’t make things any better.)

15. Along with his two colleagues, this New Zealand scientist won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing polymers material that conduct electricity.

16. This British veteran of the Kosovo War only had one hit in the U.S. – but it went all the way to #1 on the Pop, Adult, and Adult Contemporary charts.
JAMES BLUNT

17. In 1868, this Congressman became the third person to lay in state in the Capitol rotunda; his honor guard consisting entirely of African American soldiers.
THADDEUS STEVENS? WILLIAM SUMNER?

18. She received a Tony award and an Oscar nomination for her role as a stenographer who suffers an unexpected – and hilarious - pregnancy.
PEGGY CASS

19. Truman Capote famously said of this novelist’s seminal work - and the method by which he produced it - “That’s not writing, it’s typing.”
JACK KEROUAC

20. The eye injury that prematurely ended the career of this NHL Hall of Famer led many goalies to switch from fiberglass face masks to the cage-and-helmet variety.
BERNIE PARENT

21. Among his nicknames were “American Moses” and the “Lion of the Lord.”
BRIGHAM YOUNG

22. This Nobel Prize-winning economist crossed over into sociology with his studies of such topics as criminal law and racial discrimination, and was one of the founders of what became known as the New Home Economics.
GARY BECKER

23. The year after she appeared on the cover of a popular magazine, this model married a man who had made many appearances on the cover of the same magazine.
KATE UPTON

24. This mass murderer died in a mental hospital sixty years after his infamous “Walk of Death” left 13 people dead in 21 minutes.
HOWARD UNRUH

25. Subjects of this pioneering portrait photographer – whose studio was a converted chicken coop – included Charles Darwin, Ellen Terry, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.

26. This activist has served as Chief Executive of a highly influential – and highly controversial – national organization since 1991.
WAYNE LaPIERRE

27. This organic chemist committed suicide at the age of 41, and thus never became aware of the lasting importance of his own work.
WALLACE CARROTHERS

28. As a result of covert operations in Chile, he became the only CIA director ever convicted of misleading Congress.
RICHARD HELMS

29. One of the premier interpreters of the Great American Songbook, this singer and pianist married his longtime partner in 2008 – in a ceremony presided over by Judge Judy.
MICHAEL FEINSTEIN? BARRY MANILOW?

30. She was the first American woman to win an Olympic gold medal in downhill skiing.
LINDSAY VONN

31. Her silent film career included roles that would later be replayed in the talkies by Norma Shearer and Greta Garbo; her talkie career consisted of only two movies, after which she retired with a buttload of money and never looked back.
NORMA TALMADGE

32. This playwright helped introduce the flashback and expressionism to the American stage, but his Pulitzer Prize came for a work that was the epitome of stage realism.

33. He has a master’s degree in Divinity and a doctorate in clinical psychology, but he is best known as an Internet Yenta.

34. His most famous broadcast during his 35 years with CBS was anchoring the live coverage of the Challenger – signing off, then immediately signing on again.

35. This would-be terrorist got caught in the act on December 22, 2001 – and has slowed the rest of us down ever since.
RICHARD REID

36. She was the only female character in a very popular comic strip from its debut on October 2, 1950 until the introduction of a second girl four months later.
PATTY (She had a last name assigned at one point, but I don’t think it’s canon)

37. His cogent aphorism on the reason for studying history is probably better remembered today than any of his philosophical works, such as his seminal 1896 study of aesthetics.
GEORGE SANTAYANA

38. This influential American historian stirred considerable controversy with his 1913 book that expounded the thesis that the structure of the U.S. Constitution was based on the economic interests of the Founding Fathers.
CHARLES BEARD

39. This singer’s first single was the only country song to debut at #1 on the U.S. pop charts.
CARRIE UNDERWOOD

40. He served as an officer in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution, but his greatest impact came with his leading role in the settlement of the Northwest Territory.
GEORGE ROGERS CLARK

41. In 1842, he became the first surgeon to use ether as an anesthetic.
CRAWFORD LONG

42. He had been king of England for just over nine months when he died in a famous battle.
HAROLD GODWINSON

43. WILKIE COLLINS

44. As far as I’ve been able to determine, this Hall of Fame tackle was the first player to amass three Super Bowl rings.

45. In 1985, this newspaper cartoonist introduced a titular character named after someone who is the answer to one of the preceding clues.
BILL WATTERSON

46. The health company that this entrepreneur and her husband began in the 1980s is now part of Nestle’s Nutrition.
JENNY CRAIG

47. This actor’s sixteen years with the Honolulu police department certainly prepared him for his best known role.
KAM FONG

48. This Kentucky plantation owner - who freed his slaves and started an antislavery newspaper – not only survived an assassination attempt but, with the bullet still in his chest, attacked the gunman and purportedly cut out his eyes with a Bowie knife. (No passive resister he.)

49. This carpenter on a popular home makeover show was named one of the sexiest men on television by People magazine.
CARTER OOSTERHOUSE (As far as I can tell, Pennington never received said honor from People, but Oosterhouse did)

50. This philosopher’s most famous principle is often misinterpreted as advocating simplicity, but he was actually arguing that, when presented with competing hypotheses that yield the same prediction, one should select the one with the fewest assumptions.
WILLIAM OCCAM (I believe this is also spelled Ockham sometimes)

51. The punch card system that he patented in 1889 is one of the milestones in the development of automatic data processing.
HERMAN HOLLERITH

52. This gentleman “was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three and twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character.”
MR. BENNET (apparently his first name is never mentioned in P&P. Interesting)

53. In 1936, she became Time magazine’s first woman of the year, even though she hadn’t actually done much herself.
WALLIS SIMPSON

54. NELLIE ROSS

55. In a 1952 Downbeat readers’ poll, he finished second to Charlie Parker in the category of Best Alto Saxophonist.

56. His grim 1899 novel about an unlicensed dentist is perhaps the best example of naturalism in American fiction.
FRANK NORRIS

57. DJMQ: Until her retirement at the age of 50, this Canadian dancer was prima ballerina with the New York City Ballet.
MELISSA HAYDEN

58. Her onscreen husbands have included Gene Hackman, John Lithgow, Alan Arkin, and the director of the movie for which she won her first Oscar.
DIANNE WIEST

59. BOB MATHIAS

60. As a result of some controversial statements about Islam, the Pentagon rescinded this evangelist’s invitation to speak at a 2010 National Day of Prayer. (He attended anyway.)

61. As an Egyptologist, she became the first woman ever to unwrap a mummy – but it was her anthropological studies on folklore that earned her the nickname “Grandmother of Wicca.”

62. This suffragist cofounded the National Woman’s Party with her friend Alice Paul.
LUCY BURNS

63. A prominent muckraker with McClure’s magazine, this journalist also won a Pulitzer for his biography of an American President.
RAY STANNARD BROWN

64. In 1844, this neoclassicist became the first American sculptor to exhibit a life-size statue of a fully nude female figure.

65. Although this Nobel Prize-winning physicist first developed his method of three-dimensional imaging in 1947, it didn’t become practical until the invention of the laser.

66. He was overthrown in 1971, regained power in 1980 when the man who overthrew him was overthrown, was overthrown again in 1985, died in exile twenty years later, and (surprisingly) was brought back to his own country for a state funeral.
MILTON OBOTE? PINOCHET?

67. A member of the American Classical Music Hall of Fame, this minimalist composer has also received three Oscar nominations and a Golden Globe.
PHILLIP GLASS

68. Before launching his very successful career as a director of feature films, he earned six Emmy nominations as a writer on The Larry Sanders Show.
JUDD APATOW?

69. One of the biggest literary feuds of the 20th century finally exploded in a lawsuit based on a remark this novelist made to Dick Cavett about a notable playwright.
NORMAN MAILER

70. During his rookie year, he set a Nets record for most points scored in a single season.
BERNARD KING?

71. This entrepreneur opened the first of his franchise restaurants in South Salt Lake, Utah, in 1952.
COLONEL HARLAND SANDERS

72. In 1690, this philosopher wrote, “Men being, as has been said, by nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent.”
JOHN LOCKE

73. A movie about the political education of this Boy Ranger was a major hit of Hollywood’s greatest year and made a major star of the actor who played him.
JEFFERSON SMITH

74. His bold action in destroying a captured American ship made him a national hero – and helped him become the youngest man ever to achieve the rank of captain in the U.S. Navy.
STEPHEN DECATUR

75. Like Coco Chanel, this French fashion designer won renown for an iconic little black dress, worn in a 1961 film.
HUBERT GIVENCHY

76. First recipient of the Pritzker Prize, this architect’s notable designs included his own Connecticut residence, inspired by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House.

77. The death of his five year-old son in 1977 almost caused this rock singer to leave the music industry – partly out of grief, partly out of resentment that two of his three bandmates did not attend the funeral.
ROBERT PLANT

78. Americans can make folk heroes out of terrorists – or at least, they did in the case of this war criminal turned bank robber.
JESSE JAMES

79. With the White House still under reconstruction, this First Lady hosted her first inaugural ball at her private residence on I Street.
ELIZABETH MONROE

80. This playwright co-founded a Massachusetts theatre company that galvanized native American drama – and launched the career of a four-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize. (She would later win a Pulitzer Prize of her own.)
SUSAN GLASPELL

81. In 1950, this activist – whose partners included an American character actor and an Austrian fashion designer – founded one of the first gay rights groups in the United States.
HARRY HAY

82. The death of his wife – and the fact that he never found out she was ill until after she was buried – spurred this painter to explore new means of rapid communication.
SAMUEL MORSE

83. His famous reluctance to engage in oral questioning has been attributed to self-consciousness about his speaking style, but he will sometimes pass a note along to one of his colleagues.
CLARENCE THOMAS

84. As host of a popular 1950s kiddie show – and composer of its iconic theme song – he was always the last to introduce himself.
JIMMIE DODD

85. A member of the PBA Hall of Fame, he introduced the “cranker” style of delivery and was the first bowler to convert a 7-10 split on national television.
MARK ROTH

86. During World War I, the test developed by this American psychologist was administered to 1.7 million American soldiers.
ROBERT YERKES

87. Although he appeared in only a single 1930 novel and four short stories, he is one of the most influential and best remembered of all the Great Detectives in fiction.
SAM SPADE

88. Little is known about this Apostle, although his title seems to identify him with a revolutionary political movement.
SIMON THE ZEALOT

89. As of June 2019, this Internet entrepreneur is ranked by Forbes magazine as the twelfth richest person in the world – three spots ahead of his longtime business partner.
LARRY PAGE? SERGEY BRIN?

90. Although he was a maître d’hotel rather than a chef, he is credited with creating a popular salad made with celery, apples, walnuts, and grapes.
OSCAR TSCHIRKY

91. Co-founder of a major African American political organization, he was murdered by a member of a far more radical African American organization.
MALCOLM X

92. This American physician led the team that confirmed the theories of Cuban epidemiologist Carlos Juan Finlay.
WALTER REED

93. Oh, Jeff...I Love You, Too...But... has been described as this artist’s Mona Lisa.
ROY LIECHTENSTEIN

94. One of my favorite songs by this lyricist includes this delightful triple rhyme: “Sir Paul was frail, he looked a wreck to me/At night he was a horse’s neck to me/So I performed an appendectomy.”
LORENZ HART

95. He completes the following list: Jack Albertson, Anne Bancroft, Shirley Booth, Yul Brynner, Jose Ferrer, Joel Grey, Lila Kedrova, Paul Scofield.
REX HARRISON

96. He completes the following list: Henry Arnold, Dwight Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, George Marshall.
OMAR BRADLEY

97. This navigator sailed into the river that now bears his name in 1609, and an even larger body of water that now bears his name the following year.
HENRY HUDSON

98. In his 1966 Hall of Fame induction speech, this baseball legend prophetically said, “I hope someday Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson will be voted into the Hall of Fame as symbols of the great Negro players who are not here only because they weren’t given the chance.”
TED WILLIAMS

99. This poet’s ashes are interred in a Harlem center for research into black culture, under an inscription that reads, "My soul has grown deep like the rivers.”
LANGSTON HUGHES

100. He served four terms in the state legislature and one term in the U.S. Congress – and that was the sum total of his experience in elective office before becoming President more than a decade later.
ABRAHAM LINCOLN


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 3:09 pm 
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I think that we are looking for Arthur St. Clair for #40. He was the first Governor of Ohio, and an officer in both wars.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 4:56 pm 
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32. This playwright helped introduce the flashback and expressionism to the American stage, but his Pulitzer Prize came for a work that was the epitome of stage realism.

This could be ELMER RICE (The Adding Machine and the Pulitzer for Street scene).


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 9:24 pm 
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14. is BLANCHE DUBOIS

15. is ALAN MACDIARMID.

25. is JULIA MARGARET CAMERON

33. is NEIL CLARK WARREN

34. is CHRISTOPHER GLENN

44. is FORREST GREGG

55. is ART PEPPER

60. is FRANKLIN GRAHAM

61. is MARGARET MURRAY

64. is HIRAM POWERS (Hey, SSS! Lookie!)

65. is DENNIS GABOR

76. is PHILIP JOHNSON

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 9:31 pm 
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2 famous senators from each state?

9. CLAUDE Monet+ 55. Art PEPPER = Claude Pepper of Florida

79. ELIZABETH Monroe + 33. Neil Clark WARREN = Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts

68. JUDD Apatow + 44. Forrest GREGG = Judd Gregg of New Hampshire

97. HENRY Hudson + 48. Cassius CLAY = Henry Clay of Kentucky

45. BILL Watterson + 96. Omar BRADLEY = Bill Bradley of New Jersey

And SSS's match that got it started:

64. HIRAM Powers + 47. Kam FONG = Hiram Fong of Hawaii

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The real question of government versus private enterprise is argued on too philosophical and abstract a basis. Theoretically, planning may be good. But nobody has ever figured out the cause of government stupidity—and until they do (and find the cure), all ideal plans will fall into quicksand. -- Richard Feynman, "What do you Care what other People Think?"


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 10:42 pm 
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78. JESSE JAMES + 28. RICHARD HELMS = JESSE HELMS (NC)

51. HERMAN HOLLEREITH + 31. NORMA TALMADGE = HERMAN TALMADGE (GA)

12. CONRAD HILTON + 62. LUCY BURNS = CONRAD BURNS (MT)

5. CARL DREYER + 57. MELISSA HAYDEN = CARL HAYDEN (AZ)

14. BLANCHE DUBOIS + 100. ABE LINCOLN = BLANCHE LINCOLN (AR)

81. HARRY HAY + 35. RICHARD REID = HARRY REID (NV)


Well, I think I know where Frank got the inspiration for this puzzle.

BTW, one of the few questions I remember from the Art Fleming version of Jeopardy asked who was the junior senator from Arizona. Everyone drew a blank and Art said something to the effect of "you're going to hate yourselves for this." Of course, the answer was Barry Goldwater, who was very much in the news at that time (Hayden was the senior senator.)

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 10:45 pm 
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MrK, you did it again!

87. SAM Spade + 2. Whitney HOUSTON = Sam Houston of Texas

75. HUBERT Givenchy + 8. Doris HUMPHREY = Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota

77. ROBERT Plant + 11. Richard BYRD = Robert Byrd of West Virginia

20. BERNIE Parent + 71. Colonel Harland SANDERS = Bernie Sanders of Vermont

58. DIANNE Wiest + 29. Michael FEINSTEIN = Dianne Feinstein of California

30. LINDSAY Vonn + 60 Franklin GRAHAM = Lindsay Graham of South Carolina

80. SUSAN Glaspell + 43. Wilkie COLLINS = Susan Collins of Maine

38. CHARLES Beard + 59. Bob MATHIAS = Charles Mathias of Maryland

3. THOMAS Hobbes + 84. Jimmie DODD = Thomas Dodd of Connecticut

50. WILLIAM Occam + 85. Mark ROTH = William Roth of Delaware

22. GARY Becker + 94. Lorenz HART = Gary Hart of Colorado

72. JOHN Locke + 34. Christopher GLENN = John Glenn of Ohio


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 11:23 pm 
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Updated consolidation…

Identify the 100 people in the clues below. Then, match them into 50 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself.

There will undoubtedly be alternate matches, but only one solution will allow you to use each name once.

1. He was the only Founding Father to sign the Declaration of Independence, the Treaty of Paris, and the Constitution.
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

*2. WHITNEY HOUSTON
*3. THOMAS HOBBES

4. This scientist has said that almost all of the technology involved in his great innovation already existed by 1989 and that he “just had to put them together.”
TIM BERNERS LEE

*5. CARL THEODOR DREYER

6. He was a 42-1 underdog in the fight that made him undisputed champion of the world.
BUSTER DOUGLAS

7. The stanzaic form invented, and named for, this poet consists of eight lines in iambic pentameter followed by a single line in iambic hexameter, with the rhyme scheme ABABBCBCC.
EDMUND SPENSER

*8. DORIS HUMPHREY
*9. CLAUDE MONET

10. His leadership and genius for public relations helped make the union he cofounded in 1962 the recognized bargaining agent for more than 50,000 workers.
CESAR CHAVEZ

*11. RICHARD BYRD
*12. CONRAD HILTON

13. This Union general is best known for suffering a humiliating defeat to a force half the size of his own in 1863. (His more popular claim to fame is probably a myth.)
JOSEPH HOOKER

*14. BLANCHE DuBOIS

15. Along with his two colleagues, this New Zealand scientist won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing polymers material that conduct electricity.
ALAN MacDIARMID

16. This British veteran of the Kosovo War only had one hit in the U.S. – but it went all the way to #1 on the Pop, Adult, and Adult Contemporary charts.
JAMES BLUNT

17. In 1868, this Congressman became the third person to lay in state in the Capitol rotunda; his honor guard consisting entirely of African American soldiers.
THADDEUS STEVENS? WILLIAM SUMNER?

18. She received a Tony award and an Oscar nomination for her role as a stenographer who suffers an unexpected – and hilarious - pregnancy.
PEGGY CASS

19. Truman Capote famously said of this novelist’s seminal work - and the method by which he produced it - “That’s not writing, it’s typing.”
JACK KEROUAC

*20. BERNIE PARENT

21. Among his nicknames were “American Moses” and the “Lion of the Lord.”
BRIGHAM YOUNG

*22. GARY BECKER

23. The year after she appeared on the cover of a popular magazine, this model married a man who had made many appearances on the cover of the same magazine.

24. This mass murderer died in a mental hospital sixty years after his infamous “Walk of Death” left 13 people dead in 21 minutes.
HOWARD UNRUH

25. Subjects of this pioneering portrait photographer – whose studio was a converted chicken coop – included Charles Darwin, Ellen Terry, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.
JULIA MARGARET CAMERON

26. This activist has served as Chief Executive of a highly influential – and highly controversial – national organization since 1991.
WAYNE LaPIERRE

27. This organic chemist committed suicide at the age of 41, and thus never became aware of the lasting importance of his own work.
WALLACE CARROTHERS

*28. RICHARD HELMS
*29. MICHAEL FEINSTEIN
*30. LINDSAY VONN
*31. NORMA TALMADGE

32. This playwright helped introduce the flashback and expressionism to the American stage, but his Pulitzer Prize came for a work that was the epitome of stage realism.
ELMER RICE

*33. NEIL CLARK WARREN
*34. CHRISTOPHER GLENN
*35. RICHARD REID

36. She was the only female character in a very popular comic strip from its debut on October 2, 1950 until the introduction of a second girl four months later.
PATTY (She had a last name assigned at one point, but I don’t think it’s canon)

37. His cogent aphorism on the reason for studying history is probably better remembered today than any of his philosophical works, such as his seminal 1896 study of aesthetics.
GEORGE SANTAYANA

*38. CHARLES BEARD

39. This singer’s first single was the only country song to debut at #1 on the U.S. pop charts.
CARRIE UNDERWOOD

40. He served as an officer in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution, but his greatest impact came with his leading role in the settlement of the Northwest Territory.
ARTHUR ST. CLAIR

41. In 1842, he became the first surgeon to use ether as an anesthetic.
CRAWFORD LONG

42. He had been king of England for just over nine months when he died in a famous battle.
HAROLD GODWINSON

*43. WILKIE COLLINS
*44. FORREST GREGG
*45. BILL WATTERSON

46. The health company that this entrepreneur and her husband began in the 1980s is now part of Nestle’s Nutrition.
JENNY CRAIG

*47. KAM FONG
*48. CASSIUS CLAY

49. This carpenter on a popular home makeover show was named one of the sexiest men on television by People magazine.
CARTER OOSTERHOUSE (As far as I can tell, Pennington never received said honor from People, but Oosterhouse did)

*50. WILLIAM OCCAM
*51. HERMAN HOLLERITH

52. This gentleman “was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three and twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character.”
MR. BENNET (apparently his first name is never mentioned in P&P. Interesting)

53. In 1936, she became Time magazine’s first woman of the year, even though she hadn’t actually done much herself.
WALLIS SIMPSON

54. NELLIE ROSS
*55. ART PEPPER

56. His grim 1899 novel about an unlicensed dentist is perhaps the best example of naturalism in American fiction.
FRANK NORRIS

*57. MELISSA HAYDEN
*58. DIANNE WIEST
*59. BOB MATHIAS
*60. FRANKLIN GRAHAM

61. As an Egyptologist, she became the first woman ever to unwrap a mummy – but it was her anthropological studies on folklore that earned her the nickname “Grandmother of Wicca.”
MARGARET MURRAY

*62. LUCY BURNS

63. A prominent muckraker with McClure’s magazine, this journalist also won a Pulitzer for his biography of an American President.
RAY STANNARD BROWN

*64. HIRAM POWERS

65. Although this Nobel Prize-winning physicist first developed his method of three-dimensional imaging in 1947, it didn’t become practical until the invention of the laser.
DENNIS GABOR

66. He was overthrown in 1971, regained power in 1980 when the man who overthrew him was overthrown, was overthrown again in 1985, died in exile twenty years later, and (surprisingly) was brought back to his own country for a state funeral.
MILTON OBOTE? PINOCHET?

67. A member of the American Classical Music Hall of Fame, this minimalist composer has also received three Oscar nominations and a Golden Globe.
PHILLIP GLASS

*68. JUDD APATOW

69. One of the biggest literary feuds of the 20th century finally exploded in a lawsuit based on a remark this novelist made to Dick Cavett about a notable playwright.
NORMAN MAILER

70. BERNARD KING
*71. COLONEL HARLAND SANDERS
*72. JOHN LOCKE

73. A movie about the political education of this Boy Ranger was a major hit of Hollywood’s greatest year and made a major star of the actor who played him.
JEFFERSON SMITH

74. His bold action in destroying a captured American ship made him a national hero – and helped him become the youngest man ever to achieve the rank of captain in the U.S. Navy.
STEPHEN DECATUR

*75. HUBERT GIVENCHY

76. First recipient of the Pritzker Prize, this architect’s notable designs included his own Connecticut residence, inspired by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House.
PHILIP JOHNSON

*77. ROBERT PLANT
*78. JESSE JAMES
*79. ELIZABETH MONROE
*80. SUSAN GLASPELL
*81. HARRY HAY

82. The death of his wife – and the fact that he never found out she was ill until after she was buried – spurred this painter to explore new means of rapid communication.
SAMUEL MORSE

83. His famous reluctance to engage in oral questioning has been attributed to self-consciousness about his speaking style, but he will sometimes pass a note along to one of his colleagues.
CLARENCE THOMAS

*84. JIMMIE DODD
*85. MARK ROTH

86. During World War I, the test developed by this American psychologist was administered to 1.7 million American soldiers.

*87. SAM SPADE

88. Little is known about this Apostle, although his title seems to identify him with a revolutionary political movement.
SIMON THE ZEALOT

89. As of June 2019, this Internet entrepreneur is ranked by Forbes magazine as the twelfth richest person in the world – three spots ahead of his longtime business partner.
LARRY PAGE? SERGEY BRIN?

90. Although he was a maître d’hotel rather than a chef, he is credited with creating a popular salad made with celery, apples, walnuts, and grapes.
OSCAR TSCHIRKY

91. Co-founder of a major African American political organization, he was murdered by a member of a far more radical African American organization.
MALCOLM X

92. This American physician led the team that confirmed the theories of Cuban epidemiologist Carlos Juan Finlay.
WALTER REED

93. Oh, Jeff...I Love You, Too...But... has been described as this artist’s Mona Lisa.
ROY LIECHTENSTEIN

*94. LORENZ HART

95. He completes the following list: Jack Albertson, Anne Bancroft, Shirley Booth, Yul Brynner, Jose Ferrer, Joel Grey, Lila Kedrova, Paul Scofield.
REX HARRISON

*96. OMAR BRADLEY
*97. HENRY HUDSON

98. In his 1966 Hall of Fame induction speech, this baseball legend prophetically said, “I hope someday Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson will be voted into the Hall of Fame as symbols of the great Negro players who are not here only because they weren’t given the chance.”
TED WILLIAMS

99. This poet’s ashes are interred in a Harlem center for research into black culture, under an inscription that reads, "My soul has grown deep like the rivers.”
LANGSTON HUGHES

*100. ABRAHAM LINCOLN


TANGREDI:
First name + Last name = Famous senator from each state


MATCHES:

9. CLAUDE Monet + 55. Art PEPPER = Claude Pepper of Florida

79. ELIZABETH Monroe + 33. Neil Clark WARREN = Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts

68. JUDD Apatow + 44. Forrest GREGG = Judd Gregg of New Hampshire

97. HENRY Hudson + 48. Cassius CLAY = Henry Clay of Kentucky

45. BILL Watterson + 96. Omar BRADLEY = Bill Bradley of New Jersey

64. HIRAM Powers + 47. Kam FONG = Hiram Fong of Hawaii

78. JESSE James + 28. Richard HELMS = Jesse Helms of North Carolina

51. HERMAN Hollerith + 31. Norma TALMADGE = Herman Talmadge of Georgia

12. CONRAD Hilton + 62. Lucy BURNS = Conrad Burns of Montana

5. CARL Theodor Dreyer + 57. Melissa HAYDEN = Carl Hayden of Arizona

14. BLANCHE DuBois + 100. Abraham LINCOLN = Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas

81. HARRY Hay + 35. Richard REID = Harry Reid of Nevada

87. SAM Spade + 2. Whitney HOUSTON = Sam Houston of Texas

75. HUBERT Givenchy + 8. Doris HUMPHREY = Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota

77. ROBERT Plant + 11. Richard BYRD = Robert Byrd of West Virginia

20. BERNIE Parent + 71. Colonel Harland SANDERS = Bernie Sanders of Vermont

58. DIANNE Wiest + 29. Michael FEINSTEIN = Dianne Feinstein of California

30. LINDSAY Vonn + 60. Franklin GRAHAM = Lindsay Graham of South Carolina

80. SUSAN Glaspell + 43. Wilkie COLLINS = Susan Collins of Maine

38. CHARLES Beard + 59. Bob MATHIAS = Charles Mathias of Maryland

3. THOMAS Hobbes + 84. Jimmie DODD = Thomas Dodd of Connecticut

50. WILLIAM Occam + 85. Mark ROTH = William Roth of Delaware

22. GARY Becker + 94. Lorenz HART = Gary Hart of Colorado

72. JOHN Locke + 34. Christopher GLENN = John Glenn of Ohio


UNUSED STATES:

Alabama
Alaska
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Louisiana
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska
New Mexico
New York
North Dakota
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Dakota
Tennessee
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wisconsin
Wyoming


Last edited by jarnon on Sat Jul 20, 2019 11:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2019 11:33 pm 
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74. STEPHEN Decatur + 6. Buster DOUGLAS = Stephen Douglas of Illinois

93. ROY Liechtenstein + 16. James BLUNT = Roy Blunt of Missouri

1. BENJAMIN Franklin + 95. Rex HARRISON = Benjamin Harrison of Indiana

Frank never allows answers based on the title of the game, but an alternative for South Carolina is:
56. FRANK Norris + 39. Carrie UNDERWOOD = Frank Underwood


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 6:57 am 
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I think this is the first time a puzzle has been solved close to midnight on a Saturday. Good job!

#40 was apparently too ambiguous as worded. Let me add, then, that the person I want was actually known as the "Father of the Northwest Territory."

Two other answers are also still wrong, but they will probably work themselves out.


jarnon wrote:
Updated consolidation…

Identify the 100 people in the clues below. Then, match them into 50 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself.

There will undoubtedly be alternate matches, but only one solution will allow you to use each name once.

1. He was the only Founding Father to sign the Declaration of Independence, the Treaty of Paris, and the Constitution.
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

*2. WHITNEY HOUSTON
*3. THOMAS HOBBES

4. This scientist has said that almost all of the technology involved in his great innovation already existed by 1989 and that he “just had to put them together.”
TIM BERNERS LEE

*5. CARL THEODOR DREYER

6. He was a 42-1 underdog in the fight that made him undisputed champion of the world.
BUSTER DOUGLAS

7. The stanzaic form invented, and named for, this poet consists of eight lines in iambic pentameter followed by a single line in iambic hexameter, with the rhyme scheme ABABBCBCC.
EDMUND SPENSER

*8. DORIS HUMPHREY
*9. CLAUDE MONET

10. His leadership and genius for public relations helped make the union he cofounded in 1962 the recognized bargaining agent for more than 50,000 workers.
CESAR CHAVEZ

*11. RICHARD BYRD
*12. CONRAD HILTON

13. This Union general is best known for suffering a humiliating defeat to a force half the size of his own in 1863. (His more popular claim to fame is probably a myth.)
JOSEPH HOOKER

*14. BLANCHE DuBOIS

15. Along with his two colleagues, this New Zealand scientist won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing polymers material that conduct electricity.
ALAN MacDIARMID

16. This British veteran of the Kosovo War only had one hit in the U.S. – but it went all the way to #1 on the Pop, Adult, and Adult Contemporary charts.
JAMES BLUNT

17. In 1868, this Congressman became the third person to lay in state in the Capitol rotunda; his honor guard consisting entirely of African American soldiers.
THADDEUS STEVENS? WILLIAM SUMNER?

18. She received a Tony award and an Oscar nomination for her role as a stenographer who suffers an unexpected – and hilarious - pregnancy.
PEGGY CASS

19. Truman Capote famously said of this novelist’s seminal work - and the method by which he produced it - “That’s not writing, it’s typing.”
JACK KEROUAC

*20. BERNIE PARENT

21. Among his nicknames were “American Moses” and the “Lion of the Lord.”
BRIGHAM YOUNG

*22. GARY BECKER

23. The year after she appeared on the cover of a popular magazine, this model married a man who had made many appearances on the cover of the same magazine.

24. This mass murderer died in a mental hospital sixty years after his infamous “Walk of Death” left 13 people dead in 21 minutes.
HOWARD UNRUH

25. Subjects of this pioneering portrait photographer – whose studio was a converted chicken coop – included Charles Darwin, Ellen Terry, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.
JULIA MARGARET CAMERON

26. This activist has served as Chief Executive of a highly influential – and highly controversial – national organization since 1991.
WAYNE LaPIERRE

27. This organic chemist committed suicide at the age of 41, and thus never became aware of the lasting importance of his own work.
WALLACE CARROTHERS

*28. RICHARD HELMS
*29. MICHAEL FEINSTEIN
*30. LINDSAY VONN
*31. NORMA TALMADGE

32. This playwright helped introduce the flashback and expressionism to the American stage, but his Pulitzer Prize came for a work that was the epitome of stage realism.
ELMER RICE

*33. NEIL CLARK WARREN
*34. CHRISTOPHER GLENN
*35. RICHARD REID

36. She was the only female character in a very popular comic strip from its debut on October 2, 1950 until the introduction of a second girl four months later.
PATTY (She had a last name assigned at one point, but I don’t think it’s canon)

37. His cogent aphorism on the reason for studying history is probably better remembered today than any of his philosophical works, such as his seminal 1896 study of aesthetics.
GEORGE SANTAYANA

*38. CHARLES BEARD

39. This singer’s first single was the only country song to debut at #1 on the U.S. pop charts.
CARRIE UNDERWOOD

40. He served as an officer in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution, but his greatest impact came with his leading role in the settlement of the Northwest Territory.
ARTHUR ST. CLAIR

41. In 1842, he became the first surgeon to use ether as an anesthetic.
CRAWFORD LONG

42. He had been king of England for just over nine months when he died in a famous battle.
HAROLD GODWINSON

*43. WILKIE COLLINS
*44. FORREST GREGG
*45. BILL WATTERSON

46. The health company that this entrepreneur and her husband began in the 1980s is now part of Nestle’s Nutrition.
JENNY CRAIG

*47. KAM FONG
*48. CASSIUS CLAY

49. This carpenter on a popular home makeover show was named one of the sexiest men on television by People magazine.
CARTER OOSTERHOUSE (As far as I can tell, Pennington never received said honor from People, but Oosterhouse did)

*50. WILLIAM OCCAM
*51. HERMAN HOLLERITH

52. This gentleman “was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three and twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character.”
MR. BENNET (apparently his first name is never mentioned in P&P. Interesting)

53. In 1936, she became Time magazine’s first woman of the year, even though she hadn’t actually done much herself.
WALLIS SIMPSON

54. NELLIE ROSS
*55. ART PEPPER

56. His grim 1899 novel about an unlicensed dentist is perhaps the best example of naturalism in American fiction.
FRANK NORRIS

*57. MELISSA HAYDEN
*58. DIANNE WIEST
*59. BOB MATHIAS
*60. FRANKLIN GRAHAM

61. As an Egyptologist, she became the first woman ever to unwrap a mummy – but it was her anthropological studies on folklore that earned her the nickname “Grandmother of Wicca.”
MARGARET MURRAY

*62. LUCY BURNS

63. A prominent muckraker with McClure’s magazine, this journalist also won a Pulitzer for his biography of an American President.
RAY STANNARD BROWN

*64. HIRAM POWERS

65. Although this Nobel Prize-winning physicist first developed his method of three-dimensional imaging in 1947, it didn’t become practical until the invention of the laser.
DENNIS GABOR

66. He was overthrown in 1971, regained power in 1980 when the man who overthrew him was overthrown, was overthrown again in 1985, died in exile twenty years later, and (surprisingly) was brought back to his own country for a state funeral.
MILTON OBOTE? PINOCHET?

67. A member of the American Classical Music Hall of Fame, this minimalist composer has also received three Oscar nominations and a Golden Globe.
PHILLIP GLASS

*68. JUDD APATOW

69. One of the biggest literary feuds of the 20th century finally exploded in a lawsuit based on a remark this novelist made to Dick Cavett about a notable playwright.
NORMAN MAILER

70. BERNARD KING
*71. COLONEL HARLAND SANDERS
*72. JOHN LOCKE

73. A movie about the political education of this Boy Ranger was a major hit of Hollywood’s greatest year and made a major star of the actor who played him.
JEFFERSON SMITH

74. His bold action in destroying a captured American ship made him a national hero – and helped him become the youngest man ever to achieve the rank of captain in the U.S. Navy.
STEPHEN DECATUR

*75. HUBERT GIVENCHY

76. First recipient of the Pritzker Prize, this architect’s notable designs included his own Connecticut residence, inspired by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House.
PHILIP JOHNSON

*77. ROBERT PLANT
*78. JESSE JAMES
*79. ELIZABETH MONROE
*80. SUSAN GLASPELL
*81. HARRY HAY

82. The death of his wife – and the fact that he never found out she was ill until after she was buried – spurred this painter to explore new means of rapid communication.
SAMUEL MORSE

83. His famous reluctance to engage in oral questioning has been attributed to self-consciousness about his speaking style, but he will sometimes pass a note along to one of his colleagues.
CLARENCE THOMAS

*84. JIMMIE DODD
*85. MARK ROTH

86. During World War I, the test developed by this American psychologist was administered to 1.7 million American soldiers.

*87. SAM SPADE

88. Little is known about this Apostle, although his title seems to identify him with a revolutionary political movement.
SIMON THE ZEALOT

89. As of June 2019, this Internet entrepreneur is ranked by Forbes magazine as the twelfth richest person in the world – three spots ahead of his longtime business partner.
LARRY PAGE? SERGEY BRIN?

90. Although he was a maître d’hotel rather than a chef, he is credited with creating a popular salad made with celery, apples, walnuts, and grapes.
OSCAR TSCHIRKY

91. Co-founder of a major African American political organization, he was murdered by a member of a far more radical African American organization.
MALCOLM X

92. This American physician led the team that confirmed the theories of Cuban epidemiologist Carlos Juan Finlay.
WALTER REED

93. Oh, Jeff...I Love You, Too...But... has been described as this artist’s Mona Lisa.
ROY LIECHTENSTEIN

*94. LORENZ HART

95. He completes the following list: Jack Albertson, Anne Bancroft, Shirley Booth, Yul Brynner, Jose Ferrer, Joel Grey, Lila Kedrova, Paul Scofield.
REX HARRISON

*96. OMAR BRADLEY
*97. HENRY HUDSON

98. In his 1966 Hall of Fame induction speech, this baseball legend prophetically said, “I hope someday Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson will be voted into the Hall of Fame as symbols of the great Negro players who are not here only because they weren’t given the chance.”
TED WILLIAMS

99. This poet’s ashes are interred in a Harlem center for research into black culture, under an inscription that reads, "My soul has grown deep like the rivers.”
LANGSTON HUGHES

*100. ABRAHAM LINCOLN


TANGREDI:
First name + Last name = Famous senator from each state


MATCHES:

9. CLAUDE Monet + 55. Art PEPPER = Claude Pepper of Florida

79. ELIZABETH Monroe + 33. Neil Clark WARREN = Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts

68. JUDD Apatow + 44. Forrest GREGG = Judd Gregg of New Hampshire

97. HENRY Hudson + 48. Cassius CLAY = Henry Clay of Kentucky

45. BILL Watterson + 96. Omar BRADLEY = Bill Bradley of New Jersey

64. HIRAM Powers + 47. Kam FONG = Hiram Fong of Hawaii

78. JESSE James + 28. Richard HELMS = Jesse Helms of North Carolina

51. HERMAN Hollerith + 31. Norma TALMADGE = Herman Talmadge of Georgia

12. CONRAD Hilton + 62. Lucy BURNS = Conrad Burns of Montana

5. CARL Theodor Dreyer + 57. Melissa HAYDEN = Carl Hayden of Arizona

14. BLANCHE DuBois + 100. Abraham LINCOLN = Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas

81. HARRY Hay + 35. Richard REID = Harry Reid of Nevada

87. SAM Spade + 2. Whitney HOUSTON = Sam Houston of Texas

75. HUBERT Givenchy + 8. Doris HUMPHREY = Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota

77. ROBERT Plant + 11. Richard BYRD = Robert Byrd of West Virginia

20. BERNIE Parent + 71. Colonel Harland SANDERS = Bernie Sanders of Vermont

58. DIANNE Wiest + 29. Michael FEINSTEIN = Dianne Feinstein of California

30. LINDSAY Vonn + 60. Franklin GRAHAM = Lindsay Graham of South Carolina

80. SUSAN Glaspell + 43. Wilkie COLLINS = Susan Collins of Maine

38. CHARLES Beard + 59. Bob MATHIAS = Charles Mathias of Maryland

3. THOMAS Hobbes + 84. Jimmie DODD = Thomas Dodd of Connecticut

50. WILLIAM Occam + 85. Mark ROTH = William Roth of Delaware

22. GARY Becker + 94. Lorenz HART = Gary Hart of Colorado

72. JOHN Locke + 34. Christopher GLENN = John Glenn of Ohio


UNUSED STATES:

Alabama
Alaska
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Louisiana
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska
New Mexico
New York
North Dakota
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Dakota
Tennessee
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wisconsin
Wyoming


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 7:55 am 
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jarnon wrote:
Frank never allows answers based on the title of the game, but an alternative for South Carolina is:
56. FRANK Norris + 39. Carrie UNDERWOOD = Frank Underwood


Frank Underwood was never a Senator. He was the Majority Whip of the House who became Vice President and then, like Gerald Ford, became President without ever being elected by the country as a whole. Of course, unlike Ford, Underwood was directly responsible for the chain of events that led to both of his promotions.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 9:30 am 
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19. Jack Kerouac + 92. Walter Reed - Jack Reed (RI)

98. Ted Williams + 17. Thaddeus Stevens = Ted Stevens (AK)

26. Wayne LaPierre + 82. Samuel Morse = Wayne Morse (OR)

89. Larry Page + 46. Jenny Craig = Larry Craig (ID) How soon we forget.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 10:09 am 
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silverscreenselect wrote:
jarnon wrote:
Frank never allows answers based on the title of the game, but an alternative for South Carolina is:
56. FRANK Norris + 39. Carrie UNDERWOOD = Frank Underwood


Frank Underwood was never a Senator. He was the Majority Whip of the House who became Vice President and then, like Gerald Ford, became President without ever being elected by the country as a whole. Of course, unlike Ford, Underwood was directly responsible for the chain of events that led to both of his promotions.
Sorry for the error, I’ve never watched House of Cards. So Frank’s ineligible because he never was a senator, there’s already a match for S.C., and something else I can’t put my finger on right now.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 10:20 am 
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Bi-state area edition....

74. STEPHEN Decatur + 6. Buster DOUGLAS - Stephen Douglas - Illinois

93. ROY Liechtenstein + 16. James BLUNT = Roy Blunt - Missouri

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 11:59 am 
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franktangredi wrote:
Two other answers are also still wrong, but they will probably work themselves out.
I expect there's a Davis to go with Jefferson Smith, and a Russell or maybe Huey to go with Crawford Long, and a Baker to go with Howard Unruh.
franktangredi wrote:
Also, one answer is right but the last name is wrong, which may or may not matter.
This could be 52. MR. BENNET. I looked the name up, and there's a Senator Bennet from Colorado (used) and Senator Bennett from Utah (unused).

Update: The Pride and Prejudice character is definitely Mr. Bennet, so I'm befuddled.


Last edited by jarnon on Sun Jul 21, 2019 1:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 1:22 pm 
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jarnon wrote:
I expect ... there's a Russell or maybe Huey to go with Crawford Long.
Got It! 91 isn't MALCOLM X, but HUEY NEWTON.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 1:30 pm 
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Revised consolidation…

Identify the 100 people in the clues below. Then, match them into 50 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself.

There will undoubtedly be alternate matches, but only one solution will allow you to use each name once.

*1. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
*2. WHITNEY HOUSTON
*3. THOMAS HOBBES

4. This scientist has said that almost all of the technology involved in his great innovation already existed by 1989 and that he “just had to put them together.”
TIM BERNERS LEE

*5. CARL THEODOR DREYER
*6. BUSTER DOUGLAS

7. The stanzaic form invented, and named for, this poet consists of eight lines in iambic pentameter followed by a single line in iambic hexameter, with the rhyme scheme ABABBCBCC.
EDMUND SPENSER

*8. DORIS HUMPHREY
*9. CLAUDE MONET
*10. CESAR CHAVEZ
*11. RICHARD BYRD
*12. CONRAD HILTON

13. This Union general is best known for suffering a humiliating defeat to a force half the size of his own in 1863. (His more popular claim to fame is probably a myth.)
JOSEPH HOOKER

*14. BLANCHE DuBOIS
*15. ALAN MacDIARMID
*16. JAMES BLUNT
*17. THADDEUS STEVENS

18. She received a Tony award and an Oscar nomination for her role as a stenographer who suffers an unexpected – and hilarious - pregnancy.
PEGGY CASS

*19. JACK KEROUAC
*20. BERNIE PARENT

21. Among his nicknames were “American Moses” and the “Lion of the Lord.”
BRIGHAM YOUNG

*22. GARY BECKER

23. The year after she appeared on the cover of a popular magazine, this model married a man who had made many appearances on the cover of the same magazine.

24. This mass murderer died in a mental hospital sixty years after his infamous “Walk of Death” left 13 people dead in 21 minutes.
HOWARD UNRUH

25. Subjects of this pioneering portrait photographer – whose studio was a converted chicken coop – included Charles Darwin, Ellen Terry, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.
JULIA MARGARET CAMERON

*26. WAYNE LaPIERRE

27. This organic chemist committed suicide at the age of 41, and thus never became aware of the lasting importance of his own work.
WALLACE CARROTHERS

*28. RICHARD HELMS
*29. MICHAEL FEINSTEIN
*30. LINDSAY VONN
*31. NORMA TALMADGE

32. This playwright helped introduce the flashback and expressionism to the American stage, but his Pulitzer Prize came for a work that was the epitome of stage realism.
ELMER RICE

*33. NEIL CLARK WARREN
*34. CHRISTOPHER GLENN
*35. RICHARD REID
*36. PATTY

37. His cogent aphorism on the reason for studying history is probably better remembered today than any of his philosophical works, such as his seminal 1896 study of aesthetics.
GEORGE SANTAYANA

*38. CHARLES BEARD

39. This singer’s first single was the only country song to debut at #1 on the U.S. pop charts.
CARRIE UNDERWOOD

*40. RUFUS PUTNAM
*41. CRAWFORD LONG
*42. HAROLD GODWINSON
*43. WILKIE COLLINS
*44. FORREST GREGG
*45. BILL WATTERSON
*46. JENNY CRAIG
*47. KAM FONG
*48. CASSIUS CLAY

49. This carpenter on a popular home makeover show was named one of the sexiest men on television by People magazine.
CARTER OOSTERHOUSE (As far as I can tell, Pennington never received said honor from People, but Oosterhouse did)

*50. WILLIAM OCCAM
*51. HERMAN HOLLERITH

52. This gentleman “was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three and twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character.”
MR. BENNET (apparently his first name is never mentioned in P&P. Interesting)

*53. WALLIS SIMPSON
54. NELLIE ROSS
*55. ART PEPPER

56. His grim 1899 novel about an unlicensed dentist is perhaps the best example of naturalism in American fiction.
FRANK NORRIS

*57. MELISSA HAYDEN
*58. DIANNE WIEST
*59. BOB MATHIAS
*60. FRANKLIN GRAHAM
*61. MARGARET MURRAY
*62. LUCY BURNS

63. A prominent muckraker with McClure’s magazine, this journalist also won a Pulitzer for his biography of an American President.
RAY STANNARD BROWN

*64. HIRAM POWERS
*65. DENNIS GABOR

66. He was overthrown in 1971, regained power in 1980 when the man who overthrew him was overthrown, was overthrown again in 1985, died in exile twenty years later, and (surprisingly) was brought back to his own country for a state funeral.
MILTON OBOTE? PINOCHET?

67. A member of the American Classical Music Hall of Fame, this minimalist composer has also received three Oscar nominations and a Golden Globe.
PHILLIP GLASS

*68. JUDD APATOW

69. One of the biggest literary feuds of the 20th century finally exploded in a lawsuit based on a remark this novelist made to Dick Cavett about a notable playwright.
NORMAN MAILER

*70. BERNARD KING
*71. COLONEL HARLAND SANDERS
*72. JOHN LOCKE

73. A movie about the political education of this Boy Ranger was a major hit of Hollywood’s greatest year and made a major star of the actor who played him.
JEFFERSON SMITH

*74. STEPHEN DECATUR
*75. HUBERT GIVENCHY

76. First recipient of the Pritzker Prize, this architect’s notable designs included his own Connecticut residence, inspired by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House.
PHILIP JOHNSON

*77. ROBERT PLANT
*78. JESSE JAMES
*79. ELIZABETH MONROE
*80. SUSAN GLASPELL
*81. HARRY HAY
*82. SAMUEL MORSE

83. His famous reluctance to engage in oral questioning has been attributed to self-consciousness about his speaking style, but he will sometimes pass a note along to one of his colleagues.
CLARENCE THOMAS

*84. JIMMIE DODD
*85. MARK ROTH

86. During World War I, the test developed by this American psychologist was administered to 1.7 million American soldiers.

*87. SAM SPADE

88. Little is known about this Apostle, although his title seems to identify him with a revolutionary political movement.
SIMON THE ZEALOT

*89. LARRY PAGE

90. Although he was a maître d’hotel rather than a chef, he is credited with creating a popular salad made with celery, apples, walnuts, and grapes.
OSCAR TSCHIRKY

*91. HUEY NEWTON
*92. WALTER REED
*93. ROY LIECHTENSTEIN
*94. LORENZ HART
*95. REX HARRISON
*96. OMAR BRADLEY
*97. HENRY HUDSON
*98. TED WILLIAMS
*99. LANGSTON HUGHES
*100. ABRAHAM LINCOLN


TANGREDI:
First name + Last name = Famous senator from each state


MATCHES:

9. CLAUDE Monet + 55. Art PEPPER = Claude Pepper of Florida

79. ELIZABETH Monroe + 33. Neil Clark WARREN = Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts

68. JUDD Apatow + 44. Forrest GREGG = Judd Gregg of New Hampshire

97. HENRY Hudson + 48. Cassius CLAY = Henry Clay of Kentucky

45. BILL Watterson + 96. Omar BRADLEY = Bill Bradley of New Jersey

64. HIRAM Powers + 47. Kam FONG = Hiram Fong of Hawaii

78. JESSE James + 28. Richard HELMS = Jesse Helms of North Carolina

51. HERMAN Hollerith + 31. Norma TALMADGE = Herman Talmadge of Georgia

12. CONRAD Hilton + 62. Lucy BURNS = Conrad Burns of Montana

5. CARL Theodor Dreyer + 57. Melissa HAYDEN = Carl Hayden of Arizona

14. BLANCHE DuBois + 100. Abraham LINCOLN = Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas

81. HARRY Hay + 35. Richard REID = Harry Reid of Nevada

87. SAM Spade + 2. Whitney HOUSTON = Sam Houston of Texas

75. HUBERT Givenchy + 8. Doris HUMPHREY = Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota

77. ROBERT Plant + 11. Richard BYRD = Robert Byrd of West Virginia

20. BERNIE Parent + 71. Colonel Harland SANDERS = Bernie Sanders of Vermont

58. DIANNE Wiest + 29. Michael FEINSTEIN = Dianne Feinstein of California

30. LINDSAY Vonn + 60. Franklin GRAHAM = Lindsay Graham of South Carolina

80. SUSAN Glaspell + 43. Wilkie COLLINS = Susan Collins of Maine

38. CHARLES Beard + 59. Bob MATHIAS = Charles Mathias of Maryland

3. THOMAS Hobbes + 84. Jimmie DODD = Thomas Dodd of Connecticut

50. WILLIAM Occam + 85. Mark ROTH = William Roth of Delaware

22. GARY Becker + 94. Lorenz HART = Gary Hart of Colorado

72. JOHN Locke + 34. Christopher GLENN = John Glenn of Ohio

74. STEPHEN Decatur + 6. Buster DOUGLAS = Stephen Douglas of Illinois

93. ROY Liechtenstein + 16. James BLUNT = Roy Blunt of Missouri

1. BENJAMIN Franklin + 95. Rex HARRISON = Benjamin Harrison of Indiana

19. JACK Kerouac + 92. Walter REED = Jack Reed of Rhode Island

98. TED Williams + 17. Thaddeus STEVENS = Ted Stevens of Alaska

26. WAYNE LaPierre + 82. Samuel MORSE = Wayne Morse of Oregon

89. LARRY Page + 46. Jenny CRAIG = Larry Craig of Idaho

91. HUEY Newton + 41. Crawford LONG = Huey Long of Louisiana

40. RUFUS Putnam + 70. Bernard KING = Rufus King of New York

36. PATTY + 61. Margaret MURRAY = Patty Murray of Washington

15. ALAN Macdiarmid + 53. Wallis SIMPSON = Alan Simpson of Wyoming

42. HAROLD Godwinson + 99. Langston HUGHES = Harold Hughes of Iowa

65. DENNIS Gabor + 10. Cesar CHAVEZ = Dennis Chavez of New Mexico


UNUSED STATES:

Alabama
Kansas
Michigan
Mississippi
Nebraska
North Dakota
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Dakota
Tennessee
Utah
Virginia
Wisconsin


Last edited by jarnon on Sun Jul 21, 2019 3:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 2:43 pm 
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40. is RUFUS PUTNAM

That may lead to Rufus King, early senator from New York.

I think Gary Hart must be an alternate match, since Mr. Bennet doesn't have a first name and Michael Bennet of Colorado is the only one of his name to serve in the Senate. Unless the clue didn't refer to Mr. Bennet from P&P.

36. PATTY + 61. Margaret MURRAY = Patty Murray of Washington

15. ALAN Macdiarmid + 53. Wallis SIMPSON = Alan Simpson of Wyoming

42. HAROLD Godwinson + 99. Langston HUGHES = Harold Hughes of Iowa.

65. DENNIS Gabor + 10. Cesar CHAVEZ = Dennis Chavez of New Mexico.

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